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JoeysGirl4Ever

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21 reviews in total 
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Casablanca (1942)
2 out of 3 people found the following review useful:
cool baby cool, 28 May 2004

Casablanca, does it reflect society or does society reflect this little hole in the wall resort? When watching the movie, one can't help but notice all the lines that just seem so cliché and yet fit so well into the story; is it because the coolest cat of them all (Humphrey Bogart) is delivering them? Is it because this movie is completely satirical in nature so it just adds humor to the plot? Or is it because the clichés we hear everyday have come from this movie… all 10 + of them.

Maybe not so much reason number 2 but definitely reason 3 and perhaps a little of number 1. Humphrey Bogart is THE definition of 'cool'; literally, look it up in the dictionary and his picture will be there. So when this swanky, hip guy says 'Here's lookin' at you kid' for the umpteenth time, it's acceptable because it's Bogey, and what Bogey does is cool, never overdone.

This movie is set during WWII and is about a leader from the underground movement (Victor Laszlo played by Paul Henreid), his wife (Ilsa Lund Laszlo played by Ingrid Bergman) and the owner of a little café, (Rick Blaine played by Humphrey Bogart). It is about when they have a chance meeting in Morocco, some for a first introduction and others for a surprise reunion. Of course, there is a lovely flashback set to the lovers' song and the story of what happened years ago and how things have ended up the way they are becomes clear. As a 15 year-old freshmen this movie wasn't enjoyable, but 3 years later this movie is absolutely adorable and very much recommended as a 'must-see'. Berlin and Bogart has such chemistry and the story has such an interesting twist, it's hard to accept but at the same time that's how things must be. It leaves you with a sense of completion but at the same time uneasy because there are other possibilities that will never be fulfilled. 3 weeks later, the lost dreams are still irritating to this reviewer.

American society is defiantly portrayed in this film, Humphrey plays a café owner that, 9 times out of 10, is doing something for his own benefit, but then he does something to help someone else and it just seems to completely mask the 'bad' things he may have done. For example, there is gambling going on in Rick's Café; there is a roulette wheel, in fact, a fixed one. This wheel is fixed so that Rick is getting more returns back and it isn't a fair game of chance. But then a woman in a desperate situation with a genuine need for money to save herself, her husband, and their marriage comes along and Rick gets soft. He then discreetly tells the woman's husband the winning slot number and color so that he can win money and they can get on to a better place. Rick saved that woman from a huge burden and it completely makes up for his owning a fixed wheel.

This is much in the same way reflective of American society. As a country we are constantly doing what we need to get ahead in life, even if for some people it requires cheating or lying; much the same way we have tremendous powers over other countries… we didn't get it just by sweet-talking. But other people will come along once in a while and hit a soft spot in your heart and there is an urge to do the right thing and help them out, much like a country will be in need and we'll help them out, hopefully in the best way possible.

This movie is really a great one; it has love, danger, and politics, an interesting mixture of topics to keep every person interested in some way. Rated highly among movies it definitely has earned a top spot on this reviewers list. And if anything, it reminds us to help other around us make the best possible decisions for their lives, we need to follow Rick's example a little more often even if he does do a lot of dirty business he truly does care for those around him if they are good people.

Casablanca (1942)
1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
cute movie, 28 May 2004

Casablanca, does it reflect society or does society reflect this little hole in the wall resort? When watching the movie, one can't help but notice all the lines that just seem so cliché and yet fit so well into the story; is it because the coolest cat of them all (Humphrey Bogart) is delivering them? Is it because this movie is completely satirical in nature so it just adds humor to the plot? Or is it because the clichés we hear everyday have come from this movie… all 10 + of them.

Maybe not so much reason number 2 but definitely reason 3 and perhaps a little of number 1. Humphrey Bogart is THE definition of 'cool'; literally, look it up in the dictionary and his picture will be there. So when this swanky, hip guy says 'Here's lookin' at you kid' for the umpteenth time, it's acceptable because it's Bogey, and what Bogey does is cool, never overdone.

This movie is set during WWII and is about a leader from the underground movement (Victor Laszlo played by Paul Henreid), his wife (Ilsa Lund Laszlo played by Ingrid Bergman) and the owner of a little café, (Rick Blaine played by Humphrey Bogart). It is about when they have a chance meeting in Morocco, some for a first introduction and others for a surprise reunion. Of course, there is a lovely flashback set to the lovers' song and the story of what happened years ago and how things have ended up the way they are becomes clear. As a 15 year-old freshmen this movie wasn't enjoyable, but 3 years later this movie is absolutely adorable and very much recommended as a 'must-see'. Berlin and Bogart has such chemistry and the story has such an interesting twist, it's hard to accept but at the same time that's how things must be. It leaves you with a sense of completion but at the same time uneasy because there are other possibilities that will never be fulfilled. 3 weeks later, the lost dreams are still irritating to this reviewer.

American society is defiantly portrayed in this film, Humphrey plays a café owner that, 9 times out of 10, is doing something for his own benefit, but then he does something to help someone else and it just seems to completely mask the 'bad' things he may have done. For example, there is gambling going on in Rick's Café; there is a roulette wheel, in fact, a fixed one. This wheel is fixed so that Rick is getting more returns back and it isn't a fair game of chance. But then a woman in a desperate situation with a genuine need for money to save herself, her husband, and their marriage comes along and Rick gets soft. He then discreetly tells the woman's husband the winning slot number and color so that he can win money and they can get on to a better place. Rick saved that woman from a huge burden and it completely makes up for his owning a fixed wheel.

This is much in the same way reflective of American society. As a country we are constantly doing what we need to get ahead in life, even if for some people it requires cheating or lying; much the same way we have tremendous powers over other countries… we didn't get it just by sweet-talking. But other people will come along once in a while and hit a soft spot in your heart and there is an urge to do the right thing and help them out, much like a country will be in need and we'll help them out, hopefully in the best way possible.

This movie is really a great one; it has love, danger, and politics, an interesting mixture of topics to keep every person interested in some way. Rated highly among movies it definitely has earned a top spot on this reviewers list. And if anything, it reminds us to help other around us make the best possible decisions for their lives, we need to follow Rick's example a little more often even if he does do a lot of dirty business he truly does care for those around him if they are good people.

0 out of 3 people found the following review useful:
THE BEST MOVIE EVER!!!, 28 May 2004
10/10

The Godfather has quickly become this reviewer's favorite dramatic movie. With a mixture of love, action and scandalous plot developments not once in the 175 minutes of watching it did looking at the clock to see how much longer it would be come to mind. There is such a sympathy created for the Corleone family that you end up rooting for them, even though they are a mafia related family. It's crazy to think about really, for instance, this reviewer can't remember the last time she felt sympathy for a murderer… The Godfather is amazing, it's well written, and the cast just meshes well on screen. The names can be confusing because they are all Italian and people address each other by their last name most of the time, but after a while it starts to make a little sense. The lead character of the movie is, surprisingly, Michael Corleone (Al Pacino). This story follows his coming of age from a young man wishing to get as far away from the business to his deep involvement after some family catastrophes. Upon first introduction Michael is dressed in his service uniform and bringing a new love, Kay (Diane Keaton), to the wedding of his sister. When Kay asks about his family, and his father in particular, Michael explains to her that his father is a mafia leader and he wants nothing at all to be like him. So far, he had been doing very well at trying to keep himself separated, until one day when his father gets shot in the back several times and is put into the hospital. Well, of course, the henchmen aren't going to be satisfied with just putting him in the hospital, they want to finish the job. Luckily, Michael goes to visit his father and upon arrival realizes that there is no one there keeping guard over his father. He calls his brother to get backup and places his father in a different room in the hospital. The suspense in this scene is SO heavy it's almost suffocating, in a good way. There are distant footsteps heard coming toward Michael's father and this reviewer felt her hands clench and her heart beat racing; it was so well done. But this is the point when Michael really starts to enter the mafia; and he only gets deeper and deeper into it as the movie plays out. There is, however, one death scene that is a bit too played out. A character is in a car and suddenly there are a gazillion guys around the car and they all have rapid firing guns. Well, the character is shot while in the car and proceeds to crawl across the seat and exit out the passenger side of the car. At which point, the character puts themselves in full exposure to the henchmen. Why? No clue, but then another 70 or 80 shots are successfully taken AND THEN one of the henchmen proceeds to take a few shots at close range and throw in a few kicks. This is a bit excessive upon reflection but at the time, this reviewer almost cried. It was SO unfair! If it wasn't for the fact that it is completely impossible, jumping into the screen to save the victim was all this reviewer could think of. Once again, it's amazing because the victim wasn't exactly an angel to say the least.

The story is truly what manipulates the audience to feel sympathy for this family. They seem to be falling apart left and right, which is tough to see because they used to be such a strong unit. The values of family love seem to be falling apart with each new marriage, the men are trying to stay ahead in the game but they keep getting attacked from behind because there are traitors amongst the alliances. Personally, this reviewer can't wait to see the two following films in this trilogy and compare them to the first, because topping this one will be extremely difficult. If your looking for an awesome drama, watch The Godfather, it's got a little bit of everything in the story for everyone. It's a great movie to watch on an icky day when you're stuck at home, because it will make time fly so fast.

1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
eh alright, 27 May 2004

Jimmy Stewart is the famous `guy next-door' type of actor and certainly does well playing one. `Mr. Smith Goes to Washington' is a movie about good old-fashioned patriotism and the lack there-of in today's society. This movie was sweet but a little hard to get excited about; the small, very small, love story is really what kept this reviewer's interest and to say that the plot was riveting, well, would be a bit too much, in all honesty.

As stated before Jimmy Stewart (Jefferson Smith) did what he does best, and that's look handsome, play the part of a confused, yet loveable man and fall in love with the right woman. Having watched two other films that Stewart has starred in, this character is definitely the most straightforward and easiest to read, not exactly a round character. This is his early work and really what the story need though, so in this case it's completely acceptable. His love interest is a very pretty woman (Clarissa Saunders played by Jean Arthur) who most ladies can sympathize with because of the fact that Mr. Smith takes a little while to notice her in the way that she comes to notice him. The love story is truly a breath of fresh air compared to most today; there are no sex scenes or any inclination of any hanky-panky and that receives a huge applause from this reviewer where it seems that in every movie and every television show that people are `shacking it up' all the time. Besides the love story, the situation at hand is that a senator has suddenly passed away while a very important bill is at a critical point in the senate. The replacement needs to be a `yes-man', and naively the replacement is chosen to be Mr. Smith. Which at first seems to be the right one because he is in awe about EVERYTHING that goes on, even the young boys who help in the meetings know more than Mr. Smith does. Well eventually Mr. Smith gets his bearings with the help of his secretary and he soon discovers a scandal occurring involving his idol and father's best friend and this truly upsets the uncorrupted American patriot that is Mr. Smith and he soon tries all that he can to fix what's going on. The conclusion unfortunately is so abrupt and after all the time and energy invested in the scenes leading up to it, creates a bit of disappointment to the viewer. While the viewer really wants to applaud the attempts of Mr. Smith it's a bit of a cheesy ending and a bit unbelievable. However, this really opened the eyes of this reviewer to the means necessary to pass a bill, and how it's not just cut and dry, there has to be a lot of persuasion, not just `this is a good bill because' but more like `if you vote for this bill I'll do you a favor…'. This concept is really sad because it makes one wonder if that's what the founding fathers wanted congress to look like, if that's how things needed to be accomplished. Knowing that the good guys have honesty and scruples and that they wouldn't do things that way can lead to be really upsetting because they would be the ones to try to pass bills to help the good of the cause.

In essence this movie was decent, a `must-see'?; probably not, unless congress and politics really get your engine revving or if you're a big Jimmy Stewart fan. The plot is a bit basic and the ending predictable but it's a cute flick. The love story is the most interesting part for this reviewer but the politics were kind of interesting as well.

Casablanca (1942)
0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
smooth baby smooth, 27 May 2004

Casablanca, does it reflect society or does society reflect this little hole in the wall resort? When watching the movie, one can't help but notice all the lines that just seem so cliché and yet fit so well into the story; is it because the coolest cat of them all (Humphrey Bogart) is delivering them? Is it because this movie is completely satirical in nature so it just adds humor to the plot? Or is it because the clichés we hear everyday have come from this movie… all 10 + of them.

Maybe not so much reason number 2 but definitely reason 3 and perhaps a little of number 1. Humphrey Bogart is THE definition of 'cool'; literally, look it up in the dictionary and his picture will be there. So when this swanky, hip guy says 'Here's lookin' at you kid' for the umpteenth time, it's acceptable because it's Bogey, and what Bogey does is cool, never overdone.

This movie is set during WWII and is about a leader from the underground movement (Victor Laszlo played by Paul Henreid), his wife (Ilsa Lund Laszlo played by Ingrid Bergman) and the owner of a little café, (Rick Blaine played by Humphrey Bogart). It is about when they have a chance meeting in Morocco, some for a first introduction and others for a surprise reunion. Of course, there is a lovely flashback set to the lovers' song and the story of what happened years ago and how things have ended up the way they are becomes clear. As a 15 year-old freshmen this movie wasn't enjoyable, but 3 years later this movie is absolutely adorable and very much recommended as a 'must-see'. Berlin and Bogart has such chemistry and the story has such an interesting twist, it's hard to accept but at the same time that's how things must be. It leaves you with a sense of completion but at the same time uneasy because there are other possibilities that will never be fulfilled. 3 weeks later, the lost dreams are still irritating to this reviewer.

American society is defiantly portrayed in this film, Humphrey plays a café owner that, 9 times out of 10, is doing something for his own benefit, but then he does something to help someone else and it just seems to completely mask the 'bad' things he may have done. For example, there is gambling going on in Rick's Café; there is a roulette wheel, in fact, a fixed one. This wheel is fixed so that Rick is getting more returns back and it isn't a fair game of chance. But then a woman in a desperate situation with a genuine need for money to save herself, her husband, and their marriage comes along and Rick gets soft. He then discreetly tells the woman's husband the winning slot number and color so that he can win money and they can get on to a better place. Rick saved that woman from a huge burden and it completely makes up for his owning a fixed wheel.

This is much in the same way reflective of American society. As a country we are constantly doing what we need to get ahead in life, even if for some people it requires cheating or lying; much the same way we have tremendous powers over other countries… we didn't get it just by sweet-talking. But other people will come along once in a while and hit a soft spot in your heart and there is an urge to do the right thing and help them out, much like a country will be in need and we'll help them out, hopefully in the best way possible.

This movie is really a great one; it has love, danger, and politics, an interesting mixture of topics to keep every person interested in some way. Rated highly among movies it definitely has earned a top spot on this reviewers list. And if anything, it reminds us to help other around us make the best possible decisions for their lives, we need to follow Rick's example a little more often even if he does do a lot of dirty business he truly does care for those around him if they are good people.

Casablanca (1942)
0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
mmm mmm good, 25 May 2004

Casablanca, does it reflect society or does society reflect this little hole in the wall resort? When watching the movie, one can't help but notice all the lines that just seem so cliché and yet fit so well into the story; is it because the coolest cat of them all (Humphrey Bogart) is delivering them? Is it because this movie is completely satirical in nature so it just adds humor to the plot? Or is it because the clichés we hear everyday have come from this movie… all 10 + of them.

Maybe not so much reason number 2 but definitely reason 3 and perhaps a little of number 1. Humphrey Bogart is THE definition of 'cool'; literally, look it up in the dictionary and his picture will be there. So when this swanky, hip guy says 'Here's lookin' at you kid' for the umpteenth time, it's acceptable because it's Bogey, and what Bogey does is cool, never overdone.

This movie is set during WWII and is about a leader from the underground movement (Victor Laszlo played by Paul Henreid), his wife (Ilsa Lund Laszlo played by Ingrid Bergman) and the owner of a little café, (Rick Blaine played by Humphrey Bogart). It is about when they have a chance meeting in Morocco, some for a first introduction and others for a surprise reunion. Of course, there is a lovely flashback set to the lovers' song and the story of what happened years ago and how things have ended up the way they are becomes clear. As a 15 year-old freshmen this movie wasn't enjoyable, but 3 years later this movie is absolutely adorable and very much recommended as a 'must-see'. Berlin and Bogart has such chemistry and the story has such an interesting twist, it's hard to accept but at the same time that's how things must be. It leaves you with a sense of completion but at the same time uneasy because there are other possibilities that will never be fulfilled. 3 weeks later, the lost dreams are still irritating to this reviewer.

American society is defiantly portrayed in this film, Humphrey plays a café owner that, 9 times out of 10, is doing something for his own benefit, but then he does something to help someone else and it just seems to completely mask the 'bad' things he may have done. For example, there is gambling going on in Rick's Café; there is a roulette wheel, in fact, a fixed one. This wheel is fixed so that Rick is getting more returns back and it isn't a fair game of chance. But then a woman in a desperate situation with a genuine need for money to save herself, her husband, and their marriage comes along and Rick gets soft. He then discreetly tells the woman's husband the winning slot number and color so that he can win money and they can get on to a better place. Rick saved that woman from a huge burden and it completely makes up for his owning a fixed wheel.

This is much in the same way reflective of American society. As a country we are constantly doing what we need to get ahead in life, even if for some people it requires cheating or lying; much the same way we have tremendous powers over other countries… we didn't get it just by sweet-talking. But other people will come along once in a while and hit a soft spot in your heart and there is an urge to do the right thing and help them out, much like a country will be in need and we'll help them out, hopefully in the best way possible.

This movie is really a great one; it has love, danger, and politics, an interesting mixture of topics to keep every person interested in some way. Rated highly among movies it definitely has earned a top spot on this reviewers list. And if anything, it reminds us to help other around us make the best possible decisions for their lives, we need to follow Rick's example a little more often even if he does do a lot of dirty business he truly does care for those around him if they are good people.

Casablanca (1942)
0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
I LOVE IT!, 24 May 2004

Casablanca, does it reflect society or does society reflect this little hole in the wall resort? When watching the movie, one can't help but notice all the lines that just seem so cliché and yet fit so well into the story; is it because the coolest cat of them all (Humphrey Bogart) is delivering them? Is it because this movie is completely satirical in nature so it just adds humor to the plot? Or is it because the clichés we hear everyday have come from this movie… all 10 + of them.

Maybe not so much reason number 2 but definitely reason 3 and perhaps a little of number 1. Humphrey Bogart is THE definition of 'cool'; literally, look it up in the dictionary and his picture will be there. So when this swanky, hip guy says 'Here's lookin' at you kid' for the umpteenth time, it's acceptable because it's Bogey, and what Bogey does is cool, never overdone.

This movie is set during WWII and is about a leader from the underground movement (Victor Laszlo played by Paul Henreid), his wife (Ilsa Lund Laszlo played by Ingrid Bergman) and the owner of a little café, (Rick Blaine played by Humphrey Bogart). It is about when they have a chance meeting in Morocco, some for a first introduction and others for a surprise reunion. Of course, there is a lovely flashback set to the lovers' song and the story of what happened years ago and how things have ended up the way they are becomes clear. As a 15 year-old freshmen this movie wasn't enjoyable, but 3 years later this movie is absolutely adorable and very much recommended as a 'must-see'. Berlin and Bogart has such chemistry and the story has such an interesting twist, it's hard to accept but at the same time that's how things must be. It leaves you with a sense of completion but at the same time uneasy because there are other possibilities that will never be fulfilled. 3 weeks later, the lost dreams are still irritating to this reviewer.

American society is defiantly portrayed in this film, Humphrey plays a café owner that, 9 times out of 10, is doing something for his own benefit, but then he does something to help someone else and it just seems to completely mask the 'bad' things he may have done. For example, there is gambling going on in Rick's Café; there is a roulette wheel, in fact, a fixed one. This wheel is fixed so that Rick is getting more returns back and it isn't a fair game of chance. But then a woman in a desperate situation with a genuine need for money to save herself, her husband, and their marriage comes along and Rick gets soft. He then discreetly tells the woman's husband the winning slot number and color so that he can win money and they can get on to a better place. Rick saved that woman from a huge burden and it completely makes up for his owning a fixed wheel.

This is much in the same way reflective of American society. As a country we are constantly doing what we need to get ahead in life, even if for some people it requires cheating or lying; much the same way we have tremendous powers over other countries… we didn't get it just by sweet-talking. But other people will come along once in a while and hit a soft spot in your heart and there is an urge to do the right thing and help them out, much like a country will be in need and we'll help them out, hopefully in the best way possible.

This movie is really a great one; it has love, danger, and politics, an interesting mixture of topics to keep every person interested in some way. Rated highly among movies it definitely has earned a top spot on this reviewers list. And if anything, it reminds us to help other around us make the best possible decisions for their lives, we need to follow Rick's example a little more often even if he does do a lot of dirty business he truly does care for those around him if they are good people.

2 out of 9 people found the following review useful:
Eh, it was OK, 24 May 2004

Jimmy Stewart is the famous 'guy next-door' type of actor and certainly does well playing one. 'Mr. Smith Goes to Washington' is a movie about good old-fashioned patriotism and the lack there-of in today's society. This movie was sweet but a little hard to get excited about; the small, very small, love story is really what kept this reviewer's interest and to say that the plot was riveting, well, would be a bit too much, in all honesty.

As stated before Jimmy Stewart (Jefferson Smith) did what he does best, and that's look handsome, play the part of a confused, yet lovable man and fall in love with the right woman. Having watched two other films that Stewart has starred in, this character is definitely the most straightforward and easiest to read, not exactly a round character. This is his early work and really what the story need though, so in this case it's completely acceptable. His love interest is a very pretty woman (Clarissa Saunders played by Jean Arthur) who most ladies can sympathize with because of the fact that Mr. Smith takes a little while to notice her in the way that she comes to notice him. The love story is truly a breath of fresh air compared to most today; there are no sex scenes or any inclination of any hanky-panky and that receives a huge applause from this reviewer where it seems that in every movie and every television show that people are 'shacking it up' all the time.

Besides the love story, the situation at hand is that a senator has suddenly passed away while a very important bill is at a critical point in the senate. The replacement needs to be a 'yes-man', and naively the replacement is chosen to be Mr. Smith. Which at first seems to be the right one because he is in awe about EVERYTHING that goes on, even the young boys who help in the meetings know more than Mr. Smith does. Well eventually Mr. Smith gets his bearings with the help of his secretary and he soon discovers a scandal occurring involving his idol and father's best friend and this truly upsets the uncorrupted American patriot that is Mr. Smith and he soon tries all that he can to fix what's going on. The conclusion unfortunately is so abrupt and after all the time and energy invested in the scenes leading up to it, creates a bit of disappointment to the viewer. While the viewer really wants to applaud the attempts of Mr. Smith it's a bit of a cheesy ending and a bit unbelievable.

However, this really opened the eyes of this reviewer to the means necessary to pass a bill, and how it's not just cut and dry, there has to be a lot of persuasion, not just 'this is a good bill because' but more like 'if you vote for this bill I'll do you a favor…'. This concept is really sad because it makes one wonder if that's what the founding fathers wanted congress to look like, if that's how things needed to be accomplished. Knowing that the good guys have honesty and scruples and that they wouldn't do things that way can lead to be really upsetting because they would be the ones to try to pass bills to help the good of the cause.

In essence this movie was decent, a 'must-see'?; probably not, unless congress and politics really get your engine revving or if you're a big Jimmy Stewart fan. The plot is a bit basic and the ending predictable but it's a cute flick. The love story is the most interesting part for this reviewer but the politics were kind of interesting as well.

0 out of 6 people found the following review useful:
what's the big deal about marilyn?, 20 April 2004

Some Like It Hot…the perfect title to fit this movie, if anyone is shocked by Britney Spears then they'll be just as shocked by Marilyn Monroe, the only thing is… this movie is set many years ago when swimsuits were more like body suits. Growing up with the `Britney Icon', nothing could seemed to have shocked this reviewer, but Marilyn's even dresses and lingerie were making this reviewer cringe and very uncomfortable. Despite Marilyn's ensemble, this is a well written story with fun little twists and turns. Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon steal the show even though the famous Marilyn Monroe is also part of the cast.

Marilyn Monroe is remembered as this super sexy woman with class and innocence, after watching the movie… the phrase `dumb blonde' comes to mind. This woman is all about sex appeal and her acting skills aren't exactly all that impressive. Not to mention her blondeness comes from a bottle of peroxide, she comes across as cheap and easy, not the innocent girl who just keeps falling for the wrong guy.

Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon, however, are true class acts. They pull off a good fake out and truly could be confused as women… ugly and oversized, but women none-the-less. They make a great duo and could easily be seen as best friends outside of the set, their chemistry is great and their acting even better.

The storyline is a fun one, two traveling musicians following their dream and living from paycheck to paycheck, not willing to give up their hopes but really hitting rock bottom. Then, wham! They witness a crime, mafia related of course, and need to escape for their lives. The only opportunity provided for an escape is being part of an all female band heading for Florida, these 2 Chicago boys have to then become cross-dressers to take up the opportunity. This is then when they meet Sugar… (Marilyn Monroe) and the rest is history. There are a few interesting close calls and a funny ending to make this movie a worthwhile viewing.

All-in-all this is a movie that deserves to be seen by anyone interested in a light-hearted comedy, even though Marilyn is a bit racy and, well, annoying. Some Like It Hot is a must see and comes high recommended from this reviewer. Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis bring this movie full circle and make an interesting pair, as men or women.

1 out of 4 people found the following review useful:
what's the big deal about marilyn?, 20 April 2004

Some Like It Hot…the perfect title to fit this movie, if anyone is shocked by Britney Spears then they'll be just as shocked by Marilyn Monroe, the only thing is… this movie is set many years ago when swimsuits were more like body suits. Growing up with the `Britney Icon', nothing could seemed to have shocked this reviewer, but Marilyn's even dresses and lingerie were making this reviewer cringe and very uncomfortable. Despite Marilyn's ensemble, this is a well written story with fun little twists and turns. Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon steal the show even though the famous Marilyn Monroe is also part of the cast.

Marilyn Monroe is remembered as this super sexy woman with class and innocence, after watching the movie… the phrase `dumb blonde' comes to mind. This woman is all about sex appeal and her acting skills aren't exactly all that impressive. Not to mention her blondeness comes from a bottle of peroxide, she comes across as cheap and easy, not the innocent girl who just keeps falling for the wrong guy.

Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon, however, are true class acts. They pull off a good fake out and truly could be confused as women… ugly and oversized, but women none-the-less. They make a great duo and could easily be seen as best friends outside of the set, their chemistry is great and their acting even better.

The storyline is a fun one, two traveling musicians following their dream and living from paycheck to paycheck, not willing to give up their hopes but really hitting rock bottom. Then, wham! They witness a crime, mafia related of course, and need to escape for their lives. The only opportunity provided for an escape is being part of an all female band heading for Florida, these 2 Chicago boys have to then become cross-dressers to take up the opportunity. This is then when they meet Sugar… (Marilyn Monroe) and the rest is history. There are a few interesting close calls and a funny ending to make this movie a worthwhile viewing.

All-in-all this is a movie that deserves to be seen by anyone interested in a light-hearted comedy, even though Marilyn is a bit racy and, well, annoying. Some Like It Hot is a must see and comes high recommended from this reviewer. Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis bring this movie full circle and make an interesting pair, as men or women.


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