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Ted (2012)
8/10
Seth MacFarlane sews together a comedy with exhaustingly humorous filling
22 July 2012
Director Seth MacFarlane takes a cuddly and innocent-looking teddy bear and sews together the relentlessly hilarious and amusingly feisty- "Ted". With nearly all of Ted's unpredictably raunchy yet ridiculously entertaining lines, a higher expectation for hilarity is set every single time. Sure, many of the scenarios and conversations are utterly nonsensical, but the fun of completely blasting away most of the air in our lungs in sheer laughter quickly waives the need for much logic. Furthermore, Mark Wahlberg and Mila Kunis prove to be a compatible addition to Ted's uncanny sense of humor. The storyline, unlike most of Ted's comments, is more predictable but even so, the inertial laughter carries the enjoyment and thrill created by him all the way to the end. All in all, "Ted" is a prime example of that laugh-out-loud-until-the-very-end type of film that is a worthwhile watch because of its absurd yet exhaustingly humorous filling.
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6/10
Vibrant acting poisoned by a wan portrayal of events
17 June 2012
Exuding paralyzing malice with every piercing glare, Charlize Theron as Ravenna launches a defining on-screen presence that has us cringing both in sheer horror and endless admiration as she contrasts her praiseworthy nefariousness in the angelically pure yet unwaveringly brave light of Kristen Stewart's elegantly interpreted protagonist- Snow White in "Snow White and the Huntsman". Although both of these actresses shine by delivering vivid performances, the comparatively pallid portrayal of events with rather wan confrontations and weak imaginative prowess showcased during scenes shot in the arcane domains of the dark forest inflict a poisoning effect overall. Such a mystifying background teeming with countless possibilities to exploit is unfortunately squandered by including a few derivative creatures and your run-of-the-mill encounter between humans and an over-sized adversary that, in this film especially, left a considerably bland trail behind. Frequently, in between the talented performances by both Kristen Stewart and Charlize Theron, "Snow White and the Huntsman" resembles a pale and dormant hybrid between the forbidden forest scenes from the Harry Potter series and the beautifully puissant scenes starring Aslan from the Narnia installments. Ultimately, "Snow White and the Huntsman" is a worthwhile watch considering the astonishingly talented performances by the lead actresses albeit the colorless portrayal of the story.
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Project X (2012)
8/10
Xplosive, Xplicit and Xuberant
21 April 2012
Warning: Spoilers
Xplosive, Xplicit and riotously Xuberant, "Project X" invites us to attend an absolutely anarchical party overflowing with nearly all teen mind's most crazed dreams all blown amusingly out of imaginative proportion, but thankfully, without holding us responsible for the incurred havoc. It begins when a close group of high school friends, ranked rather poorly on the scale of social fame, establishes that it will project itself toward the acme of coolness by means of hosting the wildest birthday party possible. With a few comical mishaps along the way, the film reaches its long-awaited climax quickly: the party itself. From here on, "Project X" begins to redefine the common standards of teenage festivities, even in the cinematographic world. One ludicrous feat after another, the climaxing point consistently escalates and guarantees an epic final half for the film. With flying dogs, free-falling teens, sinking cars, flame-throwing lunatics and much, much more, "Project X" is evidently more than well-equipped to thoroughly entertain the audience. After all of the intense uproar subsides and fires are extinguished, there seems to prevail some consensus between the hosts, those who attended and those who watched- a bittersweet feeling within whispers that the destruction brought on by the party was not entirely in vain.
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7/10
"We Bought a Zoo"
7 April 2012
Within the Rosemoor Wildlife Park one can find majestic lions guarding their domain with royal poise, tigers patrolling their enclosures with intimidating growls, ostriches frenetically sprinting on their lanky legs and last but not least- and perhaps the most fascinating sight of all- a widower (Benjamin Mee- Matt Damon) attempting to mitigate the irascible growls of his older son (Dylan Mee- Colin Ford) and subdue his wild urge to sprint away from life's hardships all while trying to uphold a controlled poise for his younger daughter (Rosie Mee- Maggie Jones). "We Bought a Zoo" is an amiably tamed yet rawly sentimental dramedy that offers a predominantly mellow panorama of a family that learns how to reconnect under uncanny circumstances. The film incorporates a warm-hearted sense of humor and believable acting displayed especially by Matt Damon, Colin Ford and Scarlett Johansson. Although "We Bought a Zoo" is far from being a crazed safari ride with unforeseeable plot twists, in truth it does not need to be. The familial intricacies and the handful of laughable moments are sufficient to maintain the attention of a patiently observant audience. In sum, "We Bought a Zoo" is a worthwhile and comical visit into the savage hardships of human life juxtaposed by the appropriately wild backdrop of a zoo.
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6/10
Bland of the Titans
5 April 2012
Heroically extolled for confronting an army of horripilating and lavishly overpowered brutes, Perseus (Sam Worthington) in "Wrath of the Titans" still wavers in vanquishing his prime nemesis: his inflexibly cemented facial expression of monochromatic anger lingering in nearly all scenes. Although emotionally limited, the film compensates through countless, visually ornate clashes involving a gargantuan lava-spraying monstrosity, a drool-exuding minotaur, a multi-headed fire-breathing beast as well as other more humanly opponents that still impress with their ridiculously potent tridents. The 3D feature of the film is well employed and exploited by showcasing the aforementioned community of garishly astounding characters under this more emphatic perspective. A stable camera-work also ensures that viewers are able to satisfactorily discern the action that takes place without the irksome turbulence that dazes and obfuscates the on-screen happenings in many films. Overall, this stability positively highlights the legion of 3D behemoths but it seems that the protagonist has taken the title too personally by showing us his one-expression-fits-all acting...again.
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8/10
Pulls us back with its taut drama and shoots us out of our seats with its intense action
24 March 2012
Based on the flagitious tradition of condemning 24 youths from all districts to partake in a draconian competition that inevitably engenders a nefarious form of collective annihilation, "The Hunger Games" entrances us in its dramatically taut bow of breathtaking scenes and propels a clever, arrowhead-sharp dissection of an oppressed society. The film adopts the predominantly dramatic direction of depicting the heavy sentiments of the contestants prior to the initiation of such a high-stakes game as well as their nail-bitingly exciting predator- prey hunts and also finds time to contribute further to the emotional dynamism by harvesting the added complications of a well-acted love affair. Although the barbaric games themselves only officially commence a while into the film, the transcending performance of Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss Everdeen builds plenty of momentum to engulf us in her plight. Furthermore, the garishly ostentatious costumery is not only a source of fascination but a well crafted symbolic visualization of how colorless and mendacious the majority of the people of Panem are behind their tawdrily-dyed visages. In sum, "The Hunger Games" pulls us tautly back into our seats with its frightening yet brilliantly acted scenes prior to the ultimate competition and shoots us forward with its even more astounding aim of capturing the breathtaking perils that the protagonist faces during the game itself.
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5/10
An Innocuous Sightseeing Journey
23 March 2012
Warning: Spoilers
Set in a land abounding with Lilliputian elephants, Brobdingnagian lizards, blindingly coruscating sea serpents and gold-spewing volcanoes, "Journey 2: The Mysterious Island" exhibits a visual gasconade of rather derivative, technologically spawned fauna and suscitates rare instances of engaging conflicts with the film's characters, which ultimately renders the arcane and supposedly perilous exploration an innocuous sightseeing experience. In comparison to its previous installment, "Journey to the Center of the Earth", the second one benefits from Dwayne Johnson's rather risible facetiousness but suffers from an ephemerality of suspenseful chases and from a dearth of clever, screen-protruding scenes made possible by the film's 3D component. The storyline itself fails to incorporate any new thrills given its harmlessly hackneyed three-step approach of finding the enigmatical territory, exploring its content and escaping from it unscathed. Overall, "Journey 2: The Mysterious Island" is a harmless touristic stroll across an intricately designed environment of bizarreness.
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7/10
Predictably unpredictable scares
16 March 2012
"The Woman in Black" succeeds in paralyzing us in a maddening inquietude of anticipating that abrupt scare that congeals our every sense in exciting horror. Admittedly we can easily pinpoint the occurrence of that breath-constricting jolt of a scene well beforehand, but even being prepared the film can break through our guard and deliver a considerably puissant surprise. No matter how many possible continuations we may conjure in our imagination, and regardless of how terrifying these can be, the actual follow-up manages to induce that split-second heart attack of fright. However, in between these unexpectedly expectable terrors, "The Woman in Black" is not as horrifying as other films of the same genre. Cast-wise, Daniel Radcliffe does not seem to represent the ideal candidate to play the more mature role of a father figure, but overall the film carries on rather smoothly in his presence. Beyond the shadow of a doubt, "The Woman in Black" proves to be an efficacious fright fest that alerts us with its dreadfully unpredictable predictability.
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3/10
Ghost Rider: Entertainment Torrefaction
9 March 2012
Warning: Spoilers
After blazing through a fusillade of comparatively igneous stunts in "Ghost Rider", the flaming motorcyclist grovels back in "Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance" with an extinguished storyline and spiritless confrontations that defuse the spark of interest ignited by the first installment. The clashes witnessed in this continuation culminate in lifeless chain lashes that obliterate enemies into bright ashes within a few seconds after they have been spawned on screen. The final showdown displays a more creative approach to the vapid fighting sequences initiated erstwhile but unfortunately fulminates into an all too ephemeral explosion given away prematurely in one of the trailers. Additionally, the comical flare that attempts to shine brighter than the dim glint of action sequences is quickly burnt out with Nicolas Cage's rather acerbically torched jokes. Overall, "Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance" torrefies the quality potential it lit previously with tediously charred CG craftsmanship, action scenes and humor.
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Albert Nobbs (2011)
5/10
An oddity concealing dullness
3 March 2012
Purporting a vitreous gaze that congeals those who behold it in sheer bewilderment and projecting a guttural voice heavily straining to conceal a secret, "Albert Nobbs" is an oddity whose life, disappointingly, is far less compelling than meets the eye. The experiences and conflictions of such a visually flabbergasting protagonist contrast drastically in the film's insipid and disjointed portrayal of other characters whose lives and appearances are far more dreary. Some of the lifelong ambitions of Albert Nobbs are merely touched upon and swiftly erased from memory and inevitably rendered void by a heap of bland occurrences that assuage the intended drama. Consequently, the thematic tribulation of existing in a sexist society is hardly accentuated. It seems "Albert Nobbs" is overly self-absorbed in its image and devotes little attention to developing its emotional profundity. On the other hand, Glenn Close skillfully steps into the shoes of an androgynous and awe-inspiring persona and baffles all spectators with her seamless transition into another, completely unrecognizable body. This is done in such flawlessness that when Albert Nobbs does wear a dress, one cannot help but think that he is witnessing someone cross-dress. Overall, "Albert Nobbs" is externally thrilling but internally dull.
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The Help (2011)
9/10
A resonating stand for the erasure of racism
26 February 2012
"The Help" is a cathartically fulgurating hurricane of powerful emotions formed by the causticity of racial discrimination and by the heartwarming stand taken against it principally by a brave triad of ideological warriors, portrayed by Viola Davis as Aibileen, Emma Stone as Skeeter and Octavia Spencer as Minny. The journey they embrace to cure society from such a destructive social malaise sheds light on inarguably incandescent acting showcased especially by Octavia Spencer's bi-stellar performance of deftly amalgamating an entertaining hilarity and a tear- flooding lugubriousness in her every appearance and Viola Davis for her masterful talent of accentuating the piercing torment delivered by the pointless yet painfully sharp blade of racism. Apart from the mesmerizing acting, "The Help" also displays its expertise in transcending compelling emotions in its imagination of delicate situations and continuing with an even more dramatic followup that will assuredly trigger a deluge of tears. Although the film assuages the perils of leading such an insurrection during the time, it still succeeds in epitomizing the elation associated with bearing the courage of commanding such acts. Overall, "The Help" is a poignant tale that shows the early cleansing of an annihilative idea.
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Jack and Jill (I) (2011)
2/10
Jack and Jill tumble downhill
26 February 2012
Vapid and dispensable, asinine and haphazard, inane and insane, "Jack and Jill" is sadly nothing more than a sly euphemistic synonym for all of the above. Immediately within the first few scenes, Adam Sandler barbarously hurls the audience down a steep hill of bone-snappingly lamentable pseudo-jokes. If one's patience is not shattered altogether from this absolutely cataclysmic plummet, then assuredly Adam Sandler's high-pitched and dissonant attempt at impersonating his female counterpart will. An equally deplorable sight is witnessing Al Pacino squander himself playing such an incomprehensibly futile role. Other than that, there is nothing more to discuss. Overall, "Jack and Jill" is a vacuous voyage up the hill of ennui.
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8/10
Knockout sensational
25 February 2012
A left hook delivering unstoppable laughter followed by a potent spinning back kick of visually mesmerizing instances combined with a few minor jabs of sentimental profundity topped off with an insuppressible uppercut of insanely entertaining action sequences send this film flying up the list of animation favorites. There is no reason to believe it fends off the older spectators given its timeless ability to grapple onto the attention of the adults through the knockout sensational fighting scenes and amusing jokes, which unlike other animated movies, do not hover around an age-specific style. "Kung Fu Panda 2" does not forget to shatter the criticism of those viewers expecting a film containing a moral or some philosophical idea since it outlines the lesson of finding inner peace within one's life by learning to coexist harmoniously at present. The viewers themselves, however, could counterattack by arguing that this so-called moral fails to scratch the surface and is trite. Nonetheless, "Kung Fu Panda 2" emerges victorious as it provides a well-rounded source of entertainment for this summer.
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5/10
Confidently acted, confusingly constructed
25 February 2012
While mercilessly strangling the spectators with its fatally expeditious web of events, "The Lincoln Lawyer" sends the audience gasping for a brief pause that would enable them to catch up with the excessively fast-paced delivery of information and overall story development. The onslaught of legal terminology may also suffocate the comprehension of those spectators unfamiliar with this type of jargon, which only intensifies the discomforting grip of befuddlement that nearly snaps the spectators' necks. Though brief, there are a few instances in which "The Lincoln Lawyer" captivates even the most confused of audience members but sadly, a few moments later, the induced disorientation subdues any hopes of continuing to follow and fathom the suspense. The savior of this film is elegantly represented by the lawyer Mickey Haller, played by Matthew McConaughey, who confidently and solidly allows the viewers to appreciate his talent in the courtroom. "The Lincoln Lawyer" is able to rid itself of capital punishment but not quite from a life sentence.
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7/10
X-Men: Business Class
25 February 2012
Warning: Spoilers
The vast array of uncanny yet stunningly entertaining mutations of the unparalleled members of the "X-Men: First Class" assemblage bond harmoniously to form a well-balanced strain of sheer enjoyment. The solid performances of both James McAvoy (Charles Xavier) and Michael Fassbender (Magneto) combine to interweave several moments of sentimental resonance that will certainly send the audience trembling with strong emotions. However, the incorporated action sequences follow the typical superhero battle formula comprising gargantuan explosions, spontaneous and bland teleportations and the trite levitation of nearly any object in the vicinity, which at times induces monotony given the repetitiousness and ridiculousness of these action choreographies. Per contra, the logical storyline smoothly and comprehensively links all past X-Men films. Though the action scenes prove to be the weaker gene, the talented performances from both McAvoy and Fassbender most definitely enmesh to restructure a previously shapeless sequence into a revitalized, cruciform helix.
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The Roommate (I) (2011)
4/10
Leighton Meester... too adorable to be horrific
25 February 2012
Warning: Spoilers
"The Roommate" poses the terrifying possibility of being paired with a mentally insane and obsessive individual in college but does so in a completely innocuous and bland manner. All of the opportunities that the film has to really stun the viewer are childishly wasted by following them up with fuzzy continuations like the removal of a colleague's belly piercing. There are at maximum, one or two moments that could tickle the spectator and try to get him to react the slightest bit to the story. The final scenes might scare the audience to the point of yawning, which is a considerable improvement from the snoring occurring in past instances of this film. Other than that the viewer could only shudder in disappointment as he imagines far more horrific alternatives to the one shown on the screen in his own mind. Those relying on the beauty of the cast to entertain them will also find disappointment since the amorous character relationships climax at a kiss on the mouth. All in all, "The Roommate" starts off with a truly sinister idea but fails to sustain this expectation.
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Get Low (2009)
7/10
A worthwhile peculiarity
25 February 2012
Warning: Spoilers
At the surface, "Get Low" converges upon the guilt-ridden life of Felix Bush, who has decided to alienate himself for over forty years in an attempt to pay for his mysterious and supposedly unpardonable crime. This reclusive lifestyle leads many folks from the nearby town to believing in a plethora of stories wherein Felix Bush is disreputably or villainously portrayed. Willing to confess to the whole community and wishing to end once and for all the tall tales that plague his name, Felix decides to arrange a funeral for himself by hiring Quinn funeral services (owned by Frank Quinn- Bill Murray) and incites the townspeople to attend by holding a raffle whose winner would inherit this pariah's shelter and land. At the funeral, Felix reveals the reason for his self-seclusion while the majority of his community tediously listens and counts down the minutes until the anxiously-awaited lottery. Brief instances later, the physical death of Felix Bush brings another funeral to life, this time with fewer but truer attendants to bid adieu to this curious hermit who died twice. "Getting lower" into the ground unveils the critique that is launched against society's unfortunate tendency to carelessly mold any type of hearsay into unchallenged fact and spread it from mind to mind, further intensifying the lie spawned by community. The initiative Felix Bush has of planning a funeral for himself while inviting all individuals who had been contaminated with one of society's lies about himself is symbolic not of his own death but the death of care and altruism that exists within the life of most individuals who exist passively in community. The rapaciousness of society is visibly accentuated by the stolid reaction of the townspeople who attend and listen to the heartfelt confession from Felix Bush and highlighted even further by their exclusive dissemination of joy only at the time of announcing the results of the raffle, which reveals their truly egotistical intentions. The contrasting alternation between the lifestyles of a common citizen from the town like Frank Quinn who seeks the profit motive and the reclusive one lead by Felix Bush shows how a life devoid of societal pressures revolves around learning to harmoniously coexist with nature's gifts- represented by the forest-covered location of Felix's shelter and his amiable interaction with the mule- and focuses on reflecting about one's past actions and learning to, above all, pardon oneself first. The revelation of Felix's darkest secret of being incapable to rescue the love of his life from the devastating flames ignited by her draconian husband emphasizes even further the pure and benign nature of an individual surviving outside the grip of communal existence. The bottom line: "Get Low" succeeds in grasping the viewers' attention right from the beginning by introducing a mysterious pariah that supposedly harms others in a variety of ways. Robert Duvall's talented performance exquisitely contributes to the audience's entertainment and the mystery sustaining this film. Though the middle acts focuses its efforts on rather tedious character interactions and Felix's secret may fail to impress those expecting a mind-blowing hit, "Get Low" is a film teeming with meaning that will never get low marks.
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4/10
After the comic high wears off, little is remembered
25 February 2012
Relentlessly abiding by Murphy's law, "The Hangover Part 2" projects the very definition of mayhem to a completely new state of hilarious catastrophe. Overflowing with opportunities to laugh at the discombobulated pack of stooges who survive through a chain reaction of disastrous occurrences, this film quickly induces a comic high that ought to last until the very end. Per contra, filtering out the humorous hallucinogen from the recipe allows the spectator to return to his senses and realize how predominantly tasteless yet slightly acerbic the overall composition of the film truly is. Though addicted to qualityless acting and purely nonsensical events, "The Hangover Part 2" is just able to make itself amusing while it lasts. There is no guarantee, however, that the audience will remember anything they saw on the following day.
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Trust (I) (2010)
8/10
A gripping warning
25 February 2012
Warning: Spoilers
"Trust" delivers a potent surge of panic and pity that expeditiously spreads across the audience at light speed. The naivete of the young female protagonist (Liana Liberato) simultaneously irks, ensnares and becomes the primal source of energy that keeps the entertainment powered throughout the whole of this intense performance. It becomes inevitable to refrain from clenching one's fists and smashing them against the armrest at the innocence of this teenage girl as she slowly awakens from her puerile revelry of a disturbing affair. Unlike the great majority of the thrillers dealing with the unrealistic and formulaic chase of a perpetrator, "Trust" closely and realistically scrutinizes the devastating potential of the virtual web in its ability to wrap around the very pillars of the contemporaneous family structure and quickly demolish everything. David Schwimmer ingeniously concludes his drama through the perspective of the sexual predator's son as he ingenuously records his insidious father casually interacting with one of his student's family members- a symbolic attempt at emphasizing the camouflaged danger and power of the digital world wherein evil lurks on the opposite side of the protective screen that separates criminal from young victim. Additionally, the director brilliantly shows the viewers how immediate peril saunters right in front of the contemporaneous youth's ignorant eyes. The character of Liana skillfully embodies and personifies this young ignorance. In sum, an emotionally grappling creation that stresses the shift that the modern criminal has made from the loud firing of gun by strongly pulling the trigger to the silent and subtle click of the mouse over the "send" trigger.
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6/10
Typical yet pleasing
25 February 2012
Warning: Spoilers
"Something Borrowed" invests its efforts towards highlighting the significance of actively pursuing one's desires by depicting the schizophrenic relationship that swings back and forth the lover and friend extrema to eventually reach the easily predictable resting point. Though some viewers may find this repetitious motion annoying and not worth bearing, the film does indeed incorporate its fair share of risible instances to create a pleasant ride to and fro this sinuous love adventure. Rachel's (Ginnifer Goodwin) timorous indecisiveness as frustrating as it may be, does however help the film become more human and thus more realistic as it sheds light on how gut-wrenchingly difficult it is to make that ultimate decision that deep inside feels righteous but on the surface it could surely breach open an unmendable gap between closest friends. All in all "Something Borrowed" lends several opportunities to laugh whilst gifting the audience with the rewards of not living as someone else's shadow.
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Bad Teacher (2011)
5/10
As much fun as taking a pop quiz
25 February 2012
"Bad Teacher" offers a rigorously amusing curriculum aimed at entertaining and preparing its students to sit through a risibly enjoyable yet unpleasantly frenzied, one hour and a half examination, which uses the insanely cutthroat competition between dementedly gratifying teachers as its core testing material. "Bad Teacher" feels a lot like being able to look into the daydreaming mind of that unbearably obstreperous classmate who rarely listens in class and focuses intensely on manufacturing near-perfect spitballs and to visualize his view of an ideal educational system. Though hilarious at first, the film overdoses itself on absurdly asinine occurrences that ought to eventually shift a veritable laugh into an artificial yet pitiful giggle intended to break the awkward silence ensuing a teacher's failed attempt at making a joke. It is evident however, how Cameron Diaz successfully and attractively fulfills her role as a disastrously funny educator along with the slightly amusing performances by Justin Timberlake and Lucy Punch. All in all, "Bad Teacher" has its fair share of laughable moments but these quickly become as much fun as taking a pop quiz.
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Hall Pass (2011)
2/10
I'll Pass
25 February 2012
Warning: Spoilers
One week, no rules, no fun. "Hall Pass" details the golden opportunity that two married men- Rick (Owen Wilson) and Fred (Jason Sudeikis)- have to wreak havoc and enjoy themselves in any shape or form possible for a full week, and above all, these fortunate individuals have their wives' approvals. What seems to be a once in a lifetime chance is tediously squandered by a morally-abiding storyline that ruthlessly eviscerates any hopes of laughing at the mischief these two vacuously avoided. Even the events leading up to the granting of the hall pass are a torturously slow and painful wait devoid of laughter. When the long-awaited time comes, the build up of expectations for a hilarious ride back into bachelor life climaxes to a loud and noisy sigh of sheer disappointment. It is however, a difficult job to create a comedy that aims to entertain under the promise of showing the wildest seven days known to mankind while attempting to somehow squeeze in a lesson of morality here and there. But if you can vicariously derive any pleasure from quotidian activities like playing videogames, golf and eating at Applebee's with close friends then by all means this is the perfect film for it. Otherwise, save yourself the time and money and discard the hall pass.
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Cars 2 (2011)
6/10
A visually dazzling drive across a "plotholed storylane"
25 February 2012
Warning: Spoilers
"Cars 2" takes us on a visually scintillating adventure across the flawlessly crafted virtual worlds of major cities including Tokyo, London and Paris where streets, landmarks, and local idiosyncrasies are captured in astounding minutiae. From the hi-tech Japanese toilets and narrowly detailed streets to the well-mimicked Arc de Triomphe, "Cars 2" proves that it comes equipped with an all-encompassing and state-of-the-art GPS navigational tool. Sadly enough, the espionage feature serves nothing more than to pose one or two extra opportunities to show off the riveting visuals with explosions here and there. Seen from another angle, it's an over- prolonged route that damages the resplendent visuals with its roughly incorporated twists and turns along the way that unfortunately inflict a painful but non-fatal whiplash injury. Thankfully, this sequel is engineered with a fully functional humoring system and lifesaving artwork that together buffer the impact of the espionage-storytelling crash. All in all, "Cars 2" is like driving alongside a beach and enjoying the view while transiting on a "plotholed storylane".
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6/10
A compatible duo of anachronisms
25 February 2012
Galloping across a universe invaded by unremitting explosions and countless shootouts, "Cowboys and Aliens" is an anachronistically entertaining film that uniquely incorporates a worthwhile hybridization between the comparatively antediluvian, gun-slinging cowboy and the more contemporaneous, laser-vomiting extraterrestrial genres. Notwithstanding, the intended mystery circumvolving the character interpreted by Daniel Craig is by no means as captivating as it should have been. In actuality, the absurd coexistence between cowboys and aliens is only constructive when applied to the moments of destruction but destructive when applied to the storyline construction.
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The Beaver (2011)
4/10
The hirsute nuisance
25 February 2012
Warning: Spoilers
The Beaver is a "prescription puppet designed to create a psychological distance between (oneself) and the negative aspects of his personality." Sadly, as time elapses and Mel Gibson's ability as a puppeteer loses its initial spark to slightly captivate in its peculiarly entertaining fashion, "The Beaver" slowly but surely spawns a tremendous psychological distance from which no spectator will ever be able to reconnect himself to the intended emotional profundity of the film. A few minor laughs are only possible in the beginning with Walter's (Mel Gibson) goofy accent and surprisingly above-the-mediocre performance. The childish puppet show apart, "The Beaver" has nothing else to offer as a drama with its lackluster depiction of a middle-aged man trying to survive a hopelessly depressed life. Family quarrels, suicide attempts and all other issues are assuaged and even made tasteless with the ridiculously persistent and continual presence of the obnoxious beaver puppet whose absurdly prolonged life may only appeal to the much, much younger spectator. Given the appropriate life span, the beaver really had the potential to give birth to a funny yet poignant film. The symbolically visual internal struggle between Walter and his alter ego, the beaver, loses the necessary seriousness since you realize an adult is wrestling with a cuddly stuffed animal. I would recommend this film to the younger spectator but given the over-the- edge mutilation and and perverseness of the final scenes it becomes difficult to pinpoint the adequate target audience since the older ones will quickly grow tired of the puerile puppetry and fail to connect to the dramatic side of this film. A word of advice, try to have as much fun as possible in the first few scenes with the beaver because he will quickly turn into a gnawing nuisance.
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