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RanchoTuVu

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380 reviews in total 
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the gridiron of 1949, 30 June 2015
8/10

A pro football player (Victor Mature) discovers his days as a pro athlete are numbered when he learns that he has a heart condition. His wife (Lizabeth Scott) has ridden his fame as the face of the franchise up into the upper echelons of society and is unprepared to take on the role of a wife of an assistant coach for a college team since this is the best option left open to her husband given his condition. So the questions are will Mature die on the gridiron or start coaching and dump his socialite aspiring wife, or will she dump him. Lizabeth Scott is perhaps the best reason for watching, as she's in one or two excellent scenes of parties put on and attended by the crowd she would like to join, though there are some telling moments on the field and in the locker room, especially when a veteran lineman gets cut from the team and has limited future prospects. The film does well in portraying the lives and limited careers of pro football players, maybe better than later films have done. The nuances are brought to life by the great director Jacques Tourneur

T for Trouble, 2 June 2015
8/10

Robert Hooks as Mr. T is a skilled and licensed private eye with contacts in the underground gambling scene (higher stakes crap games) in 1970s Los Angeles. He's cool enough to have both the crooks and the cops trying to figure out what his next move will be. He finds out about an intense competition for the illicit gambling business between a faction led by an impressively sleazy Ralph Waite and his seemingly junior partner played by Paul Winfield and another cool character named Big (Julius Harris) who operates the other syndicate. The viewer is let in on the plot early on and sits back while Mr. T inevitably figures things out. The black actors play tough parts but so do Waite and the white actors who play his protection, wielding some nifty looking sawed off shotguns. The movie is directed with a pace that moves along well by Ivan Dixon, though some of the stuff Mr. T pulls off is a bit too cool to be believed. But most of Trouble Man looks to be shot on actual locations in the classic color cinematography of the 1970s on some neat locations in LA.

when the people elected you governor, they also elected your conscience, 18 May 2015
7/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Perhaps if the halfway house the Hoodlum Priest envisioned as a way of diverting ex-cons away from criminality and recidivism had been built in time, Keir Dullea wouldn't have died in Missouri's gas chamber in one of most memorable execution scenes ever. The movie starts with Dullea's release from prison and reunion with a former partner in crime. They plot a robbery of a St. Louis strip joint in a seedy part of the city. Don Murray as the Hoodlum Priest offers another avenue for Dullea, and it looks good for him after he meets the daughter of one of the city's wealthy families at a cool poolside party where Murray solicits contributions for the nation's first halfway house from St. Louis's wealthy matrons. Pushing the other side of the agenda is not law enforcement but a newspaper reporter who's job is to sensationalize crime in order to sell more papers and generate ad revenue. It's all well-captured and presented, though a bit preachy at times, in authentic scenes from the streets of St. Louis by should-be-better-known director Irvin Kershner.

Judy Holliday meets Thomas Jefferson, 4 May 2015
8/10

Broderick Crawford plays a self-made scrap iron magnate who owns a string of junkyards, while his mistress Judy Holliday is a former chorus line dancer, whom Crawford assumes (erroneously) is his social and intellectual inferior. Their arrival into a posh Washington DC hotel, on a mission to bribe a congressman, attracts the attention of a reporter played by William Holden. For whatever reason Crawford hires Holden to educate Holliday so that she'll be socially ready to entertain our nation's political elites. It's a ridiculous assumption on Crawford's part as it's clear he's the one who really needs tutoring. Of course Holliday and Holden fall in love with each other as he leads her intellectual awakening by taking her on tours of the town (the Jefferson Monument figures prominently) and feeds her a steady supply of reading materials. It leads to Holliday's realization of what a brute Crawford actually is, and he truly is as he definitely knew how to play a certain kind of ignorant and menacing type of character. This all seems to be a kind of feminist awakening in the face of macho tyranny, which is a grand experience to behold in Holliday's portrayal.

admirable portrayal of the situation, 20 April 2015
8/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

World War II era Mardi Gras in New Orleans complete with confetti, parades, and streamers, where a well-healed daughter of a scholar on the Mayas meets and has an "indiscretion" with a soldier about to be shipped out to fight in the war. The real drama comes after the baby arrives and the meaning of the film's title becomes clearer, as the older sister of the young woman convinces her that she and her husband could raise the baby as their own and everyone would believe she and her husband were the baby's biological parents. The story moves from New Orleans to New York with a stop at a ranch in Arizona, the young sister (Nancy Coleman) finds the emotional attachment to her baby is stronger than she expected and forces the older sister to hold her to her promise, which is the angle that really motivates the movie. Edgar Ulmer again admirably delivers in this sophisticated portrayal of the situation.

classic look at the post-war South, 8 April 2015
9/10

A man recalls memories of his childhood growing up as the adopted son (Dean Stockwell) of a parson (Joel McCrea) and the parson's wife (Ellen Drew) in a southern town in the years after the Civil War. The director, Jacques Tourneur, portrays a wholesome family image but darker forces are also present, such as the bull-whipping Perry Lokey played by menacing Jack Lambert, who practices his whip handling skills on a character with the name Chloroform (Arthur Hunnicutt) while the townspeople laugh along as if it's OK to terrorize someone by cracking your bullwhip inches over his head. Ed Begley also has a less than nice-guy part, trying to cheat freed slave Juano Hernandez out of his land. It's Joel McCrea as the parson who preserves decency and serves as a reminder to the viewers that the Bible and the recurring Christian hymn "Stars In My Crown" saved the town from the night-riders or Ku Klux Klan who make an appearance late in the film. A sub-plot is the romance that develops between the son of the town's dying doctor (who is a doctor himself and is taking over the business from his father) and the town's school teacher, played by a surprisingly remarkable Amanda Blake. Overall a solid portrayal of inherent goodness and generosity.

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
kind of disappointing, 7 April 2015
7/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

A Greek national living in New York happens to be a witness to a mob hit and must flee the city for a sleepy little town. He meets a woman (Barbara Eden) on the train ride to the small town. The mob has tentacles that reach within the NYPD and the hit men are alerted to the town as well. Thus it's Eden, who drives an extinct Sunbeam convertible and the hit men, one of whom is rather memorably played by Gavin Macleod, who drive around in a huge De Soto. It's worth mentioning the cars because the director Edward L. Cahn, somehow failed in this effort to create much tension or action, although things get a little dicey when Macleod and his partner start slapping Barbara Eden around. Overall a disappointment, especially considering the cinematographer was the great Floyd Crosby. Still, hats off to Edward L. Cahn for making at least somewhat cool movies destined for the drive-ins and the out-of-the-way and extinct theaters.

the war is over but gold continues the fight, 27 March 2015
6/10

Though the War Between The States has officially ended, a group of Confederate soldiers continues to fight for their own cause, laying siege to a small group of Union soldiers holed up in a farmhouse who are guarding a substantial amount of gold coins for a federal agent. The story comes off okay in this noticeably low-budget effort thanks to all the personalities this film features. The presence of all that gold seems to affect all of them in interesting ways. The farm owner is a Union army vet who converted to pacifism after experiencing the war, while his wife is trying to attract the Union commander who is trying to protect the gold from both his men and the Confederates, who include some strange characters, one of which is Ted Knight. The film is more drama than action which is perhaps because the action scenes are not too great, but the drama is barely passable enough to at least kind of keep one watching.

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
remarkably well-done plot, 26 March 2015
7/10

A London psychiatrist (Robert Newton) catches his wife (Sally Gray) in an affair with an American (Phil Brown). Apparently this is not her first affair, and Newton, as the objective and self-controlled psychiatric professional, decides to settle things in a well-thought-out way by first kidnapping and then imprisoning the American in a hidden room not too far removed from the actual residence, with the ultimate goal of killing him without leaving any incriminating traces. The film could have been more dramatic by playing up the relationship between Newton and the beautiful Sally Gray. Gray seems to be telling the viewer that Newton never really loved her, although it also seems as if her youth and passion were too much for his middle-aged character to handle. In any event the plot, which is remarkably well done, inevitably leads to a police or Scotland Yard type investigation and eventual solving of the crime, rather than a dark story.

5 out of 6 people found the following review useful:
ultimate bad run episode, 16 March 2015
10/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Glenn, Eugene, Tara, and Noah accompany Alexandria's Aiden and Nicholas on a horribly ill-fated run to an electronics warehouse in order to obtain equipment necessary to keep Alexandria's electric power grid functioning. The run to the warehouse goes bad when Aiden shoots a walker who was military and is dressed in combat outfit and carrying grenades, one of which explodes. At that point chaos slowly ensues, making this perhaps TWD's greatest action-gorefest of the entire series. Aiden goes first, ripped apart as he's impaled but still alive and impossible to rescue, and then the ultimate gut-wrenching and gory death-by-zombie attack occurs when Noah is trapped and ripped to pieces, in a zombie death as revolting and simultaneously sad, I might add, as any death on the show. Within Alexandria there seems to be a dark undercurrent that is endangering the community from within. It isn't clear what the cause is, whether it's Deanna, who seems reasonable, or whatever, but it's a town with some kind of secret that's going to be revealed in the season's final two episodes. I'd have to rate this a ten-star episode if any there ever were, right up there with when Sofia came out of the barn.


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