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alifanova

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A Ghost Story, 18 November 2015
8/10

When you are with Terrence Malick, abandon your popcorn and prepare to see deeper.

Characters in the movie are balancing on the thin line between reality and illusion. "Her rich inner world", they say - however, so often it's a masking cover for an unseen desert, scorched earth, such as Marina carries inside. She is dancing yet inward she is struggling to breathe, let alone to speak out. She cannot give love to Neil or her own daughter because there's nothing left to give. She sincerely is trying, but once her soul was ripped out, perhaps a long time ago, it will not be reborn from nothing and it can't be helped. Same with padre - burned from the inside, nothing's left. Ghosts rather than people.

And maybe - just maybe - we could make an effort that our loved ones never become ghosts like that. Rise to the wonder with them in every little thing we do, celebrate each moment of true emotion. Be humans.

Platoon (1986)
49 out of 55 people found the following review useful:
Hell is the impossibility of reason, 10 June 2010
10/10

Why I think Platoon is probably the best war movie Hollywood ever made? Because it's very humane. I mean it. The director sees all his characters as victims of war rather than heroes or villains. Have a closer look at 'em.

Taylor has no power inside himself and is torn between the two fathers; he ends up with a physical act of revenge. This is not what one father taught him - and the other father is actually murdered by him.

Sgt. Barnes would never fit the postwar life and knew it damn too well himself; after all, he is not a fool although might seem a senseless killing machine at first sight. Vietnamese bullets could not kill him, his talent for survival being his enemy. So, he attempts kinda suicide twice (at least) begging others to kill him and thus end the pain tearing him from inside: first, in the potheads' bunker scene after Taylor's accusations; then, when Taylor finds him in the final scene.

Sgt. Elias was far too good to survive the Nam and maybe even challenged and annoyed lifers on purpose, waiting for some bob barnes to hit back :) It's a pity Stone excluded the stars' scene monologue which explains pretty much about Elias' ways and view of the future. In fact, for himself he sees no future. Not in this world that is all about betrayal and killing.

Bunny and Junior, one the embodiment of somewhat sadistic bravery and the other of cowardice. Their deaths are partly a morality, partly to show that it does not matter if you're black or white, brave or cowardly, war makes no difference wiping off everyone it can.

King, Big Harold, Francis are survivors yet victims, too. What is awaiting them in the "real" world where nobody understands and nobody respects anything? They are dreaming of a comeback to music, girlfriends, fun time - but reality bites, and who knows, will they find their spot under the sun or will be forced to use the skills obtained in the Nam and get engaged in crime and drug abuse?

Red O'Neill talking about his ability to predict if a guy is gonna make it or not. A reflection of his own fears: shall I stay alive and get out of here or not. The odds are that he is not, and Stone nails him to the place with Captain's order to take over what was once the Platoon... Bye Patsy.

The idea that Stone has been trying to bring forward to us is NOT (to my mind) a story of struggle between the good and the bad for the possession of Taylor's soul (remember, the boy became a murderer in the end), but: where is war there can be no escape. Leave hope everyone who enters.

Highest rate ever for that.