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Pacific Palisades: End Game (1997)
Season 1, Episode 13
Michelle Stafford's hotness is a key drawing card concerning "Pacific Palisades."
16 November 2011
Warning: Spoilers
The (alas) short-lived prime-time soap "Pacific Palisades" had a lot going for it: an attractive cast, marvelously kitschy melodrama, plenty of sex, a deliciously fast pace. Yet chief among its assets, the central reason to embrace it (and to lament the fact that it didn't last) is...Michelle Stafford. That young woman was, quite simply, the best thing to happen to prime-time soap since Jamie Luner sashayed onto the "Melrose Place" scene. With her plush, flowing brown-reddish hair, her probing, sparkling eyes, and her lush, intensely kiss-worthy lips, she certainly, definitely gave Jamie a run for her money in the allure department. Her elegant beauty, her classy charm, and her effortless vivaciousness were the factors that powered the show and made it stick in the mind, as, quite frankly, it still does. Whether she was getting it on with her always-willing husband or sparring with her rebellious younger sister (who was eventually revealed to actually be her daughter), our Michelle kept the pot boiling and the energy level high. It's been said that our girl is set to leave her popular daytime soap "The Young and the Restless." If so, it will mark a second time one of the most gorgeous, sexiest, most altogether drool-inducing she-babes has departed the airwaves.
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Baywatch: Golden Girls (1997)
Season 7, Episode 21
Nancy Valen's babeliciousness carries the episode.
1 November 2011
Warning: Spoilers
The "Baywatch" episode "Golden Girls" is basically fueled by one main factor: Nancy Valen's babeliciousness. As Baywatch Captain Samantha Thomas, her majestic brunette hair, her all-embracing smile, and her drool-encouraging body make her really and truly a stand-out figure. Whether she's in her standard captain's uniform of white shirt, black skirt, and black heels or in the regulation Baywatch red swim suit, she effortlessly brings forth not only panting but a yearning to spend as much quality time with her as possible. She undoubtedly puts the "hot" in the phrase "she-hottie." If Pamela Anderson was, as "Baywatch" co- executive producer Gregory J. Bonann claimed in his best-selling retrospective "'Baywatch': Rescued From Prime Time," the most uninhibited member of the "Baywatch" cast as far as her body was concerned, Nancy Valen is the girl who makes you wish that she was. In point of fact, of all the Hasselhoff chicks, Nancy Valen is the one who comes to mind the fastest when memory turns to Australian songbird Olivia Newton-John's 1980s musical entreaty "Let's Get Physical."
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Profiler: House of Cards (2000)
Season 4, Episode 16
Jamie Luner's hotness is the drawing card.
28 October 2011
Warning: Spoilers
The key drawing card in the "House of Cards" episode of "Profiler" is, as usual, Jamie Luner as continuing character Rachel Burke. Her sultry good looks, her volcanic sexiness, and her unstoppable energy once again make her stand out and cause her to be the leading reason to watch. She unquestionably continues the sexy tradition she established when she essayed the role of Lexi Sterling, Heather Locklear's nemesis on the classic prime-time soap "Melrose Place." On "Profiler," even though she's in a completely different milieu, she keeps on swaying and sizzling to heart-stopping effect. It was People Magazine that once asserted: "It is impossible to think of Ellen Barkin without thinking of sex." In all honesty, when the mind turns to Jamie Luner, said subject certainly, definitely makes itself present.
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Robin Givens is, as usual, the highlight of the film.
28 October 2011
The theatrical picture "Foreign Student" is, looked at on its own, a sensitive and often moving film. The atmosphere of 1950s Virginia is skillfully re-created, the performances, are for the most part, incisive and stirring, and the script is tender and refreshingly non- melodramatic, allowing the proceedings to evolve in a mature and realistic way. Yet for all that, all this, the greatest plus, the most positive element is--drum roll, please--Robin Givens. As April, the local schoolteacher who also works as a domestic, she deftly creates a soulful and sexual woman. We immediately see why French exchange student Phillipe is drawn to her, why he falls in love with her. Indeed, we rather envy the young Parisian for being able to hook up with such a sexy and mature and quietly passionate girl. And when, at the end, they part and April leaves him a warm and loving good-bye note ("To Phillipe. All my love. Always. April"), we genuinely feel Phillipe's satisfaction at having had such a gorgeous and caring and fully-rounded lover. It is Robin's graceful beauty, her smoldering sexiness, and her classy intelligence that make her such an admirable love object and cause her to be the high point of the picture. When People Magazine did a story on her during the 1980s, it quoted her as contending that her long-range plans included more parts for "wholesome black girls--we don't have many female heroes in that vein." Robin Givens's character in "Foreign Student" may not be "wholesome," but through her smooth good looks and stylish sex appeal, she is certainly, definitely a "female hero" for black girls and, in fact, for girls of all races.
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Once again, Robin Givens provides the sex and the sizzle in "Enemies Among Us."
27 October 2011
By and of itself, "Enemies Among Us" is a sprightly and, within its boundaries, tense film. It deals quite adroitly with the issues of international terrorism, political maneuvering, and American political complicity in international nefariousness. Yet the reason to savor it, the cause to exult in it is, as usual, Robin Givens. Although she is not in any sense the star of the picture--indeed, she really and truly doesn't have that many scenes--her role as government interrogator and former cop's wife Gloria genuinely stands out through her free-flowing sexiness, her sizzling intelligence, and her crisp authoritativeness. When she's leading the questioning of her and her colleagues' international soldier/prisoner, her smooth forcefulness and her graceful sex appeal have us riveted to her. When she's on the phone dealing with her uniformed cop ex (Eric Roberts), her sass and her spirit put us immediately on her side. And when she orders that said soldier/prisoner be "terminated"--translation: killed--after five minutes, her beauty and her suavity prevent us from being repulsed. The lady herself has asserted, concerning the quality she seeks in a mate: "I want someone who can handle me. And I'm not the easiest person to handle." Robin Givens's performance in "Enemies Among Us" puts us in a mood to gladly want to attempt to handle her--and to be fully excited regarding the challenge.
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Beverly Hills Madam (1986 TV Movie)
Robin Givens makes a sexy and stimulating acting debut in "Beverly Hills Madam."
27 October 2011
The made-for-television film "Beverly Hills Madam" has two major assets. One is the rich amount of absolutely stunning she-babes--Donna Dixon, Terry Farrell--who sashay throughout said production. The other is the positively smashing acting debut of Robin Givens. As one of high-class madam Faye Dunaway's leading prostitutes--the picture's older "Tootie," as it were--Robin makes a definite (favorable) impression. When her character, April Baxter, is canoodling with an older black man, one of Dunaway's customers, we immediately get why the black man is so quickly drawn to her. When we see April at her dance class going through her moves (her ultimate ambition is to be a dancer), her swaying and grooving instantly excite us. And when she's brutally murdered near the end of the film, we effortlessly join in Dunaway's grief for her and with equal effortlessness fully understand why April's murder makes her want to leave being a madam behind. Really and truly, the svelte beauty, the high-gloss charm, and the polished sexiness we've come to admire in Robin was apparent in her professional coming-out. When People Magazine did a story on her around the time "Beverly Hills Madam" was telecast, it quoted her as asking: "(I)f I'm supposed to be so sexy, why don't I have a date?" and concluded its piece by asserting: "Good question, although you somehow get the feeling that she shouldn't be adding her scorecard up just quite yet."Robin Givens's professional debut clearly heralded the fact that this was somebody who would go on to deserve to have a brimming scorecard.
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Head of State (2003)
Robin Givens's hotness nicely balances Chris Rock's funniness.
25 October 2011
In the theatrical film "Head of State," Chris Rock is the comedy drawing card, earning plenty of laughs in his role as an alderman running a pre-arranged campaign for President. As co-writer, he helps provide quite a lot of funny times for himself and his comedic cohort, Bernie Mac. As director, he orchestrates the comedic goings-on with a sure and knowing hand, always making sure the proceedings never get too out-there. Yet there is another reason to savor "Head of State," a second factor in making said picture memorable. And that's Robin Givens's portrayal of Rock's ex. As Kim, she employs her high-toned beauty, her poised sexiness, and her unstoppable energy to create a portrait of a greedy, grasping, entirely opportunistic witch whom it is an absolute pleasure to be against. Thanks to her good looks and appeal, she is a bad girl whom it is a fervent delight to see being bad. Her smooth charm and unquenchable hotness nicely balance Rock's "homeboy" funniness and streetwise dynamism. She makes a really and truly worthy adversary for the star. It has been reliably reported that there was initial resistance to casting her in her first cinematic triumph "Boomerang" because there was fear that audiences would boycott said film out of dislike for "The Most Hated Woman in America." Robin Givens's performance in "Head of State" clearly shows that she is the kind of actress who deserves in demand from now until the end of time.
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"Restraining Order" draws power from Robin Givens's sensitive portrayal.
25 October 2011
"Restraining Order," on its own, is a powerful and often moving film. Reggie Gaskins makes an ingratiating and positively manly lawyer/hero. Sean Blakemore contributes alternating fire and sensitivity to his role as the picture's abusive husband. Gaskins's script is forceful and deftly builds suspense, and, as director, he deftly creates an ever- increasing mood of tension. Yet towering above it all, making the greatest impression is Robin Givens's performance as abused wife Diane McNeil. In her early scenes with Gaskins, she makes us feel her closeness and affection for him. In her scenes with Blakemore, she has us believing that her life with him has been sheer hell. And when she breaks down and acknowledges that her claims that she has been repeatedly abused by him were exaggerated out of her frustration that she "wasn't happy," her vulnerability and incisiveness has us not only not hating her but wanting to reach out our arms to her (Also: She fills her scenes with her son with motherly warmth and familial love). Such films as "Boomerang" and "Head of State" and "Flip the Script" have freely displayed Robin's rich talent for comedy. "Restraining Order," like her made-for-TV flick "The Penthouse," openly shows off her chops as a dramatic actress. And all of the aforementioned films clearly prove that Robin Givens deserves to be known not as "The Most Hated Woman in America" but as "The Most Talented Black Woman in America."
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Robin Givens makes an already funny and charming film funnier and more charming.
23 October 2011
"Flip The Script," by and of itself, is an intensely humorous and greatly likable film. The male actors, led by Miguel A. Nunez, Jr., are deftly engaging and earn quite a lot of hearty laughs. The script by Tia Yoka McMillan gives the actors a large amount of funny business to handle. Terrah Bennett Smith, as director, always keeps the proceedings amiably light and chugging along. Yet the leading drawing card, the Number One attraction is Robin Givens's performance as Rain Jones. From her very first scene, where she adroitly juggles (concealed) awakened passion and (feigned) off-hand casualness during her telephone conversation with Nunez' character through ingratiatingly interacting with her "homegirl" buddy, portrayed by Jazmin Lewis, to where she at last openly and movingly acknowledges to Nunez the love she has always felt for him and agrees to marry him, Robin hits all the right notes. It is her plush beauty, her stylish charm, and her high-class intelligence that have us rooting for her and that easily make her the most appealing and sympathetic character in the picture. It is this flick, "Boomerang," and her made-for-TV film "The Penthouse" that clearly prove that Robin Givens is fully deserving of the title of Ms. Contemporary Black Hollywood.
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Robin Givens alone--repeat, alone--makes "Little Hercules in 3-D" worth seeing.
21 October 2011
"Little Hercules in 3-D" is, to be blunt about it, ABSOLUTELY AWFUL. The premise--young Hercules comes to Earth from Mt. Olympus and is befriended by a black kid and his mother--is not only fully unbelievable but downright juvenile, the performances--with literally one exception, which will ultimately be gotten into--range from grandstanding (Hulk Hogan as young Herc's father) to flat-out horrid (Judd Nelson as an official at the school said black kid and young Herc attend), and the script would not cut the mustard even as an episode of a Saturday- morning live-action series. However, as mentioned, there is one, and only one exception, as far as the acting is concerned, and that alone-- alone--is the drawing card. That exception is, namely, Robin Givens as the black youth's mother. As Dana, she offers her usual amounts of sprightly charm, high-gloss sexiness, and glittering intelligence. When she's standing with Nelson's high-school official and dealing with Herc's dad, we envy Nelson for having such a qualitative ally. When Dana squares off against young Herc's scheming mother (when the latter asks Dana what her game is, the former replies: "Trying to stop you--one mother to another"), we feel young Herc should be wholly grateful to have such an appealing advocate. Really and truly, when Robin Givens is on-screen during "Little Hercules in 3-D," a sow's ear becomes not only a silk purse but an entire uptown ensemble.
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Blankman (1994)
Robin Givens provides the sexiness in "Blankman."
19 October 2011
In "Blankman," Damon Wayans provides the laughs as a nerdy inventor who, through use of gadgets he's devised in his own home, becomes a costumed superhero who "heroically" rescues his hometown from corrupt influences. Yet it's Robin Givens as intrepid TV journalist Kimberly Jonz who gives said flick its charm and its sex appeal. As the reporter who breaks the story of Blankman and serves as the film's Lois Lane, she deftly employs her stylish beauty, her high-toned sexiness, and her stiletto-sharp intelligence to create an intensely desirable counterbalance to Wayans's out-there funniness. When Wayans, after having spent an evening with Robin's Kimberly, tells his ever-dubious brother, portrayed by David Alan Grier: "When she (Kimberly) stuck her tongue down my throat, it was only there a few minutes," a considerable part of us fiercely wishes that we could have been in his shoes. In sum, while Damon Wayans is undoubtedly the comedic center of "Blankman," Robin Givens, as the film's aforementioned ace reporter, proves once again that she is without question the queen of the black celebrity/entertainment world.
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Melrose Place: Lexi Gets Stiffed (1999)
Season 7, Episode 33
Jamie Luner's babeliciousness reigns supreme.
18 October 2011
Heather Locklear had always been "the cat among the pigeons," to employ the legendary "Melrose Place" head honcho Aaron Spelling's phrase, but in "Lexi Gets Stiffed," Jamie Luner gave her, as she almost always had, a run for her money. Jamie was, quite simply, the most beautiful, sexiest, most altogether alluring woman in the prime-time-soap world. With her flaming red hair, her come-hither-AND-NOW stare, and her steamy, sultry voice, she never failed to be a drool-worthy, heartbeat- quickening, pant-inducing turn-on. Whether she was dueling with Heather, luring a "Melrose" man into her sexual web, or just sizing up a situation with her piercing pussycat eyes, Jamie always incited thoughts of lust and desires to be horizontal with her (with both parties bare- ass-naked, of course). The earlier Spelling prime-time soap "Savannah" marked her debut in said genre, but as Lexi Sterling in "Melrose," she had the perfect forum for her slinky looks, her barstool-veteran charm, and her unvarnished sexiness. The lady herself once said: "You can sleep with a blonde, you can sleep with a brunette, but you'll never get any sleep with a redhead." Suffice it to say that Jamie Luner was certainly, definitely one redhead with whom it would have been an absolute joy not to get any sleep.
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Once again, Robin Givens's hotness is the drawing card.
18 October 2011
"The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air" was, in sum, a silly, shallow, basically empty-headed sitcom that was absolutely undeserving of Will Smith (how he must be overjoyed that his dismal days being in that stinker are over). However, the episode "Cold Feet, Hot Body" was a genuine stand-out, and, as usual, it was Robin Givens who made it so. Her lush beauty, her plush sexiness, and her dazzling energy honestly powered the episode and made it wholly memorable. As Denise, she made a thoroughly, totally thrilling lure and made one dying to be in Smith's shoes. When he turned her down (!), the viewer really and truly felt like yelling out: "Hey, if he's not interested, I am! Give me a try!" Her mouth-watering vamping of Smith's character made the heart race and the pulse intensify. It was that episode that signaled Robin's emergence as the modern-day celebrity/entertainment world's leading black pearl. And, contrary to the famous song of the same name, she, thank Heaven, absolutely escaped being in the background.
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Robin Givens alone saves "Jackie Collins's Hollywood Wives: The New Generation"
17 October 2011
It was The New York Times that termed Marlon Brando and Al Pacino the rescuers of bad films. Well, as with many things The Times had it dead wrong. The person who actually deserves that title is Robin Givens. And she abundantly proves that she merits it in "Jackie Collins's Hollywood Wives: The New Generation." The only other factor concerning "Generation" that makes it worthy is a generous display of female skin (Best example: During one scene where Robin's character, Kyndra, and Farrah Fawcett's character, Lissa, are getting "a midnight massage," we- -hurrah!--see more of the former's smokin' bod than the latter's). But, again, Robin is present and, again, she is just about the only worthwhile element of this stinker. Despite the thinnish characterizations, the mostly-amateurish dialogue, and the crawling pace, Robin's uptown charm, her svelte sexiness, and her keen intelligence shine through and, along with the considerable amount of exposed female bodies and a smattering of incisive dialogue, prevent "Generation" from achieving absolute badness. Really, the producers of "Generation" should have told her what Candace Bergen told the clutch of TV-newswomen guest-stars after they appeared on her "Murphy Brown" sitcom: "You saved our ass."
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The Penthouse (1989 TV Movie)
Robin Givens by herself lifts "The Penthouse."
17 October 2011
"The Penthouse" is, to come out with it, the best damn made-for-TV film ever, and the reason for that is...Robin Givens. As Dinah St. Clair, the pampered, sheltered young she-babe held captive in her penthouse apartment by a psychopathic ex (David Hewlett), she never, ever fails to supply what's needed--warm-welcome charm in her early scenes with Hewlett, frightened-hostage terror when he reveals himself, steady calm in her negotiating scenes with him, forceful advocacy when going to bat for him during her telephone scene with the police, searing anger when she employs reverse psychology with him, and, finally, heartfelt grief when she sees him gunned down by a police marksman. And at all times-- repeat, at all times--she looks positively scrumptious, especially since she spends almost the entire picture lusciously barefoot. The other actors--Hewlett, Robert Guillaume as her father, Donnelly Rhodes and Cedric Smith as the negotiating lieutenant and the police commissioner, respectively--are all able and professional but, in the end, what makes "The Penthouse" a great, great made-for-television film is the fact that Robin applies her monumental charm and sexiness in the first scene and doesn't let up during the course of the entire picture.
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Baywatch: Someone to Baywatch Over You (1994)
Season 5, Episode 7
Kathleen Kinmont's hotness balances her abrasiveness.
14 October 2011
Warning: Spoilers
In the "Baywatch" episode, "Someone to Baywatch Over Me," Lorenzo Lamas- Jere Burns ex Kathleen Kinmont portrays Morgan Christopher, a gorgeous but (at first) hard-nosed FBI agent assigned to work as a Baywatch lifeguard in order to keep tabs on a major criminal's girlfriend. Throughout half the episode, Morgan is openly scornful not only of Mitch (star David Hasselhoff) but the entire beach culture, openly telling Mitch: "I don't like being in this so-called 'uniform' any more than you like me being in it," and at one point mockingly remarking to him that he should go off and "play in the sand, be a bandit with the babes." Eventually Morgan drops her snideness and discloses to Mitch the reason for it--her father was a ne'er-do-well surfer who "was always chasing the next big wave, the next pretty girl" and his walking out on his family "broke my heart--and my mother's," thus ever since she hasn't been "fond of the beach boys"--but what makes the episode--and Kathleen's character--bearable is her unstoppable hotness. Not only does she look BITCHIN' in her "Baywatch" bathing suit, but she radiates a passion and a sexiness that never fails to hold attention. Even when her character is being uber-crass--and certainly, definitely later when she shelves her hostility and is warm to Mitch--her undeniable babeliciousnesss always brings forth the drooling. Really and truly, this "Baywatch" episode is a case of crudity being offset by monumental sexiness.
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Into the Blue (2005)
"Into the Blue" is swimming in hotness.
6 September 2011
Warning: Spoilers
When "Into the Blue" was first released, The New York Times, remaining ever true to its political-correctness dogma, dismissed it as irrelevant. Disregard. "Into the Blue," in reality, is a sexy, stylish, well-paced beach-side/underwater thriller that is positively laden with visual appeal. For the women, there's Paul Walker, showing off an absolutely drool-worthy set of abs and pecs in his Speedos and in his frequently-open shirts (and with his monumentally handsome puss freely displayed in mouth-watering close-ups). For us men, there are (sigh) Jessica Alba and Ashley Scott, lookin' good, good, GOOD in their bikinis and their tank tops and their tight jeans (and there's one SMOKIN' shot of our Ashley lying upon a boat topless with a pant-inducing view of her scrumptious bare feet). For those who just like good acting, there's Scott Caan and Josh Brolin, marvelously roguish and marvelously chilling, respectively, as Walker and Alba's questionable lawyer friend and "Blue"'s chief bad guy. The plot has something to do with Walker/Alba/Caan/Scott trying to retrieve some sunken treasure and Brolin resorting to murder and kidnapping in order to stop them, but, hey, the plot is certainly, definitely not the point. With "Into the Blue," skinthusiasts of both sexes have a near-pitch-perfect opportunity to settle in, sit back and soak up the eminently gorgeous flesh-and- blood scenery.
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Wild Things (1998)
Denise Richards's sexiness powers "Wild Things."
3 September 2011
Warning: Spoilers
"Wild Things" has been termed a "skinematic classic" and seldom has a title been more apt. The film is indeed steaming-hot, capital S. In the opening-credits sequence, Matt Dillon and Neve Campbell are billed above the title, with Denise Richards named just afterward. Although this suits where her career was at that point, in another way it's a misnomer, for she's the one who puts the sizzle into the picture. Her saucy beauty, her high-school-cheerleader charm, and her fiery sexiness (not to mention her eminently drool-worthy bod) effortlessly energize the flick and give it sass and spice, most certainly, definitely in that by-now-iconic champagne-pouring three-way between her, Dillon, and Campbell and that equally-legendary girl-on-girl-in-the-pool action between her and Campbell (Also of great help: Theresa Russell's firmly pant-inducing sashaying and swaying as Richards's high-society mother). The film has inspired three, count 'em, three sequels, but it's Denise who makes the original continue to stand tall. Our girl has freely exhibited her carnality in other films ("Drop Dead Gorgeous," "Blonde and Blonder") but it's in "Wild Things" where she best displays her hotness. She really and truly has the kind of babeliciousness that causes major automobile collisions.
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"Basic Instinct" triumphs mostly because of Sharon Stone's sexuality.
2 September 2011
Warning: Spoilers
"Basic Instinct" had homosexual activists, and some feminists, screaming bloody murder but, in truth, it stands as one of the hottest, sexiest, most visually appealing films of the 1990s. Yes, Michael Douglas gave a skillfully volcanic and focused performance as loose-cannon cop Nick "Shooter" Curran. Yes, Jeanne Tripplehorn gave off marvelous heat and marvelous warmth as Douglas's psychiatrist/hate-sex co-conspirator. Yes, Joe Eszterhas's script gave the principal actors plenty of opportunities to strike plenty of sexual sparks with each other. Yet the picture's Number One attraction, its lead draw was...Sharon Stone. As novelist/murder suspect/sexual carnivore Catherine Trammell, she crackled and sizzled, burned and undulated, swayed and steamed. She was sexy, sultry, seductive, forceful, and passionate, luring us along with Douglas's hapless investigating police detective into her web. She unquestionably deserves to be placed alongside "Body Heat"'s Kathleen Turner and "Sea of Love"'s Ellen Barkin in the annals of genuinely great femme fatales. One of said homosexual activists actually had the gall, in protesting the flick, to carry a sign saying "(Douglas's acting-legend father) Kirk would be ashamed." Sharon Stone has absolutely no reason to be ashamed of her performance in "Basic Instinct." It effortlessly and deftly brings forth monumental sexual arousal.
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Body Heat (1981)
"Body Heat" generates oodles and oodles of sexual heat.
2 September 2011
Warning: Spoilers
"Body Heat" is widely seen as a classic in the area of erotic cinema and it should be. It was without a doubt the sexiest, sultriest, most outright sensuous film that was made in the 1980s. And, even today, there is absolutely no picture, with the exceptions of "Boomerang" and "Getting Played" and "Good Luck Chuck"--albeit in entirely different ways--that can stand up to it in regard to sheer, unvarnished hotness. William Hurt and Kathleen Turner--neither of whom would ever, ever look this good again--give off one sexual spark after another as, respectively, a basically dim-bulb Miami lawyer and the POSITIVELY SMOKIN' she-babe who lures him into her trap, which is to first have him get it on with her, then, to have him kill off her very rich and very cynical husband (Richard Crenna, giving a marvelously restrained and mature performance). And Ted Danson (before he hit it big on "Cheers") and J. A. Preston are ingratiatingly goodhearted and ingratiatingly supportive as Hurt's pals. It is this flick that certainly, definitely established Turner as THE filmic femme fatale of the 1980s. Really and truly, if you partake of this picture, not only will you need to take a cold shower afterward but you just may feel like engaging in some carnal action yourself.
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Sea of Love (1989)
"Sea of Love" soars on Ellen Barkin's sexiness.
1 September 2011
Warning: Spoilers
When it was first released, "Sea of Love" was widely hailed--and in many places still is--as being Al Pacino's magnificent return to his cinematic heights. And, yes, he does indeed give a marvelously taut and tough performance, reminding us again of the fire and the electricity he's capable of summoning as an actor. John Goodman, for his part, contributes ingratiating support and ingratiating manliness as Pacino's brother investigating police officer. Director Harold Becker stylishly creates an air of urban disarray and edging-ever-closer suspense. Yet for all this, for all these positive contributions, "Sea of Love" finally succeeds because of one factor above all else: Ellen Barkin. Her lush--and entirely individualistic--beauty, her tigerish sexiness, and her coltish energy saturate the film from her very first scene and make her not only a worthy adversary for Pacino but a frequently overwhelming force. "Sea of Love" may be, as many critics claimed--and still claim-- Al Pacino's triumphant comeback, but it's Ellen Barkin, from her very first appearance, who really and truly gives it its drive, its passion, its sex appeal.
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"Good Luck Chuck" is fueled by laughs and sexiness.
31 August 2011
Warning: Spoilers
"Good Luck Chuck," to be blunt, offers the best mixture of cinematic laughs and cinematic sexiness in one film that has been presented in quite some time. Dane Cook is once again ingratiatingly funny and just plain ingratiating portraying what has become his specialty--the horn-dog with a heart of gold. Dan Fogler is marvelously randy and marvelously semi-dense as his plastic-surgeon buddy who thinks not with head or heart but with his nether regions. Jessica Alba is both sweetly warm and sweetly sexy as Cook's ultimate girl-of-his-dreams. And, to tie it all up, to provide the final attractions are the cadre of smokin'-hot she-babes whom Cook encounters--almost all in the sexual sense--on his road to Alba (although she also does a bang-up job of arousing the libido). Those she-hotties--nearly all of whom are either undressed or in various stages of it--along with Alba, gambol throughout the picture like elves through Toyland and are crucial in making "Good Luck Chuck" a monumental visual, as well as a monumentally laugh-getting, pleasure.
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Getting Played (2006 TV Movie)
"Getting Played" offers a near-perfect mix of comedy and sex.
31 August 2011
Warning: Spoilers
Let's say it right off: "Getting Played" is simply near-pitch-perfect. It blends heartfelt comedy and pulse-quickening sexiness so seamlessly that, at its end, one is left gasping with satisfaction. All the crucial components of this cinematic pleasure come together dazzlingly well. Vivica A. Fox--to her great credit reigning in her usually-annoying sistah-from-the-'hood mannerisms--Carmen Electra, and Stacey Dash are fiercely charming and fiercely sexy as the trio of L. A. she-babes who make a bet that they can seduce and conquer any man with the greatest of ease. Bill Bellamy is effortlessly manly and immediately likable as the man in question (who turns out to have a trick or two up his own sleeve). While there's a absolutely dreadful scene where Fox's character and her white agent--the former plays an actress in the flick--engage in fully garish "street" yammering, it's balanced out by this uber-spicy scene between Fox and this sexy, smiling, shirtless, oh-so-built black dude. Really and truly, "Getting Played" stands with "Boomerang" as being the sexiest, most engaging, most altogether professionally-made black film ever.
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Boat Trip (2002)
Cuba Gooding Jr.'s likability and the female stars' sexiness are the attractions here.
30 August 2011
Warning: Spoilers
The critics came down hard on this film when it was originally released-- and many still are--but in truth, "Boat Trip" is an intensely likable, appealingly energetic, throw-your-head-back funny romantic/sex comedy that is powered by two factors: Cuba Gooding Jr.'s charm and the trio of women headliners', namely Vivica A. Fox--here, bless her, completely bypassing her usual fiercely irritating "homegirl" style--Roselyn Sanchez, and Victoria Silvstedt, sexiness. Cuba, for his part, is his usual engaging self as he, with his buddy, "Saturday Night Live"'s Horatio Sanz, unwittingly boards a all-homosexual cruise, falls for said cruise's sexy and vivacious dance instructor, played by Sanchez, and, to win her, pretends to be homosexual himself. And Fox and Silvstedt deftly keep up with her on the sex-appeal scale. Really and truly, "Boat Trip" may not have been, and still may not be, the critics' darling, but it provides the rest of us with a good, laugh-getting, visually splendid time.
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Sharon Stone's sexiness is the highlight of "Basic Instinct 2"
30 August 2011
Warning: Spoilers
It was 14 years in coming, but, DAMN, was it worth the wait! "Basic Instinct 2" is here and, even better, so is Sharon Stone, again in top form as novelist/murder suspect/sexual tigress Catherine Trammell. As the aforementioned character, La Stone, this time in London, cuts a wide swath , particularly where her court-appointed psychiatrist (David Morrissey giving a stylishly mature and controlled performance) is concerned. All throughout the film, our girl is sexy, sultry, seductive, stylish, manipulative, and authoritative--all the while having us rooting for her, murder suspect or no. Really and truly, it's our Sharon who, as she did in the original, puts the fire and the sass in "Basic Instinct 2." And, as before, we're thoroughly grateful to be able to optically partake of her cooter.
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