Reviews written by registered user
Mister-UHF

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24 reviews in total 
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Gun Fever (1958)
4 out of 5 people found the following review useful:
Worth checking out., 5 November 2008
7/10

I came across this film by chance on the Encore Westerns Channel and despite its low budget and occasional slow pace, I found this to be an entertaining movie based on relationships: good, bad, strained, and warped. The black & white photography (a budgetary necessity, no doubt) and the blowing wind added to the atmosphere. Trench and Amigo are among the most bullet deserving villains around. Like a lot of the lower budget Western films of mid and late fifties, it much resembles the television Westerns of the time and might have been better off as an hour long episode.

And banned in Finland and Sweden? I suppose it would have passed if Sam and Tanana had been skinny dipping in Lake Tahoe.

3 out of 9 people found the following review useful:
Brainless bonking by the wine dark sea, 14 January 2007
2/10

Came across this picture on Encore Love while channel surfing to Encore Westerns. I watched it out of curiosity to see if the stories I had heard about it are true.

They are. The only good thing about this film is the cinematography of the Greek Isles. Otherwise, it's just a movie version of a pictorial from a men's magazine, although the script (such as it is) has a few touches of Cosmopolitan.

You'll love this film if you're into soft core porn, Darryl Hannah, or European brunettes. Otherwise, you'll find it boring or offensive. Note: at last report, 47% of female American college students were infected with human papilloma virus (HPV or genital warts) spread by the promiscuity that this picture celebrates.

4 out of 4 people found the following review useful:
Zany fun, 29 June 2005

It's been many years since I saw this show, but as I recall it was a lot of fun with a combination of slapstick humor and clever dialog. I often caught my parents laughing at it. Penelope was a wealthy fashion plate Southern gal and The Hooded Claw (now there's a name!) was always cooking up ingenious ways to destroy her (e.g., explosive pastries called "bombs-bombs") and get his grubby hands, err, claws, on her fortune. He was aided by identical twins, the Bully Brothers, who did everything in unison, even when crying "Oh no!" when a plot backfired on them. But they always failed, often due to the timely intervention of the Ant Hill Gang in a smart car long before KITT came along.

9 out of 10 people found the following review useful:
Entertaining, 1 September 2003
7/10

I came across this picture by chance on a community access cable TV channel and found it quite satisfying, much better than the usual low budget Western. It supports Republic's reputation for doing a lot on a small budget. (Before the closing credits, I could tell it was a Republic picture by the distinctive sound effect that company used for every type of gunshot.) This is the type of Western that would soon be killed off by television, but the people who made and acted in them would be kept busy in that medium. Republic Studios would go to be the home of numerous TV Westerns produced by Four Star, Revue (before it moved to Universal), and CBS (who would later purchase the studio complex).

3 out of 3 people found the following review useful:
The Incredible Egg Monster!, 19 July 2003
6/10

Although the copy of this cartoon that I saw recently on the Classic Arts Showcase (ARTS) was somewhat faded, it did show the artistic and technical skill for which the Fleischers were justly famous. It also shows the weird streak that runs through many of their films.

In this cartoon, Humpty Dumpty is not just the chatty fellow who fell off the wall, but a tyrannical king who has an insatiable appetite for gold, constantly bellows a sinister laugh, and turns cruel at the drop of a hat. He reminds me a lot of Tybo the Carrot Monster from the "Lost In Space" episode "The Great Vegetable Rebellion."

Little wonder that the Fleischers later produced "Superman" cartoons with larger than life villains and outlandish situations.

1 out of 4 people found the following review useful:
Hitch and Sam can rest in peace....., 2 January 2003
3/10

....because this film is no threat to the reputations of their movies about mobile cadavers, Hitchcock's "The Trouble With Harry," an intentional black comedy, and Peckinpah's "Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia," an even funnier unintentional comedy.

"Carry Me Back" is belabored, smutty, and despite its desperate attempts to be droll, quite unfunny. The sights and scenery are interesting, but the characters keep getting in the way. My advice: skip this antipodean loser and rent either the Hitchcock or Peckinpah films.

7 out of 14 people found the following review useful:
Flawed Telling of a Flawed Classic, 28 December 2002

This miniseries is the first of what is expected to be two or three covering all of Forsyte novels.

First, this is one of most visually opulent television productions I've ever seen. The costumes, sets, props, and photography are all first rate. Apparently Granada Television hasn't heard that such a production is supposed to be a thing of the past. As for the story itself, the series seems to be largely faithful to the books. And therein lies the rub....

Because in doing so, it concentrates heavily on Irene and Young Jolyon, two of the more despicable characters in English literature. I've yet to meet a person who's read the books and ended up liking either one. Irene marries a man she knows she doesn't love or even like, makes no attempt to do either, hates him, and then cuckolds him by having an affair with the fiancé of her innocent young friend. Young Jolyon goes wherever his hormones lead him, uncaring of the hurt such inflicts on other people. Having these two as `heroes' is an inherent flaw in the story.

Making matters worse are the acting of those parts. Gina McKee's Irene is so bland and lifeless that it's hard to imagine one man becoming obsessed with her, let alone four: Soames, Bosinney, Old Jolyon, and Young Jolyon. (The Morticia Addams makeup doesn't help either.) Rupert Graves just walks through the part of Young Jolyon; whenever emotion is called for, he just looks awkward, like a kid caught in a minor fib.

June isn't much to sing about either. Her character is irrational, adoring the father who abandoned her, quickly forgiving the friend who stole the love of her life, and blaming it all on Soames, who never lifted a finger against her. Gillian Kearney tries her best with the part, but the way it's written, the eventual result is just an annoying adolescent.

Not surprisingly, the character of Soames steals the show, but this triumph is not by default. He is the most complex and fascinating character in the series. Outwardly cold and businesslike, he is consumed by an inner desire to love and be loved. Damian Lewis brings out all of this in his skillful portrayal. The final scene, when Soames holds his infant daughter for the first time, is the most powerful and believable part of the whole series.

4 out of 6 people found the following review useful:
Overblown, but entertaining and essential for Western fans., 1 December 2002
8/10

In the trade, this film was derisively known as "Lust in the Dust" and the critics were lukewarm. The Catholic Film Office rated it "C" for "condemned," presumably due to its smoldering sexuality, and Protestant churches denounced it for Walter Huston's windbag and satirical preacher, "The Sinkiller." Just about the only people who liked it were producer David O. Selznick and the public.

By late 1980's, times had changed so much that "Duel in the Sun" was shown in the early evening on Baltimore's Channel 24, then a family-oriented station owned by a bible publisher, Thomas Nelson. It was available on video at that time from Playhouse Video, a family imprint of CBS-Fox! Today, nearly sixty years after its release, we can perhaps consider the film objectively.

In a filmed interview years later, King Vidor said that he signed on to this film expecting it to be a small scale psychological Western like the later "High Noon." However, producer Selznick, relatively young and already living in the shadow of his "Gone With the Wind," consciously or/and unconsciously tried to equal or outdo that film with this one. The result is a Western epic built upon a non-epic story, making it seem a bit grandiose or overblown. Tiomkin's grand and beautiful score for this film would seem better suited for a tale about a true epic, such as a story about the cavalry campaigns or the building of the Pacific railroads.

Inspite of itself, the core of this film is a fascinating psychological Western based on the interplay of varied and sometimes contrasting characters. The acting is excellent, a possible exception being Lionel Barrymore's hamming, which burns up the scenery like a prairie fire and is often irritating. The production values are superb and the scenes of the confrontation with the railroad should be studied by student filmmakers.



27 out of 37 people found the following review useful:
Overblown, but entertaining and essential for Western fans., 1 December 2002
8/10

In the trade, this film was derisively known as "Lust in the Dust" and the critics were lukewarm. The Catholic Film Office rated it "C" for "condemned," presumably due to its smoldering sexuality, and Protestant churches denounced it for Walter Huston's windbag and satirical preacher, "The Sinkiller." Just about the only people who liked it were producer David O. Selznick and the public.

By late 1980's, times had changed so much that "Duel in the Sun" was shown in the early evening on Baltimore's Channel 24, then a family-oriented station owned by a bible publisher, Thomas Nelson. It was available on video at that time from Playhouse Video, a family imprint of CBS-Fox! Today, nearly sixty years after its release, we can perhaps consider the film objectively.

In a filmed interview years later, King Vidor said that he signed on to this film expecting it to be a small scale psychological Western like the later "High Noon." However, producer Selznick, relatively young and already living in the shadow of his "Gone With the Wind," consciously or/and unconsciously tried to equal or outdo that film with this one. The result is a Western epic built upon a non-epic story, making it seem a bit grandiose or overblown. Tiomkin's grand and beautiful score for this film would seem better suited for a tale about a true epic, such as a story about the cavalry campaigns or the building of the Pacific railroads.

Inspite of itself, the core of this film is a fascinating psychological Western based on the interplay of varied and sometimes contrasting characters. The acting is excellent, a possible exception being Lionel Barrymore's hamming, which burns up the scenery like a prairie fire and is often irritating. The production values are superb and the scenes of the confrontation with the railroad should be studied by student filmmakers.



15 out of 21 people found the following review useful:
No cane and derby hat here., 1 December 2002
7/10

Absent from this film are Wyatt Earp, Masterson's close friend and colleague in Dodge City, and Masterson's dapper clothing, a lifelong trademark, two major flaws in the film. His avoidance of public office doesn't ring true, either. The plot itself takes considerable liberties with the truth. (The television series "Bat Masterson" was closer to the truth in spirit and sometimes in fact.)

However, McCrea's intelligent and introspective portrayal of Masterson is on the mark. The acting of him and the rest of the cast carry the film, which is saddled with uninspired direction.


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