Lists by Bufo_Calvin

a list of 50 titles
While tracking a movie's box office is fascinating, The Measured Circle is also interested in how profitable a movie is.

This list of movies making a domestic gross ("dogro") of at least $40 million in the USA in 2016 ranks them in order, based on their dogro against their rumored production budgets. Certainly there are other costs (including the not inconsiderable marketing budget) and other income (including foreign box office and merchandising), but this can give us an interesting picture.

Expect studios to look at these types of results, and sometimes greenlight projects based on them (although it's hard to resist spending a $100 million on a possible blockbuster).

Note that recent releases will typically appear lower on this list than their eventual results. If they were in the top ten the weekend before the list is updated, they will normally be marked with "and counting".

Movies where the rumored production budget is not available on IMDb (or elsewhere...we prefer using BoxOfficeMojo, which, like IMDb, is owned by Amazon, but which have dogroed at least $40m in 2016 in the USA appear at the bottom of the list. They may be more profitable than many of the movies above them, but we can't do the math on them.

As a new feature (introduced in 2013), we've decided to label movies, to make this clearer. A traditional measure of success if the dogro being twice the production budget. Using that as a starting point...

Dogro 2X production budget = "Money"
Dogro 3X production budget = "Golden" Dogro
30X production budget = "Platinum" (God's Not Dead prompted the creation of this new award)

Dogro less than 50% of production budget = "Underperformer"


Sub-40s

These movies did not make it to the list below because they did not dogro $40.0m. We will note two kinds: ones that have dogroed triple their production budget (Golden) or had a production budget of at $40.0m and have not dogroed half of their budget (Underachievers). Golden Sub-40s may appear here before their run is done and they may earn more dogro (particularly if they are nominated for or win Oscars). Underachiever Sub-40s are not added here until that status seems very likely (we will typically wait at least two months from the release date).

Golden Sub-40s

The Boy $35.8m (reported budget: $10.0m)

Projected (we are confident that these movies will appear on the list):

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them
Doctor Strange
31
Passengers
The Magnificent Seven
The Girl on the Train
Inferno
Moana
Jack Reacher: Never Go Back
The Magnificent Seven

Possible (we are less confident in these, but wouldn't be surprised if they dogro at least $40m):

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiars
Bridget Jones's Baby
The Adventures of Tintin: Prisoners of the Sun
Ben-Hur
The Bad Batch
Sing
Bad Santa 2
Storks
Assassin's Creed
 
a list of 14 people
Who are the Most Valuable Players in the movies?

What actors generate the most American domestic gross (dogro)?

There are a lot of ways to measure this, and The Measured Circle has our own (begun with movies released in 2010).

Here are our rules:

1. You must have been first-billed in a movie that makes at least $100 million dogro in the year in question

2. You must have appeared in at least one other movie that dogroed at least $40 million in the year in question (but you do not have to have been first-billed)

3. Voice roles count: one of the reasons they cast big names in animated features is that they attract audiences

4. Since we base it on release year, it may be well into the following year until the standings are final. We do not count re-releases that do not happen in the same year as the initial release.

Movies in which the actor appeared and earned at least $40 million in the year in question may appear in the description for the actor.

Added in 2016 (starting with our 2015 MVPs): the "On a roll" designation. It's perhaps surprisingly difficult for an actor to repeat on our list two years in a row...and even harder to do it for three or more. We will now recognize that achievement in The Measured Circle's MVP list.

===

Projected (we expect that at least one of the movies listed for the actor will break $100m domestically, and that the other will make at least $40m domestically):

•Karan Soni: Deadpool; B-Roll; Ghostbusters; The Sweet Life; Mono; Little B*tches
•Ben Affleck: Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice; Suicide Squad; The Accountant
•Jesse Eisenberg: Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice; Cafe Society; Now You See Me 2
•Callan Mulvey: Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice; Beyond Skyline; Warcraft; Delirium
•Bill Murray: The Jungle Book; Ghostbusters; Untitled Wes Anderson project


Possible (in these cases, we are not as confident that either of the movies will get to $100m, and that the other one will get to $40m):



Why isn't...on the list?
 
a list of 51 people
Who are the Most Valuable Players in the movies? What actors generate the most American domestic gross (dogro)?

There are a lot of ways to measure this, and The Measured Circle has our own (begun with movies released in 2010).

Here are our rules:

1. You must have been first-billed in a movie that makes at least $100 million dogro in the year in question

2. You must have appeared in at least one other movie that dogroed at least $40 million in the year in question (but you do not have to have been first-billed)

3. Voice roles count: one of the reasons they cast big names in animated features is that they attract audiences

4. Since we base it on release year, it may be well into the following year until the standings are final. We do not count re-releases that do not happen in the same year as the initial release. Movies in which the actor appeared and earned at least $40 million in the year in question may appear in the description for the actor.

Added in 2016 (starting with our 2015 MVPs): the "On a roll" designation. It's perhaps surprisingly difficult for an actor to repeat on our list two years in a row...and even harder to do it for three or more. We will now recognize that achievement in The Measured Circle's MVP list.
===

Projected (we expect that at least one of the movies listed for the actor will break $100m domestically, and that the other will make at least $40m domestically):

Possible (in these cases, we are not as confident that either of the movies will get to $100m, and that the other one will get to $40m):


Why isn't...on the list?
 
a list of 70 titles
While tracking a movie's box office is fascinating, The Measured Circle is also interested in how profitable a movie is.

This list of movies making a domestic gross ("dogro") of at least $40 million in the USA in 2015 ranks them in order, based on their dogro against their rumored production budgets. Certainly there are other costs (including the not inconsiderable marketing budget) and other income (including foreign box office and merchandising), but this can give us an interesting picture.

Expect studios to look at these types of results, and sometimes greenlight projects based on them (although it's hard to resist spending a $100 million on a possible blockbuster).

Note that recent releases will typically appear lower on this list than their eventual results. If they were in the top ten the weekend before the list is updated, they will normally be marked with "and counting".

Movies where the rumored production budget is not available on IMDb (or elsewhere...we prefer using BoxOfficeMojo, which, like IMDb, is owned by Amazon, but which have dogroed at least $40m in 2015 in the USA appear at the bottom of the list. They may be more profitable than many of the movies above them, but we can't do the math on them.

As a new feature (introduced in 2013), we've decided to label movies, to make this clearer. A traditional measure of success if the dogro being twice the production budget. Using that as a starting point...

Dogro 2X production budget = "Money"
Dogro 3X production budget = "Golden" Dogro
30X production budget = "Platinum" (God's Not Dead prompted the creation of this new award)

Dogro less than 50% of production budget = "Underperformer"


Sub-40s

These movies did not make it to the list below because they did not dogro $40.0m. We will note two kinds: ones that have dogroed triple their production budget (Golden) or had a production budget of at $40.0m and have not dogroed half of their budget (Underachievers). Golden Sub-40s may appear here before their run is done and they may earn more dogro (particularly if they are nominated for or win Oscars). Underachiever Sub-40s are not added here until that status seems very likely (we will typically wait at least two months from the release date).

Golden Sub-40s

The Boy Next Door: $35.4m (reported budget: $4.0m) 885% (Double Golden)
The DUFF: $35.0m (reported budget: $8.5m) 412% (Golden)
Woman in Gold: $33.3m (reported budget: $11.0m) 303% (Golden)
The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel: $33.1m (reported budget: $10.0m) 331% (Golden)
Unfriended: $32.5m (reported budget: $1.0m) 3250% (Platinum)
The Lazarus Effect: $25.8m (reported budget: $3.3m) 781% (Double Golden)
The Gallows: $22.5m (reported budget: $100k) 2250%
Dope: $16.7m (reported budget: $0.7m) 2386% Septuple Golden
Grandma: $6.8m (reported budget: $0.6m) 1183% Triple Golden

Underachiever Sub-40s (prodbud at least $40.0m)

Seventh Son: $17.2m (reported budget: $95.0m)
Blackhat: $7.9m (reported budget: $70.0m)
Mortdecai: $7.7m (reported budget: $60.0m)
The Last Witch Hunter $27.1m (reported budget: $90.0m)
Pan $34.8m (reported budget: $150.0m)
In the Heart of the Sea: $25.0m (reported budget: $100.0m)
Point Break: $28.7m (reported budget: $105m)

Probable Underachievers


Projected (we are confident these movies will appear on the list):
 
a list of 1,036 people
Who hasn't appeared in a role in the Batman universe? It seems like not very many people, as we list actors who have appeared in Batman movies, TV shows, video games, and more.

Note that this is a work in progress.

The order will be roughly:

* Actors who have played Batman
* Actors who have played other characters which have been played by more than one actor (Robin, Alfred, Commissioner Gordon, the Bat-villains, and so on)
* Cameos (celebrities who have appeared as themselves)
* Actors who have played more than one character in the Batman universe (say, two different henchmen in the 1966-68 TV series)
* Actors who have played one non-recurring character in the Batman universe

"The Scooby Doo Conundrum": a note on inclusions

Deciding what productions count as being in the Batman universe is complicated. Batman has appeared on Scooby Doo, and clearly, the actor who played Batman in that situation should be listed. Should Scooby Doo count? I'd say yes, just as characters Batman encounters in the 1966-68 TV series count. However, what about every other Scooby Doo episode which doesn't feature Batman? After all, Batman apparently exists in Scooby Doo's world. I'm going to say no...all characters in an episode that features Batman, yes, but not characters from episodes that don't (unless the series has Batman or a character directly connected to Batman as a regular). For example, I will count Gotham Girls (which has Catwoman and Batgirl as series regulars). I count episodes of Justice League that feature Batman (and all the characters in them), but not ones that don't.

On credits:

Star Trek refers to the original series. "Star Trek universe" refers to all of the TV series and movies that are Star Trek. For example, someone who appeared on Star Trek: The Next Generation will be listed as having appeared in the Star Trek universe. You may also see that "universe" designation for other franchises.

One other thing: some people who do voiceover work may have credits as several characters. That means it isn't really possible to group, say, everybody who played The Riddler together in this list...if one of those people also played The Penguin.
 
a list of 92 people
Who are the Most Valuable Players in the movies? What actors generate the most American domestic gross (dogro)? There are a lot of ways to measure this, and The Measured Circle has our own (begun with movies released in 2010).

Here are our rules:

1. You must have been first-billed in a movie that makes at least $100 million dogro in the year in question

2. You must have appeared in at least one other movie that dogroed at least $40 million in the year in question (but you do not have to have been first-billed)

3. Voice roles count: one of the reasons they cast big names in animated features is that they attract audiences

4. Since we base it on release year, it may be well into the following year until the standings are final.

We do not count re-releases that do not happen in the same year as the initial release. Movies in which the actor appeared and earned at least $40 million in the year in question may appear in the description for the actor.

===

Projected (we expect that at least one of the movies listed for the actor will break $100m domestically, and that the other will make at least $40m domestically):


Possible (in these cases, we are not as confident that either of the movies will get to $100m, and that the other one will get to $40m):


Why isn't...on the list?

Shaquille O'Neal: while he did appear in The Lego Movie and Blended, he was not first billed in the former. Shaq did appear on the list in 2013
 
a list of 79 titles
While tracking a movie's box office is fascinating, The Measured Circle is also interested in how profitable a movie is.

This list of movies making a domestic gross ("dogro") of at least $40 million in the USA in 2014 ranks them in order, based on their dogro against their rumored production budgets. Certainly there are other costs (including the not inconsiderable marketing budget) and other income (including foreign box office and merchandising), but this can give us an interesting picture.

Expect studios to look at these types of results, and sometimes greenlight projects based on them (although it's hard to resist spending a $100 million on a possible blockbuster).

Note that recent releases will typically appear lower on this list than their eventual results. If they were in the top ten the weekend before the list is updated, they will normally be marked with "and counting".

Movies where the rumored production budget is not available on IMDb, but which have dogroed at least $40m in 2014 in the USA appear at the bottom of the list. They may be more profitable than many of the movies above them, but we can't do the math on them.

As a new feature (introduced in 2013), we've decided to label movies, to make this clearer.

A traditional measure of success if the dogro being twice the production budget. Using that as a starting point...

Dogro 2X production budget = "Money"
Dogro 3X production budget = "Golden"
Dogro 30X production budget = "Platinum" (God's Not Dead prompted the creation of this new award)

Dogro less than 50% of production budget = "Underperformer"

Sub-40s

These movies did not make it to the list below because they did not dogro $40.0m. We will note two kinds: ones that have dogroed triple their production budget (Golden) or had a production budget of at $40.0m and have not dogroed half of their budget (Underachievers). Golden Sub-40s may appear here before their run is done and they may earn more dogro (particularly if they are nominated for or win Oscars). Underachiever Sub-40s are not added here until that status seems very likely (we will typically wait at least two months from the release date).

Golden Sub-40s:

Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones: $32.5m (reported budget: $5.0m) 650% Double Golden
Oculus $27.7m (reported budget: $5.0m) 554% Golden
A Haunted House 2 $17.3m (reported budget: $4.0m) 433% Golden
Nightcrawler $31.5m (reported budget: $8.5m) 371% Golden
That Awkward Moment $26.1m (reported budget: $8.0m) 326% Golden
Boyhood $24.1m (reported budget: $4.0m) 603% Double Golden

Underachiever Sub-40s (budget at least $40.0m):

The Legend of Hercules: $18.8m= (reported budget: $70.0m) 27%
I, Frankenstein: $19.1m (reported budget: $65.0m) 29%
Transcendence: $23.0m (reported budget: $100.0m) 23%
Pompeii $23.2m (reported budget: $100.0m) 23%
Winter's Tale $12.6m (reported budget: $60.0m) 21%
Legends of Oz: Dorothy's Return $8.5m (reported budget: $70.0m) 12%
 
a list of 103 people
Who are the Most Valuable Players in the movies? What actors generate the most American domestic gross (dogro)? There are a lot of ways to measure this, and The Measured Circle has our own (begun with movies released in 2010).

Here are our rules:

1. You must have been first-billed in a movie that makes at least $100 million dogro in the year in question

2. You must have appeared in at least one other movie that dogroed at least $40 million in the year in question (but you do not have to have been first-billed)

3. Voice roles count: one of the reasons they cast big names in animated features is that they attract audiences

4. Note that these are all of the qualifiers, not in order of the most box office.

5. Since we base it on release year, it may be well into the following year until the standings are final. We do not count re-releases that do not happen in the same year as the initial release. Movies in which the actor appeared and earned at least $40 million in the year in question may appear in the description for the actor.
 
a list of 76 titles
While tracking a movie's box office is fascinating, The Measured Circle is also interested in how profitable a movie is.

This list of movies making a domestic gross ("dogro") of at least $40 million in the USA in 2013 ranks them in order, based on their dogro against their rumored production budgets. Certainly there are other costs (including the not inconsiderable marketing budget) and other income (including foreign box office and merchandising), but this can give us an interesting picture.

Expect studios to look at these types of results, and sometimes greenlight projects based on them (although it's hard to resist spending a $100 million on a possible blockbuster).

Note that recent releases will typically appear lower on this list than their eventual results. If they were in the top ten the weekend before the list is updated, they will normally be marked with "and counting".

Movies where the rumored production budget is not available on IMDb, but which have dogroed at least $40m in 2013 in the USA appear at the bottom of the list. They may be more profitable than many of the movies above them, but we can't do the math on them.

As a new feature, we've decided to label movies, to make this clearer.

A traditional measure of success if the dogro being twice the production budget. Using that as a starting point...

Dogro 2X production budget = "Money"
Dogro 3X production budget = "Golden"

Dogro less than 50% of production budget = "Underperformer"
 
a list of 73 people
Who are the Most Valuable Players in the movies? What actors generate the most American domestic gross (dogro)? There are a lot of ways to measure this, and The Measured Circle has our own (begun with movies released in 2010).

Here are our rules:

1. You must have been first-billed in a movie that makes at least $100 million dogro in the year in question

2. You must have appeared in at least one other movie that dogroed at least $40 million in the year in question (but you do not have to have been first-billed)

3. Voice roles count: one of the reasons they cast big names in animated features is that they attract audiences

4. Note that these are all of the qualifiers, not in order of the most box office.

5. Since we base it on release year, it may be well into the following year until the standings are final. We do not count re-releases that do not happen in the same year as the initial release. Movies in which the actor appeared and earned at least $40 million in the year in question may appear in the description for the actor.

The list is now tentatively ranked, although it may change as late release 2012 titles continue to add dogro.
 
a list of 69 people
Who are the Most Valuable Players in the movies?

What actors generate the most American domestic gross (dogro)?

There are a lot of ways to measure this, and The Measured Circle has our own (begun with movies released in 2010). Here are our rules:

1. You must have been first-billed in a movie that makes at least $100 million dogro in the year in question

2. You must have appeared in at least one other movie that dogroed at least $40 million in the year in question (but you do not have to have been first-billed)

3. Voice roles count: one of the reasons they cast big names in animated features is that they attract audiences

4. Note that these are all of the qualifiers, not in order of the most box office.

5. Since we base it on release year, it may be well into the following year until the standings are final. We do not count re-releases that do not happen in the same year as the initial release.

Movies in which the actor appeared and earned at least $40 million in the year in question appear in the description for the actor.

Update: The list has now been put in order. Congratulations to Ken Jeong for being The Measured Circle's Box Office Most Valuable Player for 2011!
 
a list of 3 titles
There are plenty of reasons to hate Hollywood remakes (Matthew Broderick’s Godzilla, Nicolas Cage’s The Wicker Man).

Put “Worst Movie Remakes” into a search engine and you’ll get pages of websites devoted to the topic. You’ll see all sorts of derogatory comments:

“Of the many crimes foisted upon humanity by the faceless filmmaking syndicate known as Hollywood, perhaps none are as loathsome as the subpar remake.”
–Movieline

“Our cinemas seem to be blighted with remakes these days …”
-suite101.com

“…please stop ruining the great horror movies of the past.”
-FilmSchoolRejects

So, why would Hollywood keeping making remakes?

Well, a really common answer to “Why?” is “the money, honey”. That Godzilla movie? $55 million opening weekend in the US, eventual US gross of $136 million. That was on a budget (according to the IMDB page) of $130 million. That’s just the US gross…it made money overseas, money on home video, and so on.

The Wicker Man remake, though? Maybe not so much…$40 million budget, US gross of $23 million.

The fact is that audiences like familiarity. It’s sort of like going to your high school reunion…you want to see those people again, even though you might have hated them (or not even remember some of them). Producers like it, too. Nobody knows why a particular movie makes money, really. It’s always a risk. You want to pitch a movie in Hollywood? You’d better be able to say “It’s like [insert blockbuster here] meets [insert second blockbuster here]“.

Oh, truly original movies get made…but they may be financed by the director’s family. Sometimes a studio will back an unprecedented plot…but there is usually some other reason for it. Maybe the script has a lot of buzz, or you’re willing to let the moviemaker have a vanity project every once in awhile, as long as they churn out the bread-and-butter predictables on a regular basis.

So, audiences always hate remakes, right?

Nope.

I always look for the other side, I want to turn the popular notions over and see what’s hiding underneath.

Some of the most beloved movies of all time are, themselves, remakes. They may make such an impression that people don’t even realize they are remakes…they think they are the originals.

Critics may love them, high-schoolers quote them, Oscar give them the gold…and yes, they may make money, too.

The next time you hear about the latest Hollywood remake, I want you to think about the following examples of that much maligned group. Who knows? Put away the prejudice and you may be saying…

“Hooray for remakes!”