Reviews written by registered user
ollie501

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20 reviews in total 
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The Core (2003)
5 out of 10 people found the following review useful:
Suspend belief and enjoy it for what it is!, 1 November 2005
7/10

Yes, scientifically it's absolute garbage; it has more plot holes than half a tonne of Swiss cheese, and above all IT'S FUN! It annoys the hell out of me when reviewers "analyse" films like this, picking holes in every minute detail. Of course it's a load of old toffee, whereas Star Wars, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Monsters Inc, The Terminator are all perfectly plausible, 100% accurate depictions of reality. If you want real life, look out the window. Sure this film isn't in the same league as the aforementioned, but it doesn't make any pretensions about being something it isn't. Its two hours of brainless entertainment. If I want heavy duty, I'll watch Truffaut, Bunel, or some hard hitting drama. If I want to relax, kick back, and forget about a crappy day, this is exactly the sort of film to do that.

Who says all films have to accurate? A group of reviewers with their heads so stuck in trying to scientifically unravel the film, while trying to pull their heads out of their own orifices (or is that orifi?).

This film is great action, suitably silly, visually and sonically decent, and an excellent load of fun to watch with a load of mates, a decent pizza and a few beers. Sure I like serious drama; I like films that move me to tears, films that make me laugh, and sometimes films that just entertain the hell out of me. This one definitely falls into that category!

Planta 4ª (2003)
26 out of 28 people found the following review useful:
A genuine masterpiece!, 5 December 2004
10/10

Planta 4a

A Review by Ollie.

Planta 4a is a truly remarkable film. A coming of age drama, dealing with first love, basketball, the usual childhood mischief, and above all, friendship. Basically a comedy, this will definitely bring laughter, and maybe a few tears along the way… I can't recall seeing a coming of age drama with such a refreshing honesty suffused with sadness and humour since 'Stand By Me'. Oh, and by the way… it just happens to be set in the cancer ward of a hospital.

One could be forgiven at this point for thinking that this sets the scene as thoroughly depressing. It is anything but! The young lads suffer from cancer, and while that is never forgotten, nor overlooked, it never dominates the film, choosing to remain almost in the background. Director Antonio Mercero has managed to take a difficult subject, and bring true unflinching humour into the story, whilst never making light of the gravity of the illness the boys suffer from.

Made all the more remarkable by the fact that it is based on a true story, that of Albert Espinosa, a long time sufferer, and survivor of cancer, it is little surprise to note that the film has already won numerous awards, and much critical acclaim. Lead actor Juan José Ballesta, himself a Goya award winner for his astonishing performance in 'El Bola' turns in a stunning performance, although the same is true of the rest of the young, and mostly hitherto unheard of, cast.

Originally a theatrical piece, 'Los Pelones', or 'The Baldies', this adapts very well to the big and indeed small screen. 'The Baldies' is the name affectionately given to the young patients, by the hospital staff, for obvious reasons, and drawing from his own experiences, Espinosa conveys beautifully, the emotions and trials of growing up with cancer, and indeed just plain growing up. The film treats the individuals as exactly that; a group of young lads, finding their way in the world, their places in the social pecking order, and dealing with all the normal things teenage boys deal with. Never once are they treated as 'victims', and rightly so. They are ordinary teenagers, from different backgrounds, dealing with different emotions and problems, whilst all sharing one common factor, which never once overtakes the coming of age theme the film so eloquently portrays.

It is directed with such simplicity and refreshing honesty, that Mercero has created a true masterpiece. Given the choice of subject matter, and the fact that this is, in essence, a comedy, a film like this is a very delicate balancing act. It would be all too easy for the balance of the film to sway at any point, and yet it never does. It walks a fine line between drama and comedy, never once faltering, and it is to be respected for that.

Planta 4a contains several scenes which maybe unsuitable for younger viewers, however they are all in keeping with the overall tone of the film. There is nothing gratuitous or unnecessary; the strong language is appropriate given the age of the boys – teenage boys swear; it's just another part of the rich tapestry of their lives.

This film is an absolute joy to watch – it will make you cry with laughter, and in places, will probably just make you cry. There is sadness, naturally. It would be unrealistic if there was none, and yet again, it never overwhelms the film.

If you get the opportunity to see this, either at the cinema, or on DVD (which takes some finding, but it does exist), please, please do yourself a favour, and see it. Savour it – films like this are rare, but like any precious gem, finding them gives remarkable rewards. There are few films with cancer infused into the storyline, and even fewer that leave you with a warm and fuzzy feel-good factor. This film is one of those rare exceptions, which dares to take on a tough subject, and use it almost as a secondary theme.

I dislike 'scoring' peoples work, but in this rare instance I am happy to make an exception – this garners a very well earned 10 out of 10!

Reviewed by Ollie 6th December 2004.

Manic (2001)
3 out of 4 people found the following review useful:
Powerful and deeply affecting, 25 January 2004
10/10

Manic - 2002 Dir Jordan Melamed

A Review by Ollie

Lyle Jensen, played with astonishing accuracy by Joseph Gordon-Levitt is subject to sudden and violent outbursts, and he is committed to the juvenile wing of the Northwood Mental Institution, where a dramatic and very powerful insight into juvenile mental illness is played out by an equally adept cast. To single Joseph out would be unfair, as the entire cast turns in a remarkable performance. Cody Lightning's quiet, gentle and deeply affecting performance of an abused child is disconcerting – actor's aren't supposed to be this realistic… are they?

Trying to help these desperate young people is Dr Monroe, portrayed by Don Cheadle, who clearly has problems of his own. The scenes of group therapy are powerful and emotionally draining, most notably when Monroe `loses it' with Lyle.

I am not going to even attempt to review the film with too much depth. This is one where only the individual reviewer can do that. There are plenty of reviews on the IMDB, 99% of which all seem to voice more or less the same opinion, which I share, that this is a compelling, and frighteningly realistic portrayal of the depths of human instinct and mental torture.

The final scene is beautiful and you are left wondering whether Lyle is walking away, or walking back – more than that I will not say.

I have worked with people who have had various mental disorders, and the portrayal of each individual character is startlingly accurate, and almost poetic. Levitt portrays more with his eyes than most actors manage to convey through an entire film. From sadness, desperation and an emptiness that no fully sane person could hope to comprehend, to intense anger and rage, it's all there, deep in those eyes. Words become an added luxury to his conveyance of such a deeply disturbed young man.

Weakest link? I don't know – the colour of the walls? Put simply, there are no weak links. The direction is intense, the camerawork belies that of a fly-on-the-wall documentary, the score is subtle and effective, the casting could not have been better.

This isn't going to be to everyone's taste – it is deeply, deeply affecting, and succeeded in reducing me to tears at more than one point. The shaky, camcorder style direction is bound to put some off, but this isn't a big bucks, Hollywood blockbuster – this is a film for people who love and appreciate true film, and moreover, true life. This is as real as it gets, and is well worth seeing.

It gets a full 10/10 from me, for many reasons, not least that I have seen first hand the ravaging affect mental instability can have a person, and I have yet to see a more accurate portrayal. Simply astonishing.

Reviewed by Ollie Jan 2004.

14 out of 16 people found the following review useful:
Pure cinema poetry, 16 January 2004
10/10

Detstvo Gorkogo (The Childhood of Maxim Gorky) - 1938 Directed by Mark Donskoy G. Shenotinnik

A Review By Ollie

The Childhood of Maxim Gorky, tells the story of Aleksei Peshkov a 12 year old boy, living in 19th Century Russia, who would later be known as Maxim Gorky, possibly Russia's most famous and celebrated novelist and dramatist. Made in 1938, the film is based on Gorky's autobiography `My Childhood', and is rich and powerful film which will capture your attention from the beginning.

Naturally, being made in 1938, the film is in black and white, although the story is so colourful and vibrant, with characters so alive, you would be forgiven for thinking the film was made much later. It definitely does not feel almost 65 years old.

Aleksei Lyarsky, who plays Gorky, is instantly likeable as the young protagonist. Capable of portraying emotions far beyond his years, he works superbly alongside a cast of commanding and believable proportion. There is an almost Dickensian feel to some of the characters. While desperately sad, and easy to sympathise with, the Grandfather has an ineffable quality, both humorous and self pitying. In stark contrast, Maxim's Grandmother is a simple woman, one of goodness and truth, representing all that is beautiful in the optimism of the poverty in which they live.

This film is more than an autobiographical look at one person's life. It is a peek through the windows of a time long since passed, a history lesson and above all a lesson in life, love and friendship. This is probably the most definitive coming of age drama I have seen, with more authority and gravitas than Truffaut managed in the much acclaimed `400 Blows'.

There are several scenes which stand out. From a simple act of kindness from Maxim, when he gives a crippled boy his pet mouse, to Gorky and his friends sitting around a fire dreaming of a Utopian Neverland; from his Grandfathers almost comedic reactions to their ever increasing poverty, to the tears of his Grandmother as he hands her a coin.

This is a rich and immensely strong film, advanced well beyond it's years, which holds it's own exceptionally well nearly 65 years later. This film will leave an indelible mark on your memory, if only from the simplicity of the tale it tells. It is, without doubt, pure cinematic poetry. A piece of film history which everyone would do well to try and see –it will not disappoint. An extremely well earned 10/10!

Ollie

16 out of 18 people found the following review useful:
Severely underrated - a classic!, 15 January 2004
10/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

MINOR SPOILERS WITHIN!

Where the Red Fern Grows – Dir Norman Tokar -1974 Reviewed by Ollie

This is simple, well intentioned and instantly likeable film. Made in 1974, there are evident signs of the age of the film, but this works to its advantage. This is one of the classics. Perhaps not as famous as Old Yeller, it's `older brother', which also hailed from the Disney studio's, it is equally as likeable. Stewart Petersen does a terrific job as young Billy Coleman, and makes the character immensely likeable.

The film follows Billy's life, as he desperately saves money to buy a pair of hunting dogs. It is evident that he leads a fairly poor, but honest life, and struggles with his decision to buy the dogs, as opposed to giving the money to his Father. On going to collect the dogs, he is stared at by the local folk, almost looked down upon, each one in turn glancing at this scruffy, barefoot young character as he enters `their world'. Picked on by local children, he befriends the local sheriff, who we meet again later in the film.

There are some wonderful scenes, from his first encounter with his new found friends, as they lick his toes, and he gently picks them up for the first time, to the comical scene where he is training them, and they run, followed by three children, through the house, sliding every which way on their Mothers freshly cleaned kitchen floor, in a scene which borders farcical, but knows where to draw the line, in keeping the humour gentle.

Billy is an idealistic young man, willing to take a beating and defy his mother, rather than break a promise to his dogs. All this makes him a very likeable, and identifiable character. This is further showed toward the end of the film, when his true courage and sportsmanship show themselves in a hunting competition.

This is by no means a jolly film – it's a positive tearjerker, unashamedly so. There is a death, which in itself is only mildly instrumental to the plot, but serves Billy a valuable life lesson, and the viewer is left feeling his pain and sorrow.

The end is equally sad, which I won't give away, but there is a beautiful closing shot as the camera pans away from the family, focusing on a single red fern….

There are times when deep, clever plots, and intense dialogue serve no purpose, and this film is a shining example of this. It has no pretences about what it is. It is a lesson that true beauty is found in the simplicity and innocence of a child's world.

It is quite simply, a nice film. I am not fond of the word `nice', but in this instance it serves well to describe the film. A great example that some of the older films, can still give modern Hollywood movies a run for their money. This does just that, and wins hands down all the way.

Particular mention must also be made to the soundtrack, which is perfect for the film, and simply beautiful, from the gentle incidental music, to the lyrics in every song. I watched this anticipating it to be a little `ropey', and perhaps rough around the edges, given it is 30 years old. That anticipation was the only thing the film wasn't. It really is a polished gem of a movie, and one that I can recommend very highly. Sure it's a sappy, sentimental tearjerker – it doesn't pretend to be anything else, and for that, I loved it. A very well earned 10/10!

Ollie

9 out of 9 people found the following review useful:
Pure cinematic poetry, 10 January 2004
10/10

Detstvo Gorkogo (The Childhood of Maxim Gorky) - 1938 Directed by Mark Donskoy G. Shenotinnik

A Review By Ollie

The Childhood of Maxim Gorky, tells the story of Aleksei Peshkov a 12 year old boy, living in 19th Century Russia, who would later be known as Maxim Gorky, possibly Russia's most famous and celebrated novelist and dramatist. Made in 1938, the film is based on Gorky's autobiography `My Childhood', and is rich and powerful film which will capture your attention from the beginning.

Naturally, being made in 1938, the film is in black and white, although the story is so colourful and vibrant, with characters so alive, you would be forgiven for thinking the film was made much later. It definitely does not feel almost 65 years old.

Aleksei Lyarsky, who plays Gorky, is instantly likeable as the young protagonist. Capable of portraying emotions far beyond his years, he works superbly alongside a cast of commanding and believable proportion. There is an almost Dickensian feel to some of the characters. While desperately sad, and easy to sympathise with, the Grandfather has an ineffable quality, both humorous and self pitying. In stark contrast, Maxim's Grandmother is a simple woman, one of goodness and truth, representing all that is beautiful in the optimism of the poverty in which they live.

This film is more than an autobiographical look at one person's life. It is a peek through the windows of a time long since passed, a history lesson and above all a lesson in life, love and friendship. This is probably the most definitive coming of age drama I have seen, with more authority and gravitas than Truffaut managed in the much acclaimed `400 Blows'.

There are several scenes which stand out. From a simple act of kindness from Maxim, when he gives a crippled boy his pet mouse, to Gorky and his friends sitting around a fire dreaming of a Utopian Neverland; from his Grandfathers almost comedic reactions to their ever increasing poverty, to the tears of his Grandmother as he hands her a coin.

This is a rich and immensely strong film, advanced well beyond it's years, which holds it's own exceptionally well nearly 65 years later. This film will leave an indelible mark on your memory, if only from the simplicity of the tale it tells. It is, without doubt, pure cinematic poetry. A piece of film history which everyone would do well to try and see -it will not disappoint. An extremely well earned 10/10!

Ollie

Pure (2002/I)
4 out of 8 people found the following review useful:
A reasonable effort - perhaps too likeable, 3 January 2004
7/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

PURE - 2002 (Dir Gillies MacKinnon)

Reviewed By Ollie - Jan 2004

CONTAINS SPOILERS

Those who have seen the remarkable of performance of Harry Eden in `Real Men' will doubtless be familiar with his capable handling of powerful roles. `Pure' is British drama, set around a London based single mother and her two sons, Lee and Paul (as played by Eden). A promising start to the film shows young Paul preparing drugs for his heroin addicted mother, and handing her the syringe. A desolate look appears on his face as his mother confesses to having forgotten his birthday.

Billed as a gritty and powerful drama, this movie is good, but hardly outstanding. Eden's performance is superb, given the material he has to work with. For the best part of the film young Paul looks for all the world as though he is hardened to the situation in which he lives. There is a empty, tired and vacant gaze behind his eyes, reflecting the impact of living with a drug addicted parent.

The film is not without gentle touches of humour. The scene in which Mel (played adeptly by Molly Parker) hands over the child, Rose, to the doctor on the bus, is both sad, and gently amusing, as Paul glances back to the doctor warning him `don't give her pepperoni - it gives her the shits'.

From here the film delves into the world of heroin abuse, with detox scenes and the inevitable problems that arise from them. Unfortunately this is where the film is ultimately badly let down.

The film is good, but that's as far as it goes. It could have been so much better, and barely warrants its 18 certification. Harry Eden is an outstanding actor, and this film could have been such an opportunity to explore his vast potential. Sadly though, this role is a little like giving Michael Schumacher a Mini - you just know that Harry could have done so much with the part, given the chance. He is denied the opportunity to portray any real emotion - it is only in the last 15 minutes in which we see this world weary ten year old cry. Whether this is intentional is difficult to say, as the direction of the film doesn't have quite the impact to allow any true sense of desperation.

The detoxification is reasonably well handled, but is not shown with the impact that it would genuinely have. Overall, the main problem is that the film is too likeable, and nowhere near uncompromising enough given the subject matter. Paul's introduction to heroin, to `feel what his mother feels', seems to have been put in for shock value, and is unconvincing and unrealistic, and using it as his mothers inspiration for kicking her habit is clichéd, nearly as much as the family suggesting `pie and eels' for a celebration meal is a jaded and stereotyped image of `the real cockney'.

For all its faults though, `Pure' is a decent enough film, with characters you can warm to, and is generally a very likeable film. Sadly it is this likeability that detracts from the seriousness of the subject matter, and one cannot help but feel that Harry Eden is not given enough room to allow his character to develop. This means that the viewers are robbed of the opportunity to see this young actors remarkable talent at its full potential. A well earned 7.5/10 for this well meaning, but sugar coated movie, which could have been so much more...

Ollie

Léolo (1992)
6 out of 12 people found the following review useful:
Unique and lyrical exploration of a childs fantasy, 27 December 2003
8/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Léolo (1992) - Dir- Jean-Claude Lauzon Reviewed by Ollie - 27th December 2003.

CONTAINS SPOILERS

This is probably one of the most difficult reviews I have written, simply because I have absolutely no idea where to begin. Léolo is one of the most unique, and unusual films I have ever seen. Unlike most films it doesn't sit comfortably in any particular genre. It dances a fine line between black comedy, and an offbeat coming of age `drama'.

Leon Lauzon, or `Léolo' is convinced that he is the unlikely offspring of a sperm laden Sicilian tomato, and that his true heritage is that of Italian blood. For the most part, his family are insane. His Father is obsessed with bowel motion, on the theory that, and I quote, `A s*** a day, keeps the Doctor away'. His brother, after a fight with a bully becomes obsessed with body building, one sister is obese, borderline catatonic and appears to happily communicate with insects, the other is in a mental institution, where most of the family seem to reside with startling regularity.

This film will not appeal to everyone. There are some particularly unpleasant scenes, including an attempted murder, the `rape' of a cat, by a group of beer swilling, glue sniffing, leather clad youths, and Léolo himself having a sexual experience with what appears to be a piece of liver.

Throughout the film, these images are neatly juxtaposed with a poetic, and in places, almost lyrical dialogue.

There is a lot to take on board in one viewing. This is a film that most definitely demands attention, and concentration. Light hearted entertainment it most certainly isn't, but it is ultimately rewarding, albeit as a sad reflection of a young boy's progression into sexual awareness, and eventual descent into the madness that, through his writing, he is continually trying to escape.

This film walks a fine line between a sick and depraved collection of perverse imagery, and a poetic, gentle and yet devastating account of life. Somehow, through a combination of superb acting, unique direction and a fabulous soundtrack, the film manages to always stay on its metaphorical tightrope.

Definitely well worth seeing, although to fully appreciate the film, I suspect two or three viewings will be necessary. If I had to award points to the film it would get a well deserved 8.5/10.

Ollie

21 out of 22 people found the following review useful:
Truffaut's most touching film, 18 December 2003
9/10

L'Enfant sauvage, Dir François Truffaut – 1969

Reviewed by Ollie – December 19th 2003

Three hunters discover and a naked child, living in a forest. Capturing him, he is taken to an institute for deaf and mute children. From there he is used as little more than an exhibit.

Having read of his story, Jean Itard, a Parisian doctor, played by Truffaut himself, makes it his goal to integrate this `wild child' into society. What follows is an astonishing tale of a boy, completely deprived of all human contact, as he adapt to life in an unfamiliar, structured society. Named simply `Victor' by Dr Itard, we watch as kindly doctor attempts to educate and communicate with this unusual child. We see Victor's first smiles; we hear his first intelligible sounds, and witness, for the first time, his tears.

This is a deeply powerful film, directed brilliantly by Truffaut, and far surpassing his earlier, and much more critically acclaimed `400 Blows'. Jean-Pierre Cargol plays Victor with a remarkable passion, and is absolutely convincing as this child of the forest. His mannerisms, his posture, his very presence would have one believing he genuinely was a `wild child'.

Truffaut follows this story with startling accuracy – based on the real life journals of Dr Itard, his adaptation is faithful to the last. His portrayal of the Doctor is filled with compassion, and a tenderness rarely seen in films.

This is genuine pleasure to watch, and is a testament to enduring spirit of mankind. The main criticism I have is the abrupt ending. We are left with so many unanswered questions. In truth, the real `Victor' died approximately 28 years after his first encounter with Itard. I know little of what happened during the time span between the end of the film and his death, but I intend to find out. This film is only a glance at a boy being introduced to a strange, frightening and unfamiliar world.

It is not without its moments of humour. The scene where Victor practically throws the doctor tending to Itard from the house is both funny and charming, while remaining delicately underplayed.

Everything about this film works so well, from the minimalist photography to the classical score. The casting could not have been better. Truffaut presents himself as not only an accomplished director, but also as an inspired actor. Jean-Pierre Cargol is utterly believable, and thoroughly likeable as Victor, and mention must go to Françoise Seigner, as Madame Geurin, Itard's housekeeper, and the child's carer.

This is a very special film, which deserves a great deal of respect. The visual transfer to DVD is accurate and crisp, and the mono soundtrack subtle, clear and effective. This is one DVD which would have greatly benefited from some extras. Perhaps some insight into Victors' life from adolescence to his death, and some information on what became of Itard. Lack of extras notwithstanding, this should still be very high on anyone's shopping list, and is highly recommended. I believe this was Truffauts' crowning achievement, and is a truly beautiful and inspiring film.

Reviewed by Ollie

Killer Kid (1994)
5 out of 6 people found the following review useful:
A sad and brutal insight into the world of the child militia, 17 December 2003
10/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***



CONTAINS SPOILERS

Looking at the title of film, and reading the back of dvd box, one could easily be forgiven for thinking this is a second rate film, with an implausible plot of a kid sent to assassinate the President of France. It has the sound of a film which would be the antithesis of Agent Cody Banks.

Titles and introductions are where the world of Hollywood and this film dramatically part company. This is an eyeopening film, offering a valuable, if unsettling, insight into the world of the child soldiers. Set in Lebanon, it begins with the indoctrination of Djilali, capably played by Teufik Jallab, into the world of the militia.

This is a world where children are taught to fight, and die, for the beliefs imposed on them. Their training is brutal and unforgiving, and this is reflected with an accuracy that chills to the bone.

Dijilali is chosen to undertake a mission. To stay with, and learn about a young boy, Karim, as whom he will pose. His ultimate goal, the assassination of the French Premier.

Karim (Younesse Boudache), again played with considerable passion, is an Arabian child living in poverty in Paris. He knows nothing of terrorism, child soldiers and the horror that awaits him. His world consists of petty crime, skateboarding and rap music. These children's lives could not be more diametrically opposed. Dijilali's mission is simple. Learn about this boy, become the boy and carry out his sacred duty. However an unlikely friendship develops, and we are given an insight into the nightmares Dijilali suffers as Karim comforts him. As the bonds of friendship grow, and the mission draws ever closer, Dijilali is forced to choose between his newfound, and only true friend, or his mission, his duty, his honour.

Throughout this bonding there is an unerring sadness, tinged with gentle humour, and ultimately terror.

I mentioned Dijilali's nightmares. These are our nightmares. These two completely disparate worlds, collide an unlikely way. There are no happy endings. This isn't Hollywood, and it isn't the sort of film you can walk away from and easily forget. This is a haunting and genuinely powerful insight into a world we still know so little about. Performances are commanding, and the sadness in the eyes of the children is convincing it makes very uneasy viewing.

This is another astonishing effort from the studios of `Tales from the Orphanage', and one that is an essential piece of cinema. Both educational and depressing, this powerful film demands your attention, and once seen will stay in your mind and hearts for life..

10/10 for the movie, 7/10 for the DVD. The quality of the DVD is reasonable, although it should be noted that halfway through the 5.1 soundtrack loses synchronicity with the picture, and it is better viewed in the normal stereo mode. While subtitled, this is noticeable, and is really the only fault I can find.

Reviewers sub-notes

Killer Kid and the previously reviewed `Abandoned' are two of the most powerful films I have ever seen. They offer an incredible insight into a life that we, as Westerners, rarely see, and demonstrate how complacent we are about our own freedom and decadence. These films are not merely entertainment, and they certainly won't appeal to everyone. There is more horror in these stories than in any `proper' Hollywood horror film. True horror surrounds us every day, and for the most part goes ignored. That horror is the way our children, our FUTURE are condemned to lives of subservience, obedience, neglect and brutal cruelty.

It is sad that films like this need to made at all, but the fact they exist is a testament to the forgotten children who the world leaves behind. People NEED to see films like these. We all need our eyes opening to the real horror that surrounds us every day. Only then can we appreciate the liberties and freedom we enjoy as opposed to taking our lives for granted.


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