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"Reasonably understated and introductory...", 27 May 2015
8/10

Swiss cinematographer and documentary director Alain Margot's documentary feature which he wrote, premiered in Switzerland, was screened in the Documania section at the 25th Stockholm International Film Festival in 2014, was shot on locations in Ukraine, Russia and France and is a Swiss production which was produced by producer Caroline Velan. It tells the story about a twenty-eight-year-old person from a provincial town called Khmelnytskyi, Ukraine and her transition from painting to radical protest.

Distinctly and subtly directed by Swiss filmmaker Alain Margot, this quietly paced documentary which is narrated by the main interviewee and from multiple viewpoints, draws an unsensational portrayal of real events. While notable for its versatile and atmospheric milieu depictions, this narrative-driven story was made more than two centuries after an 18th century French thinker and mathematician named Nicolas de Condorcet (1743-1794) published a writing called For the Admission to the Right of Citizenship for Women, two hundred and thirty-eight years after the United States Declaration of Independence (1776) was adopted, two hundred and ten years after the birth of a French novelist named George Amandine Aurore Lucile Dudevant Dupin Sand (1804-1876), one hundred and eighty-four years after a French engraver named Ferdinand Victor Eugène Delacroix (1798-1863) made a painting called Liberty Leading the People (1830) where the name Marianne is of significance, one hundred and fifty-five years after A Swedish freemason named Carin Sophie Leijonhufvud Adlersparre (1823-1895) and a Swedish novelist named Rosalie Ulrika Olivecrona (1823-1898) founded a women's journal which was inspired by a 19th century novel written by a Swedish woman of letters named Fredrika Bremer (1801-1865), one hundred and forty-four years after a French author named Marie Adélaïde Deraismes (1828-1894) founded the Association for the Rights of Women with a French author named Léon Richer (1824-1911) and an American leader named Victoria Claflin Woodhull (1838-1927) and her sister named Tennesse Celeste Claflin (1844-1923) became stockbrokers, one hundred and forty-three years after a Danish historian named Georg Morris Cohen Brandes (1842-1927) translated a book by an English philosopher and political theorist named John Stuart Mill (1806-1873) called "The Subjugation of Woman" (1869) into the Danish language, one hundred and thirty-three years after a French advocate for women's rights named Hubertine Auclert (1848-1914) created a journal called The Citizeness (1881-1891), one hundred and thirty-one years after New Zealand became the first country to adopt Women's Suffrage, a Norwegian student named Ida Cecilie Thoresen Krog (1858-1911) initiated a discussion club called Skuld or gazing into the future in Norway and an organization called the Fabian Society was founded in London, England and one hundred and twenty-seven years after the first journal in Norway representing the cause of women called Nylænde or New Terrain was published and its then editor was a Norwegian journalist and teacher named Gina Jørgine Anna Sverdrup Krog (1847-1916).

Released one hundred and twenty-six years after a French journalist named Eliska Girrard Vincent (1841-1914) introduced a journal called L'Egalité or Equality, one hundred and twenty-five years after a Norwegian teacher named Ragna Vilhelmine Ullmann Nielsen (1854-1938) started the first public school in Christiania, Norway, one hundred and seventeen years after a women's union which was led by an English social reformer and Suffragist named Millicent Garrett Fawcett (1847-1929) called the National Union for Women's Suffrage Societies (1897-1917) was established and a French journalist named Marguerite Charlotte Durand (1864-1936) founded a daily newspaper called Le Fronde or The Critic (1897-1903), one hundred and eleven years after an English author and Suffragette named Emmeline Pankhurst (1859-1928) founded the Women's Social and Political Union (1903-1917) with her daughters named Christabel Harriette Pankhurst (1880-1958) and Estelle Sylvia Pankhurst (1882-1960), one hundred and one years after a French actress named Sarah Rosine Bernhardt (1844-1923) witnessed a Ukrainian ballet dancer named Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950) in a ballet called "Petrushka" (1911) and said: "I'm afraid, I'm afraid, for I am watching the world's greatest actor.", ninety-four years after a Norwegian writer named Fernanda Petra Gregorine Thomesen Nissen (1863-1920), sixty-four years after a term called McCarthyism became known in the United States and a blacklist called Red Channels was published, thirty-three years after a French writer named Yvette Roudy became the first minister of women's rights in France, four years after a Ukrainian human being and former journalist realized that in her country she could talk about freedom of speech, but not exercise it, two years after a person named Şafak Pavey who as a nineteen-year-old in the late 1990s in Zurich, Switzerland performed a humanely surpassing act, became a member of the Turkish government, one year after an English daughter, sister and journalist named Caroline Criado-Perez's appeal to the British government concerning the representation of women in British media and the lack of women on British banknotes was recognized by the Bank of England, the same year as a twenty-two-year-old Egyptian citizen named Aliaa Magda Elmahdy made a publication and one year before the people of Ireland voted in favor of the legalization of same-sex marriage, this somewhat biographical and irreverent though substantial work where freedom of expression is unrestrictedly used regardless of its apparent consequences, contains a great and timely score by composer Cristina Yakovleva.

This retelling of propagandist events which is set in Ukraine, Russia and France in the 21st century and where the emphasis is on an iconographer who in 2008 founded a now seven-year-old international women's movement with her friends from Ukraine named Anna Hutsol and Alexandra Shevchenko, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle continuity, self-explanatory archival footage and comment: "Ukraine is not a brothel." A reasonably understated and introductory documentary feature.

Encore elles! (2010) (TV)
"Generational and informative...", 27 May 2015
8/10

French screenwriters and directors Constance Ryder and Josiane Szymanski's documentary premiered in France, was shot on locations in France and is a French production. It tells the story about a radical women's only movement in France which arose after the National Union of Students of France led by a French politician named Pierre-Mendès France (1907-1982) held a protest at the Stade Sébastien Charléty in Paris, France in May 1968, and during the same decade as a Belgian photographer named Martine Franck (1938-2012) photographed the first edition of a French journal called Le Torchon Brüle (1971-1973), an association working for the cause of women was founded in France which supported the Bobigny Case (1972) and a French-Jewish attorney and former president of the European Parliament named Simone Veil adopted a law which had been introduced in 1920.

Distinctly and subtly directed by French filmmakers Constance Ryder and Josiane Szymanski, this quietly paced documentary which is narrated by French actress Valérie Coué-Sibiril and from multiple viewpoints, draws a conversational portrayal of some of the persons closest associated to a collective whose name was registered as a commercial company title by a research group called Psychoanalysis and Politics where a French essentialist named Antoinette Grugnardi Fouque and a French film producer named Sylvina Boissonnas worked and some of the persons closest associated with the succeeding generation of political groups in the Fifth French Republic. While notable for its versatile and atmospheric milieu depictions, this narrative-driven story which reflects upon ingrained and assembling work for the human condition, access to education and health services, freedom from intersectionality, more parity in the political sphere, contrary theories within the movement and female identity, reminiscences a period in time when some women questioned their heterosexuality as it was regarded as suspect, some regarded being homosexual as a political act, some thought you were born and some that you become a … , was made two hundred and twenty-five years after the Storming of the Bastille in Paris, France, one hundred and sixty-two years after a French seamstress, schoolteacher and journalist named Jeanne-Victoire Deroin (1805-1894), who in 1832 wrote an article in a journal called La Femme Libre or The Free Woman, started a newspaper called La Voix des Femmes or The Women's Voice, one hundred and four years after a French thinker named Nelly Roussel (1878-1922) said: "… declares natural equal valence and asks for social equality between both parts of human kind." ninety-eight years after the International Women's Day was held on the 8th of March for the first time in France, forty-two years after the introduction of a film festival called Musidora International Film Festival of Films by Women, thirty-nine years after an Australian-Jewish singer named Helen Maxine Lamond Reddy sang the words: "I am woman watch me grow…" and eleven years after the March of Women from the public housing against ghettos and for equality in France, and contains a great and timely score by composer Line Kruse.

This historic and recurrently relevant dialog from the early 2010s which is set in France in the 21st century one hundred and eight years after an English social reformer named Josephine Elizabeth Grey Butler (1828-1906) founded the International Abolitionist Federation and forty years after French citizens, amongst many others, named Anne Zelensky, Monique Wittig, Christine Delphy and Françoise Picq were members of minor groups which they integrated into one major and where students, authors, sociologists, jurists, founders, historians, educators and editors are interviewed individually, together and contextually and the history they've made and are still making is at the centre of this acknowledgment of some of the many voices of human beings who demands to be heard, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle continuity and archival footage. A generational and informative documentary.

Danton (1983)
"Contextually biographical...", 28 April 2015
8/10

Polish screenwriter, producer and director Andrzej Wajda's twenty-sixth feature film which was written by French screenwriter, author and actor Jean-Claude Carrière, is an adaptation of a play from 1929 by Polish author Stanislawa Przybyszewska (1901-1935). It premiered in France, was shot on locations in France and is a Poland-France co-production which was produced by producer Margaret Ménégoz. It tells the story about a French citizen, son, husband, minister of justice, revolutionary leader of the French Revolution and member of a political group called The Mountain (1792-1795) who was born in the late 1750s in a commune called Arcis-sur-Aube in the Champagne-Ardenne region during the First French Republic (1792-1804), and who in the early 1790s proposed the establishment of a court called the Revolutionary Tribunal.

Distinctly and precisely directed by Polish filmmaker Andrzej Wajda, this quietly paced fictional tale which is narrated interchangeably from multiple viewpoints though mostly from the protagonist's point of view, draws a specifically historic and rhetorically grandiloquent and humorous portrayal of a thirty-five-year-old Montagnard, orator, father and the first president of the Committee of Public Safety (1793-1795) in Paris, France named Georges Jacques Danton. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions, reverent cinematography by cinematographer Igor Luther, production design by production designer Allan Starski and costume design by costume designer Yvonne Sassinot, this dialog-driven and narrative-driven story reflects upon the history of the now two hundred and twenty-three year old French Republic and a twenty-four-year-old invisibly visible "other" named Anne Lucile Philippe Laridon Duplessis (1770-1794) with her baby in her arms who's not seen, not heard, not acknowledged, but surrounded by accusing and self-righteous voices of men.

Made three years after a trade union was founded in Gdańsk in Poland by, amongst others, a Polish politician named Lech Walęsa, five years after a Polish singer named Jacek Kaczmarski sang a song called "Mury", eighty-four years after the birth of a Polish-Jewish author named Irena Krzywicka (1899-1994), ninety-six years after a Romanian advocate named Sarmiza Bilcescu (1867-1935) became the first European woman to obtain a license to practise law from the University of Paris and hundred and ninety-two years after a human being with the first name Olympe dedicated a text called Declaration of the Rights of Woman and the Female Citizen to a person with the surname Antoinette, this retelling which is inspired by real event in the life of a renowned 18th century French advocate, depicts a dense study of character and contains a great and timely score by composer Jean Prodromidès.

This ascetic presentation with a lyrical touch from the early 1980s which is set in France in the late 18th century during The Terror (1793-1794), the unofficial reign of King Louis Charles XVII of France (1785-1795) and some years after France had adopted universal male suffrage, and where a man proclaiming to be with the people is accused of conspiracy by a representative of an assembly called the National Convention (1792-1795) named Maxmilien Robespierre, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle character development, rhythmic continuity, comment by Danton: "No more bloodshed. That's what I'm fighting for.", the versatile acting performance by French actor Gérard Depardieu and the emphatically understated acting performance by Polish actor Wojciech Pszoniak. A contextually biographical narrative feature.

"Thoughtful dialog...", 20 April 2015
8/10

French sociologist, professor and director Sylvie Tissot and French director Florence Tissot's documentary is inspired by the life and work of a 20th and 21st century French author, sociologist and lecturer. It premiered in France, was shot on locations in France and is a French production. It tells the story about a French citizen, daughter and sister named Christine Delphy who was born in France in the early 1940s, in the late 1960s participated in the establishment of a group called Feminine Masculin, who after studying at the Paris-Sorbonne university and in United States in the early 1970s and having returned to France, collaborated with a group called the Red Dykes and in the late 1970s during the Fifth French Republic and the presidency of a French politician named Valéry Giscard d'Estaing as a thirty-six-year-old founded a journal called Questions féministes later known as Nouvelles Questions féministes with a renowned French 20th century thinker.

Distinctly and subtly directed by French filmmakers Sylvie Tissot and Florence Tissot, this quietly paced documentary which is narrated mostly from the interviewees point of view, draws an educational, humorous and interesting portrayal of an influential French theoretician, materialist, woman of letters, militant advocate for women's rights and founder and member of an historic movement called the women's liberation movement, who as a thirty-two-year-old in 1971, a century after the Paris Commune (1871), participated in the first public protest in the streets asserting the right to abortion, the following year created the day for the denouncement of crimes against women with French militants Anne Zelensky and Jacqueline Feldman and during this time joined the Centre national de la recherche scientifique. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions and reverent cinematography by cinematographers Mark Tevanian and Élénore Tuisse, this narrative-driven story which reflects upon themes like the history of France, the feminist movement, national identity, friendship, parity, non-mix, unpaid domestic work, economic exploitation of women, institutionalized sexism, differences between heterosexuality and homosexuality in relation to social divisions, the theory about oppression creating gender, human knowledge and human dignity which objectively articulates and renders reason to these and its many other themes in a constructive and correlative manner.

Made forty-six-years after Christine Delphy in a common action with eight other militant feminists realized a significant action in Paris, France called the Arc de Triomphe where they laid a wreath of flowers in honor of the wife of the unknown soldier in solidarity with the striking American women from the women's liberation movement in the United States, thirty-eight years after a book called "The Main Enemy" (1977) was published and eighteen years after a Canadian singer sang the words: "…Someone is talking to me, calling my name – I'm not the one to blame – I won't be…", this thorough work of man and human portrayal reminiscences the experience of being part of a socially and politically ingrained movement of global significance which emphasized and advocated the rights of women from the viewpoint of a living witness and ongoing supporter of the feminist struggle who once realized that she was under no obligation to go out with boys and who in the late 1990s in Montreal, Canada attained her doctorate in philosophy and in the early 2000s fought against the use of feminism for racist purposes and the laws which banned Muslim girls from using headscarves in public schools and the employment of women wearing the headscarf.

This retrospectively current, contextually biographical and theoretically informative introduction and reflection on real events and former and present themes regarding the subject in question which is set in France in the 21st century and where the person in question who was radicalized in the United States where she worked with an old civil rights organization and who in the early 2000s participated in the founding of a political movement called Indigènes de la République and as a sixty-year-old became co-president of an organization called Fondation Copernic, tells her story and communicates her developed political theories, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle continuity, efficient interviewing approach, use of archival footage and comment by Christine Delphy regarding hierarchical and social divisions: "… As tortured through childhood, undergoing repeated operations, they are mutilated more than anything. They were healthy, we made them ill so as to conform to classification." A thoughtful dialog and documentary.

Wild (2014)
2 out of 5 people found the following review useful:
"Increasingly heartrending love-story...", 20 April 2015
8/10

Canadian screenwriter, film editor and director Jean-Marc Vallée's eight feature film which was written by English screenwriter and author Nick Hornby, is an adaptation of a memoir from 2012 by American author Cheryl Strayed. It premiered at the 41st Telluride Film Festival in 2014, was screened in the Gala Presentations section at the 39th Toronto International Film Festival in 2014, was shot on locations in the United States and is a U.S. production which was produced by producers Bill Pohlad, Bruna Papandrea and Reese Witherspoon. It tells the story about a citizen of America who in the late 20th century started walking from the Mexican border aiming to reach the Canadian border situated more than one thousand miles ahead of her point of departure.

Distinctly and subtly directed by Canadian filmmaker Jean-Marc Vallée, this quietly paced fictional tale which is narrated by and mostly from the main character's point of view, draws a densely literary portrayal of a twenty-six-year-old daughter, sister, wife, former waitress and aspiring writer and her sacred relationship with the person who brought her into this world. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions, reverent cinematography by cinematographer Yves Bérlanger and real locations, this character-driven and narrative-driven story about circumstantial human interaction and a person's attempt to change her life and walk herself back to the woman her mother thought she was, which was made seventeen centuries after the origination of a meditative and spiritual pilgrimage called Stations of the Cross at a place called Jerusalem, twenty-nine years after a rising eighteen-year-old American actress appeared in a feature film called "Mask" (1985), twenty-three years after an American fourteen-year- old newcomer made a lasting impression in a feature film called "The Man in the Moon" (1991), which is inspired by the personal experiences of the person who this narrative feature is inspired by and where life and the act of living holds the upper hand, depicts a heart-shaped study of character.

This reciprocally appreciative, naturally humorous, down-to-earth and life-giving retelling of an externally internal and transformational journey which is set in America in the mid-1990s and where an orphan whose father walked out of her childhood when she was a six-year-old and whose second maker went when she was a twenty-two-year-old, makes an autonomous decision and stands by it, is impelled and reinforced by its fragmented narrative structure, rhythmic continuity, evocative use of music, efficient flashback scenes, comment by a hiker: "My kind of woman.", by Cheryl: "..You are the center of me. Everything I am.", courageously humane acting performance by American actress and producer Reese Witherspoon and the ephemeral acting performance by American actress Laura Dern. An increasingly heartrending love-story and biographically reflective poem.

Gentlemen (2014/I)
0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
"Stylistically cinematographic...", 14 April 2015
8/10

Swedish screenwriter and television and film director Mikael Marcimain's second feature film which he wrote with Swedish screenwriter, translator and author Klas Östergren, is an adaptation of a novel from 1980 by Klas Östergren. It premiered in Sweden, was shot on locations in Sweden, France, Lithuania and Jutland and is a Swedish production which was produced by producers Johannes Åhlund, Mattias Nohrborg and Fredrik Heinig. It tells the story about a Swedish citizen named Klas Östergren whom whilst working at a golf club in Sweden is approached by a book publisher named Franzén who asks him to write a pastiche about a renowned literary work by a renowned Swedish author.

Distinctly and precisely directed by Swedish filmmaker Mikael Marcimain, this finely paced fictional tale which is narrated by the main characters and mostly from their viewpoints, draws a densely intriguing portrayal of a writer whom after meeting and befriending a Swedish boxer and pianist in his thirties named Henry Morgan whom is preparing for an upcoming concert at a theatre, moves in with him in his apartment in Hornsgatan, Stockholm in Sweden and begins working on his assignment. While notable for its versatile and atmospheric milieu depictions, reverent cinematography by cinematographer Jalle Kebarainen Faber, production design by production designer Linda Janson and costume design by costume designer Cilla Rörby, this character-driven and narrative-driven story, depicts some externally abridged studies of character and contains a great and timely score by composer Mattias Bärjed.

This somewhat historic, modestly romantic and literary thriller which is set in Sweden, Germany, France and Jutland mostly in the late 1960s and 1970s, partly inspired by real events and where a Swedish brother welcomes a new acquaintance into his home and starts a relation with a woman named Maud who is involved with a secretive business man, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle character development, rhythmic continuity, cinematic style of filmmaking and the engagingly understated acting performances by Swedish actors David Fukamachi Regnfors, David Dencik, Sverrir Gudnason, Swedish-Spanish actress Ruth Vega Fernandez and Swedish actress Jennie Silvferhjelm. A darkly humorous and stylistically cinematographic narrative feature.

"Conversationally and observationally reflective...", 14 April 2015
8/10

Indian screenwriter, cinematographer and documentary director Dheeraj Akolkar's documentary which he wrote, is made in relation to the hundred and fifty year anniversary of a renowned Norwegian 19th and 20th century painter. It premiered in Norway, was shot on locations in USA, Norway, France, England and India and is a Norway-Sweden co-production which was produced by producer Rune H. Trondsen. It tells the story about a Norwegian man, born on the 12th of December in 1863 in the village of Ådalsbruk in the municipality of Løten, in the county of Hedmark in Eastern Norway.

Finely and subtly directed by Indian filmmaker Dheeraj Akolkar, this quietly paced documentary which is narrated by the filmmaker, Norwegian actor Kåre Conradi and from multiple viewpoints, draws a silently revering portrayal of a son, brother and friend. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions and reverent cinematography by cinematographer Haakon Wettre, this monologue-driven story which was made hundred and fifty-three years after the birth of a Norwegian citizen named Andrea Fredrikke Emilie Milly Ihlen Thaulow (1860-1937), reminiscences and acknowledges a life through interviews with a composer, an actress, biographers, artists, museum directors and curators and contains a great and timely score by composer Stefan Nilsson.

This biographically abridged and somewhat historic remembrance and poetic portrait which is set in the United States, Norway, France, England and India in the 21st century and where flashbacks of the works and thoughts of a person are interrelated and his personality and central themes considered, is impelled and reinforced by its fragmented narrative structure, rhythmic continuity, film editing, words, illustrations, photographs and paintings and comment by a curator at the Munch Museum regarding works of art: "…Look at me and find out. What can I tell you?" A conversationally and observationally reflective documentary.

Amour fou (2014)
"Cinematographically picturesque...", 5 April 2015
8/10

Austrian screenwriter and director Jessica Hausner's fourth feature film which she wrote, is inspired by an article she came across regarding the life of a renowned German 18th and 19th century poet named Heinrich von Kleist (1777-1811). It premiered in the Un Certain Regard section at the 67th Cannes International Film Festival in 2014, was shot on locations in Germany and Luxembourg and is an Austria-Germany-Luxembourg co-production which was produced by producers Martin Gschlacht, Antonin Svoboda, Bruno Wagner, Bady Minck, Alexander Dumreicher-Ivanceanu and Philippe Bober. It tells the story about a German pianist in her early thirties named Henriette Vogel who lives in Berlin, Germany during the Kingdom of Prussia (1525-1947) with her husband named Friedrich, their daughter named Páuline and live-in maid, who wouldn't dare to demand freedom as she considers herself as the property of her spouse, and who one day is presented with a rather peculiar proposition from a German lyricist in his early thirties who stopped loving his fiancée when she wouldn't comply with his theoretically developed wish.

Distinctly and precisely directed by Austrian filmmaker Jessica Hausner, this quietly paced fictional tale which is narrated by and interchangeably and simultaneously from the protagonists' viewpoints, draws a perspicaciously philosophical, retrospectively reflective and eloquently bilateral portrayal of a Protestant Christian writer, formerly imprisoned by the French military, who perpetually and eagerly as if a hypochondriac insists on gaining the compassion of Miss Vogel and his friend named Marie. While notable for its distinctly atmospheric milieu depictions, reverent cinematography by cinematographer Martin Gschlacht, production design by production designer Katharina Wöppermann and costume design by costume designer Tanja Hausner, this dialog-driven and narrative-driven story about the egotistic, ridiculous, misunderstood and ironic aspects of a four letter word, densely and non-moralistically though virtuously reconstructs real events in accordance with the vision of the filmmaker, who made her statement six years ago, rather than in accordance with biographical facts, puts fiction and documentary up against each other and situates characters in restricted roles which makes it apparent that their every attempt at freeing themselves only leads them to the realization of what a seven letter word really is.

Made almost a century after the birth of the first Austrian woman to obtain a medical degree named Rosa Welt-Straus (1856-1938), forty-two-years after an Austrian-Jewish leader named Ernestine von Fürt (1877-1956) became the leader of the Union of Hebrew women for equal rights in Eretz Israel and twenty-four years before the son of a King named Christian VII (1749-1808) and a Queen named Caroline Mathilde (1751-1777) of Denmark and Norway wrote: "No one but we alone can be able to judge what is in the state and the people's true gain and best interest.", this master-act and midgame which plays on the supposed subconscious horrifying imagination of the audience, creates a rhythmically playful dance through radically and acutely staged perspectives which underlines its cinematic language, communicates by intention or not that poetry is anything but an innocent escapist game for children, youth or adults, that there exists a not self-evident though perceptible relation between mental illness and amour, places its empathy with the people who are carved into unquestioned and dictatorial conventions, depicts an exceptionally diverse study of character and contains some musical passages.

This darkly and abruptly humorous fairytale and unconventional character piece which is set in Germany in the early 19th century during the Romantic era (1800-1850) after the French Revolution and where roleplaying is done in a desensitizing manner which has historic undertones and emphasizes the actors' functions as modeled actors, laws were being reinforced and a well-mannered and articulate thirty-four-year-old brother and son applies his intellect and the fanciest words of his racing vocabulary to persuade those he has set his mind on to join him in his irrational plot, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle character development, rhythmic continuity, masterful dialog, advanced realism, the ever so gentle and self-explanatory comment by Henriette: "It is strange to have an illness that may not be one. A figment of the imagination which is as real as reality." by Marie: "…to see the pleasant side of…" and the outstandingly cinematic acting performances by German actor Christian Friedel and German actresses Birthe Schnöink and Sandra Hüller. A cinematographically picturesque narrative feature.

"Cinematographic and silently perspicacious...", 5 April 2015
8/10

Italian screenwriter and director Gillo Pontecorvo's feature film which he wrote with Italian author and screenwriter Franco Solinas (1927-1982), is inspired by a memory from 1962 which is based on personal experiences. It premiered In competition at the 27th Venice Film Festival in 1966, was shot on locations in Algeria and is an Italy-Algeria co-production which was produced by producer Saadi Yacef. It tells the story about the political and ideologically ingrained liberation front in Algeria, the militaristic and ideologically ingrained French Army and the people of Algeria who had been living under the Regency of Algiers (1525-1830) and under French rule since the annexation of Algiers, Algeria in 1830 by the then Kingdom of France and how they changed the history of Algeria.

Distinctly and precisely directed by Italian filmmaker Gillo Pontecorvo (1919-2006), this quietly paced fictional tale which is narrated by a narrator and interchangeably from multiple viewpoints, draws a densely measured and retrospective portrayal of a mid-20th century war regarding colonization and a country's struggle for independence and self-determination whilst living under the rule of another country. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions and reverent cinematography by Italian cinematographer Marcello Gatti (1924- 2013), this narrative-driven story about paramilitary recruitment, bilateral relations between France and Algeria and the strategic, totalitarian and barbaric methods used by both sides of this massacre of human lives which were as atrocious as those used in the preceding Second World War (1939-1945) where France, amongst many other countries, was annexed by Germany and a precursor of numerous later wars which continued the annihilation of the living, the convenience of impunity which exemplifies inequality for all those human beings on this planet who has and has had the ability to go through this life without killing anyone of their fellow human beings and the should be abolished and spiritless culture and industry of death where saving bullets is prioritized over saving lives, reflects this historic, incoherent, unjustifiable and downright ignorant notion that a five letter word can only be achieved through violation of international law and the sometimes though not always unintentional murder and slaughter of both involved and neutral bystanders which at any given time might be babies or children guilty only of being born, whose deaths are under no circumstances defensible by this la-la land term called collateral damage, and is no eulogy or glorification, reverence or vindication of retaliating militaristic violence concealed by grandiloquent codes of honor, but rather an understated elegy which was initiated by a living insider witness of these historical events and member of the National Liberation Front Algerian and made eighteen years after many Palestinian Arabs were driven of their homes in Israel, escaped and laws were passed by the introductory Israeli government which prevented them from returning to their homes or claiming their property.

Released many years after an Egyptian goddess named Isis may or may not have existed in ancient Egypt, three years after a French filmmaker made a narrative feature called "Muriel" (1963), two years before a person with the given name Susan wrote: "I'm learning to bring judgment against the world.", six years before an American filmmaker named Dick Richard made a feature film regarding a sixteen-year-old man who dreamed of becoming a cowboy, was recruited by a group of cowboys, got the feeling of belongingness, started believing that his leader was sent to do what he did by … and ended up on the prairie holding his hat on his chest whilst a river was running out from his eyes after having buried all of his friends in the ground whilst a song written by an English poet in the late 1790s called "Amazing Grace" was sung by a female voice, eleven years before the guillotine was abolished in France, twenty-four years before an American group of musicians called Guns N'Roses sang the words: "…and history hides the lies of our civil wars…", twenty-five-years before an American singer and pianist with the middle name Ellen sang the words: "…I've been looking for a savior in these dirty streets…", forty-six years after a twenty-six-year- old Tunisian street hawker ended in self-immolation in Ben Arou, Tunisia after allegedly having been assaulted by a female municipal officer and in doing so initiated a revolution, forty-eight years after a Norwegian singer named Anne Grete Preus sang the words: "… consider carefully what you should mean - - it can become costly to stand alone…" which originated from an ironic poem written in 1963 by a Norwegian 20th century author and eyewitness of this battle named Jens Ingvald Bjørneboe (1920-1976) and forty-nine years after an Iranian-Swedish émigré, refugee and musician sang her own written words: "…Just because its black in the dark - - doesn't mean there's no colors…", depicts some dense studies of character and contains a great and timely score by Italian composers Gillo Pontecorvo and Ennio Morricone.

This historic, reflective and humane testimony and reconstruction of real events from the late 1960s which is set in Algeria in the late 1950s and early 1960s when a French-Algerian historian named Danièle Djamila Amrane-Minne collaborated with the persons who were most instrumental in the armed conflict, and where the actions and the views of men from both sides are presented and informatively depicted, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle character development and continuity, the self-explanatory and alluding comment by a member of the French army after dressing an Algerian prisoner in a French uniform: "Now, he is nationalized." and the many good acting performances by French and Algerian citizens, actors and actresses. A cinematographic and silently perspicacious narrative feature.

"Silent dance of glances...", 1 April 2015
8/10

French screenwriter and director Benoït Jacquot's twentieth feature film which he wrote with French screenwriter and author Gilles Taurand, is an adaptation of an eponymous novel from 2002 by French author Chantal Thomas. It premiered In competition at the 62nd Berlin International Film Festival in 2012, was shot on locations in France and is a France-Spain co-production which was produced by producers Jean-Pierre Guérin, Kristina Larsen and Pedro Uriol. It tells the story about a French servant and seamstress who lives in a room at the Palace of Versailles in France with a friend named Alice.

Distinctly and precisely directed by French filmmaker Benoït Jacquot, this quietly paced fictional tale which is narrated by and mostly from the main character's point of view, draws a gripping portrayal of a person who before the establishment of the French National Assembly, the March on Versailles, a speech by a French attorney named Maxmilien François Marie Isidore de Robespierre (1758-1794) where he articulated a transcending motto which may have appeased the ingrained and unwavering advocates of total equality by adding a word which in all fairness is just as significant and during the beginning of the French Revolution (1789-1799) and the Great Fear when an announcement regarding citizens of the then Kingdom of France (843-1792) who were to be guillotined for the sake of a reform was announced, aspires to serve a Queen of Austrian origins named Marie-Antoinette Joséphe Jeanne de Habsbourg-Lorraine (1755-1793). While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions, majestically cinematic cinematography by cinematographer Romain Winding, production design by production designer Katia Wyszkop and costume design by costume designer Christian Gasc, this character-driven and dialog-driven story about famine, monarchy, social insurrection and a pivotal time in French history when present political ideologies were being developed and where a royal daughter, sister, wife and mother who did not chose to be a royalist is imprisoned by her passions and a person who isn't of the aristocracy plays on her mistress' passion, using herself as an instrument, to gain her objective, depicts an enigmatic study of character and contains a great and timely score by composer Bruno Coulais.

This historic and understatedly romantic silent dance of glances within interior surroundings which is set in the late 18th century in France during the reign of King Louis-Auguste XVI (1754-1793) and where a reader understands whom she has to reach to get to where she is headed, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle character development, rhythmic continuity, comment by Marie-Antoinette: "Have you ever been attracted…?" and the reverent acting performances by French actress Léa Seydoux, German actress Diane Krüger and French actress Julie-Marie Parmentier. A virtuously cinematographic and densely literary narrative feature.


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