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SindreKaspersen

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542 reviews in total 
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"Distinguishably cinematographic, commendably exaggerated...", 15 April 2014
8/10

Swedish director Fredrik Bond's feature film debut which was written by screenwriter Matt Drake, premiered in the Premieres section at the 29th Sundance Film Festival in 2013, was screened In competition at the 63rd Berlin International Film Festival in 2013, was shot on locations in USA and Romania and is a USA-Romania co-production which was produced by producers William Horberg and Craig J. Flores. It tells the story about a man named Charlie Countryman whom after a conversation with his mother who gives him an encouragement, travels from Chicago, USA to Bucharest, Romania where he meets a Romanian musician named Gabriela Ibanescu.

Distinctly and engagingly directed by Swedish filmmaker Fredrik Bond, this finely paced fictional tale which is narrated mostly from the main character's point of view, draws a multifaceted and riveting portrayal of a person's journey to a foreign country, his affection for a female cello player and his encounter with a man named Nigel. While notable for its distinct and atmospheric milieu depictions, prominent cinematography by Russian cinematographer Roman Vayanov, production design by production designer Joel Collins, costume design by costume designer Jennifer Johnson and use of sound, colors and light, this character-driven and narrative-driven story where rationality is surpassed by a less blocking kind of rationality, depicts a humane study of character and contains a great and timely score by composer Christophe Beck and Deadmono.

This quick-witted, freshly romantic and eloquently cinematic indie which is set in Romania in the 1990s and where an American man's heart leads him into a righteous and risky pursue for someone whom has made him realize that it is still worth fighting for someone, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, substantial character development, rhythmic continuity, variegated characters, spiritual undertones, use of music, the involving acting performances by American actor Shia LaBeouf, American actresses Evan Rachel Wood and Melissa Leo and the noteworthy acting performance by Danish actor Mads Mikkelsen. A distinguishably cinematographic, commendably exaggerated and charismatic narrative feature.

Concussion (2013)
"Psychologically involving, reflective and communicative...", 15 April 2014
8/10

American screenwriter, producer and director Stacie Passon's feature film debut which she wrote, premiered in the U.S. Dramatic section at the 29th Sundance Film Festival in 2013, was screened in the Panorama section at the 63rd Berlin International Film Festival in 2013, was shot on locations in USA and is an American production which was produced by American producer and director Rose Troche. It tells the story about a dutiful 42-year-old American mother named Abby Ableman whom after an incident begins fixing an apartment with a friend named Justin.

Distinctly and subtly directed by American filmmaker Stacie Passon, this finely paced fictional tale which is narrated mostly from the main character's point of view, draws a rarely straightforward, normative and understanding portrayal of a woman whom after having experienced a head injury makes a decision which could prevent her from dying internally of boredom or end her marriage. While notable for its naturalistic and atmospheric milieu depictions, reverent cinematography by cinematographer David Kruta, production design by production designer Lisa Mayers, distant and far from stereotypical depiction of partnership, trendy choice of themes which serves the representation of the protagonist and use of light, this character-driven and narrative-driven story about a cinematic universe of women where men are neither excluded or significantly prioritized, where labeling, voyeurism and crowd-pleasing narrative choices are commendably surpassed by consideration of character and where a person in a mid-life situation whom has become so alienated from herself that she has to do something to regain what she has drifted so far away from, depicts a dense and in-depth study of character and contains a good score by composer Barb Morrison.

This freshly humorous, unconventionally conversational and non- moralizing though liable indie which is set in the U.S. in the 21st century, and where a wife agrees to a suggestion which becomes an escape from her earth-bounded life with her son, stepdaughter and spouse, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, substantial character development, subtle continuity, distinct film editing, variegated characters and perspectives and the assured and authentic acting performances by American television and film actresses Robin Weigert and Maggie Siff. A psychologically involving, reflective and communicative narrative feature.

Philomena (2013)
"Reconciling, humanly reflective and informative...", 10 April 2014
8/10

English producer and television and film director Stephen Frears' twenty-first feature film which was written by screenwriters Jeff Pope and Steve Coogan, is an adaptation of a novel from 2009 called "The Lost Child of Philomena Lee" by English author and broadcaster Martin Sixsmith. It premiered In competition at the 70th Venice Film Festival in 2013, was screened in the Special Presentations section at the 38th Toronto International Film Festival in 2013, was shot on locations in England, Northern Ireland and USA and is a UK-USA-France co-production which was produced by producers Gabrielle Tana, Steve Coogan and Tracey Seaward. It tells the story about a middle-aged Irish Roman Catholic mother named Philomena Lee who lives in England, and whom has spent the last five decades searching for her son named Antony whom she gave birth to as an adolescent girl in Ireland in 1952.

Distinctly and engagingly directed by English filmmaker Stephen Frears, this quietly paced and somewhat fictional tale which is narrated from multiple viewpoints though mostly from the main character's point of view, draws a crucial portrayal of an English husband and former Roman Catholic named Martin Sixsmith whom in the early 21st century whilst planning to write a book about Russian history, meets a woman named Jane who tells him about her mother whose child was taken away from her after she had been denounced by her family and sent to a convent called Sean Ross Abbey in Roscrea, Ireland in the mid-20th century. While notable for its naturalistic and atmospheric milieu depictions, reverent cinematography by cinematographer Robbie Ryan, production design by production designer Alan Macdonald, costume design by costume designer Consolata Boyle and use of sound, colors and light, this dialog-driven and narrative-driven story about institutions or homes for girls and women operated by churches in Ireland from the 18th century until the 20th century called Magdalen laundries or asylums where so-called "fallen" women were enslaved due to the at that time conviction that having intercourse with men or mothering a child before marriage was a grievous sin which had to be punished with unpaid labor and by taking away their children, and the cost this has had and still has on human lives, depicts two complementing studies of character and contains a great and timely score by composer Alexandre Desplat.

This biographical, quick-witted, densely historic and non-judgmental though far from unconditionally exonerating drama which is set in Ireland in the early 1950s and in England, Ireland and America in the early 2000s, which is inspired by real events in the life of an Irish woman, an Irish-American son and an English man, and where a former nurse who justly wishes to find out what actually happened to her son, acquaints a former journalist who begins considering writing a human interest story, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, substantial character development, subtle continuity, involving conversations about faith, the evocative flashback scenes and the authentic acting performances by English actress Judi Dench and English actor Steve Coogan. A reconciling, humanly reflective and informative narrative feature which gained, among other awards, the award for Best Screenplay at the 70th Venice Film Festival in 2013.

"Conscientiously stated and important...", 9 April 2014
8/10

French screenwriter, actress and director Emmanuelle Bercot's television film which she wrote, is an adaptation of a memoir written by a French former student prostitute named Laura D which was published by Max Milo Éditions in 2008. It premiered in France, was shot on locations in France and is a French production which was produced by producers Denis Pineau-Valencienne and Francois Kraus. It tells the story about a French nineteen-year-old female student of applied foreign languages with a part-time job to support her studies named Laura who lives in an apartment in the city of Besancon, France with her boyfriend. One night after a conversation regarding their shared expenses, Laura goes on the internet to find a second job and discovers an ad placed by a man in his fifties whom is looking for a masseuse.

Distinctly and acutely directed by French filmmaker Emmanuelle Bercot, this quietly paced and somewhat fictional tale which is narrated mostly from the main character's point of view, draws an unsentimental and heartrending portrayal of a struggling independent-minded daughter of a nurse and a mason who due to the situation she is in where she experiences that she has no choice decides to engage in what an American activist named Carol Leigh coined as "sex work" in 1978, and how this affects her attempt at preserving a natural relationship with a thirty-year-old man named Benjamin. While notable for its naturalistic milieu depictions, reverent cinematography by cinematographer Christophe Offenstein, production design by production designer Eric Barboza, costume design by costume designer Marité Coutard and use of colors and light, this character-driven and narrative-driven story about the gracelessness, desolation, political influences and unforeseeable dangers concerning this kind of 21st century capitalistic free trade which increases objectification, social stigmatization, crime, misandry and utopian notions of sex equaling happiness, and the irrevocable abandonment and compromising of crucial human values, depicts a humane and incisive study of character where a freshman whom is set on becoming a translator or an interpreter apathetically and with external confidence takes on a role she thinks she is able to live in without having to sacrifice her emotional integrity.

This densely biographical, contrastingly romantic and at times eloquently humorous drama which is set in France in the late 2000s, which commendably envisages the correlation between acting and prostitution regarding the art of impersonation and how remotely far from dignifying, wonderful or intriguing prostitution is, and where a person tells the person whom he regards as a purchasable object and commodity with the function of realizing his underdeveloped fantasies that he has ethics, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, substantial character development, rhythmic continuity, use of music, distinct and atmospheric realism, comment : "I have too many revolting images in my head", the admirable acting performance by Belgian actress Déborah Francois and the good acting performances by French actors Alain Couchi and Mathieu Demy. A conscientiously stated and important reconstruction of real events.

"Informative, straightforward and vindicating...", 2 April 2014
8/10

English author, biographer and documentary filmmaker Alan G Parker's debut documentary feature, is inspired by a letter he received from an English mother named Anne J Beverly and twenty-two years of investigation. It premiered in the United States, was shot on locations in England and America and is a UK production which was produced by producers Ben Timlett and Christine Alderson. It tells the story about a son from Lewisham, London, England and a daughter from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA who spent a fatal night at a hotel called the Chelsea Hotel in New York City, U.S. in early October 1978.

Precisely and engagingly directed by English filmmaker Alan G Parker, this finely paced documentary which is narrated by UK radio program director Tony Hertz and from multiple viewpoints, draws a multifaceted, involving and somewhat subjective portrayal of an unsolved late 20th century American murder case which was closed after the death of the prime suspect in 1979, and of a young man and woman who became far more useful to the world than the word Punk would imply considering, without moralizing, those who profited from their passing. Through interviews with Punk rockers, friends of Sid, friends of Nancy, a filmmaker, a photographer, former members of the Sex Pistols (1975-1978), Sex Pistols' manager, a biographer and people who either knew of or had met Sid and Nancy, this narrative-driven and interview-driven story from the late 2000s about anarchism and a gravitating requiem for living up to an unattainable myth which is a re-examining and investigative attempt to prove the innocence of a prolific member of an historical late 1970s Punk rock band which was formed in London, England during a time when more than a million people were unemployed, former politician Margaret Thatcher (1925-2013) became leader of the Tory Party and the Sex Discrimination Act 1975 was initiated, comes up with a plausible theory regarding what actually happened thirty-six years ago at hotel room 100 where a woman in her early twenties died from a knife wound in her abdomen and her boyfriend was arrested by the New York Police Department.

This biographical, historic, cautionary and humanly humorous remembrance of a disenchanting temporary romance between a punk rocker, performer, friend and fatherless only child and a groupie, sister and friend who nearly died after her birth which stands as an underlined warning and which densely examines the history of Punk and the personalities of Sid Vicious (1957-1979) and Nancy Spungen (1958-1978) through the stories of some of the people who witnessed their lives, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle continuity, bilateral stories and use of music, animation and archival footage. An informative, straightforward and vindicating documentary feature.

"A mindful reminiscence...", 2 April 2014
8/10

English author, screenwriter and director Alex Cox's second feature film which he co-wrote with screenwriter Abbe Wool, is inspired by real events in the life of a 20th century English musician named John Simon Ritchie aka John Beverly aka Sid Vicious and an American-Jewish groupie named Nancy Laura Spungen. It premiered in the Directors' Fortnight section at the 39th Cannes International Film Festival in 1986, was shot on locations in England, USA and France and is a UK production which was produced by producer Eric Fellner. It tells the story about a twenty-one-year-old bassist in an English Punk rock band called The Sex Pistols (1975-1978) named Sid and a twenty-year-old woman named Nancy.

Distinctly and precisely directed by English filmmaker Alex Cox, this finely paced and somewhat fictional tale which is narrated mostly from the two main characters' viewpoints, draws a dense portrayal of a renowned and deadly real-life romance between two heroin addicts. While notable for its distinct and atmospheric milieu depictions, reverent cinematography by cinematographer Roger A. Deakins, production design by production designer Andrew McAlpine, costume design by costume designers Cathy Cook and Theda De Ramus and use of sound, colors and light, this character-driven and narrative-driven story which had the initial title "Love Kills", depicts two unorthodox studies of character and contains a variegated score by composers Joe Strummer, The Pogues and Pray For Rain.

This somewhat biographical, occasionally humorous and surreal all though pointedly factual indie from the late 1980s which is set in England and America in the late 1970s during the early years of the punk subculture and which reconstructs scenes from the lives of two human beings who lived together for two years and whose prominence increased after having spent two decades amongst the living, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle character development and continuity, scenes between Sid and Nancy and prominently by the memorable acting performances by English actor and director Gary Oldman and American actress Chloe Webb. An ascetic love-story and a mindful reminiscence where reality surpasses fiction.

"Resonating and profoundly elegiac...", 20 March 2014
8/10

Scottish screenwriter and director Paul Wright's feature film debut which he wrote, premiered in the International Critics' Week section at the 66th Cannes International Film Festival in 2013, was screened in the Michael Powell Award Competition section at the 67th Edinburgh International Film Festival in 2013, was shot on locations in Scotland and is a UK production which was produced by producers Mary Burke and Polly Stokes. It tells the story about a son and brother named Aaron who lives with his mother named Cathy in Gourdon, Aberdeenshire in Scotland. After returning from a fishing boat accident where his brother named Michael and four other men were taken by the sea, the citizens of the community wonders why he doesn't have any memory of what happened and places the blame for the accident on him. Although Aaron becomes alienated, he is convinced that his brother his still alive.

Distinctly and acutely directed by Scottish filmmaker Paul Wright, this quietly paced fictional tale which is narrated by the main character and mostly from his viewpoint, draws a heartrendingly reflective portrayal of a sole survivor whom whilst missing his brother hangs on to a childhood story his mother used to tell him and his brother when they got scared, and turns to his brother's girlfriend named Jane whom he thinks is the only one that will believe him. While notable for its naturalistic, distinct and atmospheric milieu depictions, versatile cinematography by cinematographer Benjamin Kracun, production design by production designer Simon Rogers and use of sound, colors and light, this character-driven, monologue-driven and narrative-driven story where a fairy-tale becomes a reality to a person who believes that everything will be fine again if he can bring his brother back, depicts a densely internal study of character and contains a great and timely score by composer Erik Enocksson.

This eloquently mysterious, distinguishable and somewhat sociological indie which is set in a coastal village in Scotland in the 21st century and where the one who were not taken by the sea takes on a responsibility for something he isn't responsible for so that things can return to the way they were and a mother stands by her ostracized son, is impelled and reinforced by its fragmented narrative structure, substantial character development, rhythmic continuity, powerful use of music, remarkable use of flashback scenes, humane examination of its central themes, the singular acting performance by English actor George Mackay and the reverent acting performances by Scottish actress Kate Dickie, English actress Nichola Burley and Scottish actor Jordan Young. A resonating and profoundly elegiac audio-visual poem for those in peril at sea which gained the Douglas Hickox Award Paul Wright at the 16th Möet British Independent Film Awards in 2013.

Quid Pro Quo (2008/I)
"Serene, romantic and surreal...", 13 March 2014
7/10

Director and screenwriter Carlos Brooks' feature film debut which he wrote, is inspired by an idea he had. It premiered in the American Spectrum section at the 24th Sundance Film Festival in 2008, was shot on locations in USA and is an American production which was produced by producers Sarah Pillsbury and Midge Sanford. It tells the story about a man with a paraplegic injury he got from an auto accident in the late 1980s named Isaac Knott who lives in New York, USA and who works for a radio company called Pure and Wise. After being informed by his co-worker named Edie about a caller whom has requested to meet him, Isaac begins working on a story about people who wishes to have their body parts amputated so that they can live their lives in a chair like he does.

Distinctly and subtly directed by filmmaker Carlos Brooks, this quietly paced fictional tale which is narrated by the main character and mostly from his point of view, draws an understanding portrayal of an American radio host whom during his investigation of people with several forms of a psychiatric condition called Body integrity identity disorder, acquaints a single woman named Fiona who tells him that she specializes in Chinese art and ice cream. While notable for its distinct and atmospheric milieu depictions, reverent cinematography by cinematographer Michael McDonough, production design by production designer Roshelle Berliner and use of sound, colors and light, this character-driven and narrative-driven story about wannabes, pretenders and persons who for some reason think that the only way they can achieve completeness as human beings is by having an arm or a leg surgically removed, self-deception as a means for self-preservation and possibly sickly or irrational pangs of conscience, depicts a singular study of character and contains a great and timely score by composer Mark Mothersbaugh.

This densely psychological, naturally humorous, cinematic and philosophically conversational indie from the late 2000s which is set during an autumn in America in the 21st century, where incomplete fictitious characters makes utopian deals with each other and where a man who claims that his ex-girlfriend named Raine broke up with him because he is a person with a disability and who although not believing in hope, hopes that he will walk again someday, finds a pair of effective shoes and a quid pro quo girl who not only has no apprehensions about him being in a wheelchair but also wishes to be in his situation, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, substantial character development, subtle continuity and the involving acting performances by American actor Nick Stahl and American actress Vera Farmiga. A serene, romantic and surreal narrative feature.

"Prominently austere, retrospective and heartrending...", 11 March 2014
7/10

Norwegian screenwriter and director Anja Breien's sixth feature film which she wrote, premiered In competition at the 38th Venice Film Festival in 1981, was shot on locations in Norway and is a Norway-Sweden co-production which was produced by producer Gunnar Svensrud. It tells the story about a Swedish woman named Eli Laupstad who one day arrives at the place where her ancestors once lived called Jotunheimen in Norway. After meeting and acquainting a local woman named Ingeborg Eriksdottir who lives there, Eli is provided with a place to stay in return for work and starts settling there.

Subtly and precisely directed by Norwegian filmmaker Anja Breien, this quietly paced fictional tale which is narrated from multiple viewpoints though mostly from the main character's point of view, draws an increasingly dramatic portrayal of a woman whose new life at a new place changes after she meets a Norwegian farmer named Aslak Gimra whom she takes a liking to. While notable for its naturalistic and atmospheric milieu depictions, reverent cinematography by Norwegian cinematographer Erling-Thurmann Andersen, low-keyed production design by production designer Ulf Axén, costume design by Norwegian costume designer and production designer Anne Siri Bryhni and use of sound, colors and light, this character-driven and narrative-driven story about superstitious persecution, unproven verdicts, the annihilating consequences of sectarianism and the beheading and burning of women who were accused of having supernatural powers in Norway as they were in numerous other countries, depicts a dense and mysterious study of character and contains a great and timely score by composer Arne Nordheim.

This historic and somewhat romantic drama from the early 1980s which is set in the Norwegian highlands in South Norway in the early 16th century during the reign of King Christian IV of Denmark-Norway and the Thirty Years' War (1618-1648), is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle character development and continuity and the commendable acting performances by Swedish actress Lil Terselius, Norwegian actor Bjørn Skagestad and Swedish actress Anita Björk. A prominently austere, retrospective and heartrending narrative feature which gained the Premio Pasinetti Award Lil Terselius at the 38th Venice Film Festival in 1981.

Blessed (2009/I)
"Cinematographic, heart-shaped and earth-bounded...", 10 March 2014
8/10

Australian screenwriter and director Ana Kokkinos' third feature film which was written by dramatists and screenwriters Andrew Bovell, Melissa Reeves, Patricia Cornelius and Christos Tsiolkas, is an adaptation of their play called "Who's Afraid of the Working Class" from 1999 which they co-wrote with playwright Irine Vela. It premiered in Australia, was screened in the Contemporary World Cinema section at the 34th Toronto International Film Festival in 2009, in the Official Selection section at the 57th San Sebastián International Film Festival in 2009, was shot on locations in Australia and is an Australian production which was produced by producer Al Clark. It tells the story about a 15-year-old boy named Daniel, a student named Katrina, a brother named Orton, a sister named Stacey and a sister and brother named Trisha and Arthur whom has left their homes.

Distinctly and precisely directed by Australian filmmaker Ana Kokkinos, this quietly paced fictional tale which is narrated firstly by the children, lastly by the mothers and from multiple viewpoints, draws an increasingly reflective and heartrending portrayal of twenty-four hours in the life of five mothers and their children. While notable for its distinct and atmospheric milieu depictions, reverent cinematography by Australian cinematographer Geoff Burton, production design by production designer Simon Mccutcheon, film editing by film editor Jill Bilcock and use of sound, colors and light, this character-driven and narrative-driven story about ingrained relations between parents and children where a fashion designer named Gina worries about her son's whereabouts, an 18-year-old contacts a man he met at a party, a brother asks his sister about their stepfathers and two friends goes looking for new clothes rather than going home after their school day has ended, depicts multiple dense and interrelated studies of character and contains a great and timely score by Polish composer Cezary Skubiszewski.

This generational, situational, at times humorous, somewhat melodramatic and engagingly conversational drama from the late 2000s which is set in Melbourne, Australia in the 21st century, where a distinct and noteworthy filmmaker surpasses her previous feature films and where a pregnant mother named Rhonda is introduced to her new case manager named Gail, an old lady misses her son named Jimmy, and a single mother named Bianca encounters a generous father named Peter, is impelled and reinforced by its fragmented narrative structure, subtle character development and continuity, mindful examination of its variegated and significant themes, graceful and rare scenes between Orton and Stacey and the acutely interconnected acting performances by Australian actresses Frances O'Connor, Deborra-Lee Furness, Miranda Otto and all the actors and actresses in the roles as the children. A cinematographic, heart-shaped and earth-bounded character piece.


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