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SindreKaspersen

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"Venerable remembrance...", 5 September 2014
8/10

Swedish screenwriters, producers and directors Magnus Gretten and Stefan Berg's documentary feature which they co-wrote, is inspired by real events in the life of a prominent and renowned Swedish 20th century musician, poet and author. It premiered in Sweden, was screened in the Nordic Focus section at the 42nd Norwegian International Film Festival Haugesund, was shot on locations in Nicaragua, Italy, Sweden and Norway and is a Swedish production which was produced by producer Lennart Ström. It tells the story about a son, brother, father, friend, guitarist, singer, Swedish citizen, fellow human being and peasant from Hakarp, Sweden named Björn Afzelius who was born in Huskvarna, Sweden in the late 1940s and who in the early 1970s joined a band called Hoola Bandoola Band.

Subtly and finely directed by Swedish filmmakers Magnus Gretten and Stefan Berg, this quietly paced documentary which is narrated from multiple viewpoints, draws an unforgettably gripping portrayal of a person who loved music, Cuba, Italy, American country music, women, sports and his daughters, and whose lyrics echoed, still does and eternally will from human to human and from nation to nation. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions and reverent cinematography by cinematographer Stefan Berg, this narrative-driven story about a man who wasn't appreciated by the media in his own country, was taught by his mother, who supported liberation movements in the Latin-American countries living under dictatorship, sang for the people and translated a Cuban song which he called "Sång till friheten", contains insightful interviews of friends, fellow musicians, former girlfriends, band members, family members and a reflectively heartfelt interview with Norwegian musician Åge Aleksandersen.

This densely biographical and historic, warmly humorous and heartrendingly elegiac representation of a heart-shaped proof of humanity's existence which is set mostly in Sweden in the 21st century and where a songwriter who was accepted and loved for who he was in Norway, played at clubs in Malmö, Sweden, went to Cuba in 1978 and became a persona non grata is dearly remembered, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle continuity, use of music, concert tour footage, photographs and lyrics sung by Björn Afzelius: "Yes one says much but knows little about oneself when anxiety and loneliness comes. Cause when friends disappear and love ends, one sees things with somewhat different eyes…" A venerable remembrance and veraciously evocative documentary feature.

2 out of 3 people found the following review useful:
"Cinematically realistic, resonating...", 3 September 2014
8/10

Belgian screenwriters, producers and directors Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne's ninth feature film which they co-wrote and produced, premiered In competition at the 67th Cannes International Film Festival in 2014, was screened at the 42nd Norwegian International Film Festival Haugesund in 2014, was shot on locations in Belgium and is a France-Belgium-Italy co-production which was produced by producer Denis Freyd. It tells the story about a mother named Sandra Bya whom whilst dealing with illness and learning from hearsay that her job is at risk, contacts the person accused of the rumor and asks permission to start a secret ballot.

Distinctly and engagingly directed by Belgian filmmakers Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne, this finely paced fictional tale which is narrated mostly from the protagonist's point of view, draws an immediate and interactive portrayal of a working-class husband and wife whom is raising their adolescent son and daughter. While notable for its distinct and atmospheric milieu depictions and reverent cinematography by cinematographer Alain Marcoen, this character-driven and narrative-driven story about a person whom whilst barely hanging on begins fighting with everything she has in her to prevent her employees from taking her work away from her, by a duo of filmmakers who remains in reminiscence for a thematically related feature film, depicts a dense study of character.

This socio-political, somewhat conversational and increasingly heartrending character piece which is set in Belgium in the 21st century and where a Belgian citizen has to locate every one of her sixteen co-workers whom has been promised a bonus and ask them to vote in favor of her keeping her job, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, substantial character development, rhythmic continuity, use of music, comment by Sandra : "Thank you for your support…" and the timely understated and noteworthy acting performance by French actress and singer Marion Cotillard. A cinematically realistic, resonating and ingeniously democratic narrative feature.

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
"Informatively biographical, at times astonishing...", 3 September 2014
8/10

Screenwriters, producers and directors John Maloof and Charlie Siskel's documentary feature which they co-wrote and produced, is inspired by real events in the life of a 20th and 21st century American street photographer. It premiered in the Documentaries section at the 38th Toronto International Film Festival in 2013, was screened in the Panorama section at the 64th Berlin International Film Festival in 2014 and is an American production which was shot on locations in America, France and England. It tells the story about a photographer who in the late 2000s in America, found some property which belonged to a nanny.

Distinctly and engagingly directed by filmmakers John Maloof and Charlie Siskel, this finely paced documentary which is narrated by John Maloof and interchangeably from multiple viewpoints, draws a gripping and multifaceted portrayal of secretive activities which began in early 20th century France. While notable for its versatile milieu depictions and reverent cinematography by cinematographer John Maloof, this narrative-driven story about the eccentricities, family relations, interpersonal relations, identities and views on humanity and men of the person in question where interviews with friends, family members, photographers and acquaintances communicates objective stories about someone who got significantly near whilst keeping a pivotal distance, depicts an extraordinary and unsettlingly in-depth study of character and contains a timely instrumental score.

This somewhat historic, humorous and atmospheric found photography documentary which is set mostly in America and France in the 21st century, where an, according to this representation, reclusive and autonomous person is given to the limelight and where the unpublished work of a daughter and sister who managed to remain a mystery for as long as she could is presented, is impelled and reinforced by its fragmented narrative structure, substantial and cinematically appropriate character development, rhythmic continuity, psychological undertones, noteworthy examination of its central theme and the bilateral photographs. An informatively biographical, at times astonishing and ingeniously photographic documentary feature.

"Investigative biographical mystery...", 29 August 2014
8/10

French-Swiss producer and director Barbet Schroeder's documentary feature is based on his opinions about his main interviewee. It premiered in the Un Certain Regard section at the 60th Cannes International Film Festival in 2007, was shot on locations in Algeria, France, Cambodia and Lebanon and is a French production which was produced by producer Rita Dagher. It tells the story about a person of Vietnamese and French origins who was born in Thailand on the 5th of March in 1925, raised on Réunion Island in France, taken to a mass grave by his parents as a ten-year-old, served his initial service as a seventeen-year-old, joined the French Communist Party as a twenty-year-old, studied literature and eastern languages in Paris, France, began studying law as a thirty-year-old after his twin-brother named Paul Vergès was arrested for the murder of a political opponent of his father named Raymond Vergès and as a thirty-two-year-old lawyer was introduced to an Algerian Muslim and political activist named Zohra Drif and asked to defend an Algerian member of the National Liberation Front Algeria named Djamila Bouhired.

Distinctly and precisely directed by French-Swiss filmmaker Barbet Schroeder, this finely paced documentary which is narrated interchangeably from multiple viewpoints though mostly from the central person's point of view, draws an informative portrayal of a son, brother, husband, father, anti-colonist and renowned 20th and 21st century author and defense attorney with both French and Algerian citizenship named Jacques Vergès (1925-2013), and his relationship with his clients. While notable for its versatile milieu depictions and reverent cinematography by cinematographers Caroline Champetier and Jean-Paul Perrard, this narrative-driven story about the history of international terrorism and France-Algeria relations, connections, colonialism leading to anarchy, terrorism and war and what it is like for people to live in colonized countries, where interviews with friends, Cambodian, Algerian, Palestinian, German and Lebanese freedom fighters, members of Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, members of Khmer Rouge, members of Revolutionary Cells, secret service agents, Stasi agents, revolutionary Islamists and Christians, journalists, jurists, collaborators, politicians, historians and philosophers talks about their experiences, political views and views on the person in question, depicts a majestic and mysterious study of character and contains a great and timely score by composer Jorge Arrigada.

This somewhat humorous though thematically on the contrary, poignantly atmospheric and retrospectively historic documentary feature from the late 2000s which is set in the late 20th century and early 21st century in European, Middle eastern and Asian countries and where the life of a profound jurist and character with character who surpasses many great acting performances in cinema history, who defended terrorists, dictators and war criminals, who worked in mysterious ways and who in the 1970s after having gotten married with a client and converted to Islam went incognito for eight years, is placed into an historical context which commendably emphasizes the irrevocable consequences of terrorism and how closely associated state officials are with militant groups, is impelled and reinforced by its fragmented narrative structure, rhythmic continuity, cinematic use of archival footage, news articles and photographs, interviews which ranges from Tunisian journalist Lionel Duroy, German former exile Hans-Joachim Klein to German photographer Magdalena Kopp and comment by Mansour : "But after having considered the case,- maybe they heard voices like Jeanne d'Arc did, they chose me." An investigative biographical mystery.

"Interactively conversational and demystifying...", 17 August 2014
8/10

Irish writer and documentary director Shane O'Sullivan's documentary feature which he produced, premiered at the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam in 2010, was shot on locations in Japan and Germany and is a UK-Ireland co-production. It tells the story about a German Protestant Christian, journalist and co-founder of a West German underground organization called Red Army Faction (1970-1998) named Ulrike Meinhof (1934-1976), who was born in the interwar period in Oldenburg, Germany and during the German student movement in the late 1960s acquainted two militant activists named Gudrun Ensslin and Andreas Baader.

Distinctly and subtly directed by Irish filmmaker Shane O'Sullivan, this quietly paced documentary which is narrated from multiple viewpoints though mostly from the main interviewees' viewpoints, draws an informative and increasingly reflective portrayal of a Japanese author, guerrilla and founder and leader of a terrorist group called the Japanese Red Army (1971-2001) named Fusako Shigenobu who was born in the year that World War II ended in Tokyo, Japan. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions and reverent cinematography by cinematographers Bassem Fayad, Robin Probyn and Axel Schneppat, this narrative-driven story about radicalization leading to fanaticism and murder of both radicalized freedom fighters and civilians and how the lives of two daughters have been marred by the lives of their respectively militant and renowned mothers, depicts four interrelated studies of character and contains a great and timely score by composer Gilles Packham.

This historically biographical study from the early 2010s which is set in the late 20th and early 21st century in Germany and Japan and where a German daughter and journalist named Bettina Röhl and a Japanese daughter and journalist named May Shigenobu articulates their own and their parents' history with differing views on the political activism of their ancestors and their relation with them, is impelled and reinforced by its fragmented narrative structure, subtle continuity, diverse interviews and cinematic use of archival footage and photographs. An interactively conversational and demystifying documentary feature.

"Densely political, virtuously demystifying...", 17 August 2014
8/10

German screenwriter, producer and director Uli Edel's fifth feature film which he co-wrote with German filmmaker Bern Eichinger, is an adaptation of a book from 1985 by German Journalist Stefan Aust. It premiered in Germany, was shot on locations in Germany, Italy and Morocco and is a Germany-France-Czech Republic co-production which was produced by producer Bernd Eichinger. It tells the story about three children of the Second World War who following the attempted murder of a German student named Rudi Dutschke, the killing of a German student named Benno Ohrnesorg, the execution of Argentine physician and author Che Guevara, the assassination of American pastor and activist Martin Luther King and American attorney and politician Robert F. Kennedy, the escalation of U.S. bombings in Vietnam, the German student movement, the Paris student riots, the Northern Ireland civil rights movements' first civil rights march and the same year as Australian author Germaine Greer published a book about second-wave feminism, founded an organization.

Distinctly and precisely directed by German filmmaker Uli Edel, this finely paced and somewhat fictional tale which is narrated from multiple viewpoints, draws an informative and involving portrayal of a German daughter, mother, sister and author named Ulrike Meinhof, a German daughter, mother, sister and trained elementary school teacher named Gudrun Ensslin and a German son, brother and father named Andreas Baader who met each other in the late 1960s, and who due to their common political views regarding imperialism, neo-fascism and authoritarianism started the first generation of the Baader-Meinhof group. While notable for its versatile milieu depictions, reverent cinematography by cinematographer Rainer Klausmann, production design by production designer Bernd Lepel and costume design by costume designer Birgit Missal, this character-driven and narrative-driven story about the history of terrorism in Germany and dehumanization as a result of ideological extremism which recreates a period in time with counterculture and cold-war when the former leader of the Social Democratic Party of Germany named Willy Brandt (1913-1992) was president of the Federal Republic of Germany, the eugenistic legislation in Sweden regarding compulsory sterilization was formally abolished and French actress Isabelle Carré was born, depicts some abridged studies of character and contains a timely score by composers Peter Hinderthür and Florian Tessloff.

This reflectively conversational, historic and cinematographic reconstruction of real events from the late 2000s which is set mostly in postwar Germany in the late 1960s and 1970s when German students who due to being German citizens were being blamed for the crimes committed by their parents' generation protested against a new emergency legislature in the former capital of West Germany called Bonn and Palestinian leader of the Fatah party Yasser Arafat was elected as chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization, which chronicles the militant activities of the Red Army Faction and where collectivism surpasses individualism and turns into unjustifiable left-wing extremism whilst ones humanity is abandoned for a perceived greater cause, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle character development, rhythmic continuity, abrupt film editing, multiple perspectives, use of archival footage and reverently credible acting performances by German actor Moritz Bleibtreu and German actresses Martina Gedeck and Johanna Wokalek. A densely political, virtuously demystifying and atmospheric narrative feature.

"Cinematically commendable study...", 7 August 2014
8/10

Israeli cinematographer and director Dror Moreh's documentary feature which he co-produced, premiered at the Jerusalem Film Festival in 2012, was shot on locations in Israel and is an Israel-France-Belgium-Germany co-production which was produced by producers Estelle Fialon and Philippe Kowasky. It tells the story about six former heads of the Israeli secret intelligence agency governed by Israel's president called Shin Bet which was founded in the late 1940s, who are assigned to defend their nation against terrorism, espionage and the release of state secrets.

Distinctly and precisely directed by Israeli filmmaker Dror Moreh, this finely paced documentary feature which is narrated interchangeably from the interviewees' viewpoints, draws an exploring and densely informative portrayal of the ongoing Israel-Palestine conflict and of some of the men who were and still is involved in it. While notable for its reverent cinematography by cinematographer Avner Shahat and production design by production designer Doron Koren, this narrative-driven story about foreign policy and contrary ideologies where the significantly educated and experienced men in question elaborate on their role within their private organization, their recruitment of agents, their communication with and interrogation of terrorists who regard them as terrorists, their relation with Palestine and with the Knesset and former presidents and prime ministers, their views on their nation's political history and their tactical methods, becomes a rarely interactive negotiation of power between the interviewees who usually are the interviewers and the interviewer which leads to objective conversations regarding what Palestine has done to Israel and vice-versa, presents a democratic approach which contradicts the anarchistic history it examines and the Israel-Palestine situation and leaves the still crucial questions regarding the possibility of breaking the bloodline of vengeance, of a balance of power, of a lasting armistice and how to communicate humanity were tactics rule, and contains a great and timely instrumental score.

This somewhat philosophical, tangible and sarcastically humorous documentary feature which is set in Israel in the 21st century, which plays on imagination, intimidation and authority, which reflects on the history of Israel and the history of their conflict with Palestine from the Six-Day War in 1967 and where men talk about their highly confidential work for the first time, is impelled and reinforced by its fragmented narrative structure, subtle continuity, reenactments, archival footage, distinct psychological atmosphere and interviews. A cinematically commendable study of history.

"Bravely veracious authentication...", 7 August 2014
8/10

Norwegian author, actress, screenwriter, producer and director Vibeke Løkkeberg's documentary feature which she wrote and which was made in collaboration with the people of Gaza, is inspired by her observations of children's faces on television and her perception about the population being unfairly stigmatized as terrorists. It premiered in the Reel to Reel section at the 35th Toronto International Film Festival in 2010, was shot by citizens of Gaza and is a Norwegian production which was produced by producer Terje Kristiansen. It tells the story about a fourteen-year-old girl named Amira Fat-hi Dawood El Eren, a twelve-year-old boy named Yahya Subh and an eleven-year-old girl named Rasmia Al- Sultan.

Distinctly and subtly directed by Norwegian filmmaker Vibeke Løkkeberg, this quietly paced reportage which is narrated from multiple viewpoints though mostly from the point of view of three Palestinian children, draws a direct and abrupt portrayal of what the situation and conditions were like for the civilians during a war where they became the victims of the battles between terrorist groups and military forces from the state of Israel who declared their independence in 1948, the state of Palestine who declared their independence in 1988 and who both have claimed the Gaza Strip as their territory and Jerusalem as their capital city. While notable for its real milieu depictions and reverent cinematography by cinematographers Yosuf Abu Shreah, Saed Al Sabaa, Mwafag Al Khateeb and Julie Kristensen, this observational story about the people of a former British colony formerly governed by Egypt (1948-1967), Israel (1967-1994) and then under Palestine authority from 1994, an ongoing historical conflict with political and sectarian undertones and a territorial war between the two middle eastern republics and countries of Israel where most of the population are Israeli Jews and Palestine where most of the population are Sunni Muslims and Arab Christians, emphasizes its attention on the children and families, is so subjective that it risks being regarded as populism and contains a timely score by composers Lisa Gerrard and Marcello De Francici.

This recurrently relevant, bilaterally atmospheric and crucially humane documentary feature from the early 2010s which is set in the early 21st century in a city called Gaza in the Levant region during the presidency of Shimon Peres in Israel, Mahmoud Abbas in Palestine and the Gaza War (2008-2009) which resulted in both Palestine and Israel casualties, which lasted for twenty-two days, and where the executioners were praying on the lives of the civilians who were sacrificed for the jurisdiction of an area, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle continuity, multiple perspectives, commendable footage, non-political approach and scenes of the children. A bravely veracious authentication.

Hotell (2013)
"Densely cinematic and harmoniously atmospheric...", 2 August 2014
8/10

Swedish playwright, screenwriter and director Lisa Langseth's second feature film which she wrote, is inspired by personal experiences regarding identity. It premiered in the Contemporary World Cinema section at the 38th Toronto International Film Festival in 2013, was shot on locations in Sweden and is a Sweden-Denmark co-production which was produced by producers Frida Jonason and Patrik Andersson. It tells the story about a mother-to-be named Erika whom after learning how her upcoming birth will affect the health of her and the father-to-be named Oskar's child, begins thinking about becoming someone else.

Distinctly and engagingly directed by Swedish filmmaker Lisa Langseth, this finely paced fictional tale which is narrated from multiple viewpoints though mostly from the main character's point of view, draws a remarkable and heartrending portrayal of Pernilla, Rikard, Ann-Sofi, Peter and Erika who connects after being introduced to each other in a conversation group. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions, reverent cinematography by cinematographer Simon Pramsten and production design by production designer Catharina Nyqvist Ehrnrooth, this character-driven and dialog-driven story about handling pain and how much you can change yourself to become another person without losing yourself by a director whom is sincerely remembered for her commendable directorial debut "Pure" (2010), depicts a gripping and psychological study of character and contains a great and timely score by composers John Berthling and Andreas Söderström.

This appraisingly humorous, humanely reflective and lyrically romantic drama which is set in Gothenburg, Sweden in the 21st century and where newly acquainted members of a conversation group decides to realize their thoughts, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, substantial character development, rhythmic continuity, the emphatic and poignant acting performance by Swedish actress and dancer Alicia Vikander, the sparkling acting performance by Swedish actress and musician Mira Eklund and the noteworthy acting performance by Swedish stage and film actress Maria Bjerkerud. A densely cinematic and harmoniously atmospheric narrative feature.

Resan (1987)
"Eternally waving white flag...", 30 July 2014
9/10

English screenwriter, film editor and director Peter Watkins' documentary feature which he wrote and produced, consist of interviews from 1983-1986 with families from nations like Japan, the United States, France, former Soviet Union, former West-Germany, Scotland, Mexico, Tahiti, Australia and Norway regarding their knowledge, feelings and given information from television, their governments and the school systems in their countries about the militarization of the planet. It premiered at the 41st Edinburgh International Film Festival in 1987, was shot on locations in five continents and is a Sweden-Denmark-Norway- Scotland-Canada-USA-Mexico-Australia-West Germany-Soviet Union-France- Polynesia-Mozambique-Japan co-production. It tells the story about photographs of nuclear weapons and of people from Nagasaki and Hiroshima in Japan who in the early 1940s during the Second World War (1939-1945) became the human targets of these weapons after the constitutional monarchy called the Empire of Japan (1868-1947) committed a war crime against the United States which was retaliated one month before the end of World War II, and how African, Asian, Australian, North American and European adults, students and children in the 1980s responded to seeing photographs of victims of the atomic bomb.

Distinctly and precisely directed by English auteur filmmaker Peter Watkins, this finely paced historical testimony which is translated by Canadian translators Erna Bafe and Margarita Stoker and narrated by the director, American photographer Bob Deltegreti and from many interactive, coherent and reflective viewpoints, draws a topographic, socio-political and questioning portrayal of prioritization of nuclear weapon reinforcements over the living conditions of common people. While notable for its versatile milieu depictions, reverent cinematography by the many cinematographers from the many countries where this documentary was made, many interviewers and distinguishable use of light, this narrative-driven and monologue-driven fourteen hour and thirty minutes story about state autocracy promoted to the people as democracy and thereby instigating anarchy, colonization, international relations, political imitation, intercultural communication, world arms trade in direct connection with human suffering and increased death rates, how bigotry, unconditional nationalism and hostility between nations is created through premeditated disinformation, how neutrality have been favored over innate human feelings in education, conservation of a heat and electricity resource which as artillery has the potential of annihilating the whole world and five characters in the alphabet forming one of the most substantial words ever thought of, exists between ideas, realities, motions and acts.

Released the same year as the first Palestinian uprising called the intifada took place at the Gaza Strip, the year before German-French- American filmmaker Marcel Ophüls' "Hôtel Terminus: The Life and Times of Klaus Barbie" (1988), the year after Norwegian physician and politician Gro Harlem Brundtland became prime minister of Norway for the second time, two years before the Fall of the Berlin Wall (1961-1989), two years after Russian filmmaker Elem Klimov's "Come and See" (1985), three years before Appenzell Innerrhoden became the last canton of Switzerland to introduce women's suffrage and three years after the Algerian Family Code was enacted, this platform for the invaluable voices of ordinary people which informs on the immense military and nuclear reinforcements of the United Stated and Russia in the event of an upcoming war in Europe and disarms the strategic methods used in the nineteen-eighties by reigning governments and the mass media to conceal factual information from them and silence their civil right to protest against decreed restrictions which increased state power and civil adversity, contains a naturally occurring and rarely intangible though perceptible score with a performance by an aspiring pianist named Yoriko Shinjo of one of her own compositions called "Snow".

This authoritatively educational, monumental in scale and congenially conversational and atmospheric study of ideological systems from the late 20th century which is set in the mid-1980s during the Cold War (1946-1991) and which surpasses moral indignation, is impelled and reinforced by its fragmented narrative structure, subtle continuity, use of television monitors, interchangeably subjective and objective depiction of its central themes, enactments of nuclear attacks by volunteering citizens, public discussions, comment by an American daughter: "Dear Mr. President. I think there should not be a war. I think there should not be nuclear bombs.", by a Scottish activist: "The moment you try to question a decision or an idea then you are automatically a traitor to the whole country you live in." and by a Norwegian mother, wife and teacher named Ragnveig Vikan: "I think it is the governing powers' duty to provide the teachers with proper information and make everything that has to do with disarmament an own subject in schools. Call it peace education." An eternally waving white flag and a venerable instrument to the future of the planet and humanity.


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