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SindreKaspersen

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"...concentrated...", 25 August 2015
8/10

French screenwriter and director Cédric Anger's third feature film which he wrote, is inspired by real events which took place in l'Oise, Picardie in France in the late 1970 and an adaptation of a novel from 2001 by a French journalist and author named Yvan Stefanovitch and a French journalist named Martine Laroche-Joubert. It premiered in France, was shot on locations in France and is a French production which was produced by producers Alain Attal and Anne Rapczyk. It tells the story about a police officer.

Distinctly and subtly directed by French filmmaker Cédric Anger, this quietly paced and somewhat fictional tale which is narrated mostly from the protagonist's point of view, draws a psychologically reflective portrayal of a twenty-two-year-old son whom whilst in the midst of a murder investigation befriends a person named Sophie. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions and reverent cinematography by cinematographer Thomas Hardmeier, this character- driven story about French police history which was made more than a century after a French thinker with the birth name Marie Gouze wrote: "Women, wake up; the tocsin of reason sounds throughout the universe, recognize your rights." a social club called Amis de la Verité or Society of the Friends of Truth was introduced in France, legal equality was ascribed to the Jewish people of France, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland passed the Roman Catholic Relief Act 1829, English 19th century evolutionary biologists named Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) and Charles Robert Darwin (1809-1882) published a joint presentation called "On the Tendency of Spices to form Varieties; and on the Perpetuation of Varieties and Spices by Natural Means of Selection." (1858), a French journalist named Julie Victoire Daubiè (1824-1874) graduated from a French University and women were permitted to obtain medical degrees, an English writer named Mary Corinna Putnam Jacobi (1842- 1906) was admitted as a student in the Faculty of Medicine department at the Sorbonne (1150-1970) and a Scottish advocate for women's education named Mary Maclean Crudelius (1839-1877) and a Commander of the Order of the British Empire named Dame Sarah Elizabeth Siddons Mair (1846-1941) founded Edinburgh Association for the Education of Women (1867-1892), depicts a cinematically literary study of character.

Made more than a century after an English theorist with the initials J.S.M. wrote: "I find it presumption in anyone to pretend to decide what women are or are not, can or cannot be, by natural constitution." an English teacher named Sarah Emily Davis (1830- 1921) became Mistress of Girton College, Cambridge University in England, a French physician named Madeleine Près (1839-1925) attained a doctorate in medicine, an English doctor of medicine named Elizabeth Garrett Anderson (1836- 1917) opened her own practice in London, England, achieved a medical degree at the University of Paris and was elected as Major in England, an English anthropologist named Sir Francis Galton (1822-1911) communicated a term called Eugenics which legitimized the exercise of infanticide, a German author from Königsberg, Prussia named Henriette Arendt (1874-1922) became a police officer, an English sociologist mentioned a term called Meritocracy, a civil law enforcement agency which was founded in the early 19th century by a French police officer named Eugène François Vidocq (1775-1857) changed its name to National Police, an autonomous public institution in France called University Paris VIII was founded, women were allowed admittance at a public institution of higher education and research in the commune of Palaiseau in Paris, France called École Polytechnique, an American magazine wrote about a term called Rankism, a twenty-five-year-old French Commandant named Caroline Aigle (1974-2007) became a fighter pilot in the French Air Force and an American singer with the surname Merchant sang her lyrics: "Doctors have come from distant cities just to see me - - stand over my bed disbelieving what they're seeing - - they say I …" contains a great and timely score by composer Grégoire Hetzel.

This momentarily humane and grave retelling which is set in France in the late 20th century and where a French man of the law named Alain Lamare is completely preoccupied with gaining a promotion and daughters are disappearing one by one, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle character development, rhythmic continuity, scenes with Sophie, the reverent acting performance by French actor, screenwriter and director Guillaume Canet and the efficiently understated acting performance by French actress Ana Girardot. A darkly concentrated narrative feature.

"...open-minded...", 15 August 2015
8/10

French actress, screenwriter and director Lucie Borleteau's feature film debut which she wrote with screenwriter Clara Bourreau, is inspired by her best friend who was a sailor. It premiered in France, was screened in the Concorso internazionale section at the 67th Locarno international Film Festival in 2014, was shot on locations in France, Poland and Senegal and is a French production which was produced by producers Pascal Caucheteux and Marine Arrighi de Casanova. It tells the story about a thirty-year-old daughter, sister and mechanic at a cargo ship called Fidelio.

Distinctly and subtly directed by French filmmaker Lucie Borleteau, this quietly paced fictional tale which is narrated mostly from the protagonist's point of view, draws a reflectively multifaceted and literary portrayal of a Norwegian citizen named Felix whom has left his country of origin to become an author and his relationship with his girlfriend. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions, distinct cinematography by cinematographer Simon Beauflis and real locations, this character-driven and narrative-driven story about parallel lives, a human being who moves like the character which carries the boat where she temporarily lives, the others whom she is accompanied by and a word starting with l and ending with e, depicts a cinematographically poetic study of character and contains a great and timely score by composer Thomas de Pourquery.

This mindfully interrelated journey which is set in France in the 21st century and where a captain named Gaël is reunited with a former friend, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure,substantial character development, rhythmic continuity, comment by Alice: "I'll never be an ordinary girl." and the reverent acting performances by Greek actress Ariane Labed and French actor, musician and director Melvil Poupaud. A presently open-minded and mysterious narrative feature which gained, among other awards, the Best Actress Award at the 67th Locarno Film Festival in 2014.

"...venerable...", 13 August 2015
8/10

English screenwriter, producer and director James Kent's feature film debut which was written by Iranian-English screenwriter Juliette Towhidi, is an adaptation of a memoir from 1933 by an English 19th and 20th century author, lecturer, nurse and journalist named Vera Mary Brittain (1893-1970). It premiered in England, was shot on locations in England and is a UK production which was produced by producers Rosie Alison and David Heyman. It tells the story about a daughter, sister and literature student at Somerville College in Oxford, England who was raised with her brother named Edward Brittain in Macclesfield, Cheshire in England by her mother named Edith Bervon Brittain (1868-1948) and her father named Thomas Arthur Brittain (1864-1935), who as an adolescent eleven-year-old moved to Buxton, Derbyshire in England, as a thirteen-year-old attended a boarding school in Kingswood, Surrey in England called St. Monica's. and in 1913 met an other named Roland Leighton.

Distinctly and subtly directed by English filmmaker James Kent, this quietly paced and somewhat fictional tale which is narrated through letters and mostly from the main character's point of view, draws a biographically abridged portrayal of an English citizen whom whilst in her early twenties during the First World War (1914-1918) went to a commune in Pas-de-Calais called Étaples in France to work as a Voluntary Aid Detachment nurse where she saved the lives of English and German soldiers and who as a twenty-six-year-old at the University of Oxford acquainted an English author named Winifred Holtby (1898-1935). While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions, distinct cinematography by cinematographer Rob Hardy, production design by production designer Jon Henson and costume design by costume designer Consolata Boyle, this character-driven and narrative-driven story about loss, patriotic idealism, psychological trauma and something an international organization which was founded in Geneva, Switzerland in 1920 called the League of Nations (1920-1946) advocated for and an 18th century philosopher from Königsberg, Prussia who came from a Pietistic Christian family wrote about in an essay called "Zum ewigen Frieden." Or "Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch." (1795), was made one hundred and eighty-nine years after an Irish philosopher named William Thompson (1775-1833) wrote in a book he had written with an 18th and 19th century English-Irish author and translator named Anna Doyle Wheeler (1780-1848) called "Appeal of One Half of the Human Race, Women, Against the Pretensions of the other Half, Men, to retain them in Political and thence in Civil and Domestic Slavery." (1825): "… In this sense only, though their relative situation were as abject as that of cats, may the interests of adult daughters be said to be involved in the interests of their masters, their fathers.", "… As to the pleasures of the senses. So notoriously are wives and all women restrained, that equal enjoyment of these pleasures with men, particularly eating and drinking, is esteemed as immoral in them, while to men it is freely permitted.", "…limited women to one right; a supposed identity." and "As your bondage has chained down man to the ignorance and vices of despotism, so will your liberation reward him with knowledge, with freedom and with …", one hundred and fifty years after the Contagious Diseases Acts was adopted in England, eight years after an English singer named Sue Gilmurray sang her lyrics: "… yet she took up her life and she took up her pen and she wrote and she spoke and she argued and pleaded – calling men to have done men to have done with the battlefield…", six years after an Irish singer sang her lyrics: "…such innocent eyes - - Then they stole your brother's life - - came home murdered peace of mind." and one year before English actresses Kate Winslet, Emma Thompson, Emily Blunt and American actresses Laura Linney, Anne Hathaway and Ashley Judd wrote a letter to an organization which was founded in London, England in 1961, the same year as an English author named Adela Constantia Mary Pankhurst Walsh (1885-1961), by an English-Jewish lawyer named Peter Benenson (1921-2005), contains a great and timely score by composer Max Richter.

This reflectively literary and gracefully humane narrative feature and elegy which is set in England and France in the early 20th century and where a person who dreamt of becoming a writer and was born in Newcastle-under-Lyme in Staffordshire, England in the early 1890s into the Victorian Era (1837-1901) three hundred and thirty-four years after an instrument of punishment called Scold's Bridle was first used on women in Scotland, seventy-seven years after a badge called black triangle was used to divide human beings into social divisions in concentration camps and thirty-eight years before Women's Suffrage was adopted in England, authored her personal experiences and surpassed herself, is impelled and reinforced by its fragmented narrative structure, substantial character development, rhythmic continuity, majestic cinematographic silence, comment by Vera Brittain: "…Thank goodness I have someone I can confide in." and the tailor-made acting performance by Swedish actress Alicia Vikander. A venerable remembrance.

24 Days (2014)
"...testamentary...", 9 August 2015
8/10

French screenwriter, producer and director Alexandre Arcady's seventeenth feature film which he produced and wrote with French screenwriters Antoine Lacomblez and Emilie Frèche, is an adaptation of a book from 2009 by Ruth Halimi and French author and screenwriter Emilie Frèche. It premiered in France, was shot on locations in France and is a French production. It tells the story about a mother named Ruth, a father named Didier Halimi and their son named Ilan Halimi.

Distinctly and precisely directed by French filmmaker Alexandre Arcady, this quietly paced and somewhat fictional tale which is narrated interchangeably from multiple viewpoints, draws an immediately present and reflectively informative portrayal of a French police case from the late 2000s where a French-Jewish citizen and brother was kidnapped and held hostage for ransom. While notable for its versatile and atmospheric milieu depictions, distinct cinematography by cinematographer Gilles Henry, production design by production designer Tony Egry and costume design by costume designer Éric Perron, this narrative-driven and dialog-driven story about French police history and anti-Semitism which is inspired by real events which took place in Paris, France in 2006, contains a great and timely score by composer Armand Amar.

This authoritatively concentrated retelling which is set in France in the 21st century and where a twenty-three-year-old human being of Moroccan origins who was taken against his will is the communicator, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle character development, rhythmic continuity, comment by Ruth Halimi: "If my son was not Jewish, he would not be…" and the reverent acting performance by French actress, screenwriter and director Zabou Breitman. A testamentary narrative feature.

Maidan (2014)
"Considerately recorded...", 3 August 2015
8/10

Ukrainian film editor, cinematographer and documentary filmmaker Sergei Loznitsa's documentary feature which he co-produced, is inspired by real events which took place in Kiev, Ukraine in 2013- 2014. It premiered in the Out of competition Special Screenings section at the 67th Cannes International Film Festival in 2014, was shot on locations in Ukraine and is a Ukraine-The Netherlands co- production which was produced by producer Maria Choustova-Baker. It tells the story about ninety days of autonomous revolution against lawlessness in the state of Ukraine.

Distinctly and subtly directed by Ukrainian filmmaker Sergei Loznitsa, this quietly paced documentary which is narrated from multiple viewpoints, draws a communicatively informative portrayal of Ukrainian citizens whom after learning that their president didn't sign an Association Agreement with Europe in Vilnius, Lithuania, occupied Independence Square and founded an anti-criminal movement aiming to establish justice and rule of law. While notable for its distinctly atmospheric milieu depictions and reverent cinematography by cinematographers Sergei Loznitsa, Serhiy Stetsenko and Mykhailo Yelchev, this narrative-driven story reflects upon the identity of a nation, a ten letter word starting with s and ending with y and a seven letter word starting with d and ending with y which is integrated in the voices of the people and the reflective frames of the filmmaker.

This presently historic authentication which is set in Ukraine in the 21st century and where girls, boys, women and men reclaim what is lawfully for them to reclaim, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle continuity, the words of a Ukrainian actress named Aga Rogovtseva and the comment by a human being working for a little bit of common decency for her Cossack nation: "I've come straight from the barricades, you see." A considerately recorded and regarded documentary feature.

Leviathan (2014)
"Cinematographically venerating...", 29 July 2015
8/10

Russian screenwriter and director Andrei Zvyagintsev's fourth feature film which he wrote with screenwriter Oleg Negin, is inspired by real events, theological tales and a novel called "Michael Kohlhaas" (1810) by a German 18th and 19th century poet named Heinrich von Kleist. It premiered In competition at the 67th Cannes International Film Festival in 2014, was screened in the Masters section at the 39th Toronto International Film Festival in 2014, was shot on locations in Russia and is a Russian production which was produced by producer Alexander Rodnyansky. It tells the story about a student named Roma who lives in a cottage by the coast with his father named Nikolaj and his stepmother named Lilja who are thinking about finding themselves a new place to live.

Distinctly and masterfully directed by Russian filmmaker Andrei Zvyagintsev, this quietly paced fictional tale which is narrated interchangeably from multiple viewpoints, draws a silently reflective and global portrayal of a state whom is expropriating an ordinary man's property for the sake of building a communication center, a mayor named Vadim whom is making arrangements to become re-elected and a wife whom is struggling to make friends with her stepson. While notable for its versatile and atmospheric milieu depictions, majestic cinematography by cinematographer Mikail Krichman and production design by production designer Andrej Ponkratov, this narrative-driven and dialog-driven story about Russian culture and the invaluable importance of a ruling authority where a filmmaker has written his main character into a deadlock, depicts multiple interrelated studies of character and contains a great and timely score by composer Philip Glass.

This poetically perspicacious, naturally humorous and ingrained character piece which is set in Russia in the 21st century, which goes further than the precisely realized frames and where an attorney named Dimitri from Moscow, Russia is advocating for the rights of his friend who thinks his land is being unjustly confiscated by the authorities, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, substantial character development, rhythmic continuity, characteristically distinct style of filmmaking, comment by Nikolaj: "… her. She is a good human being." and the reverent acting performances by Russian stage and film actor Aleksei Serebryakov and Russian actress Elena Lyadova. A cinematographically venerating narrative feature which gained, among other awards, the award for Best Screenplay and the 67th Cannes Film Festival in 2014.

2 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
"Radically humane...", 26 July 2015
8/10

Danish screenwriter, producer and director Susanne Bier's fourteenth feature film which she co-wrote with Danish screenwriter and director Anders Thomas Jensen after their story, premiered in the Special Presentations section at the 39th Toronto International Film Festival in 2014, was screened in the Official Selection section at the 62nd San Sebastián International Film Festival in 2014, was shot on locations in Denmark and is a Denmark-Sweden co-production which was produced by producer Sisse Graum Jørgensen. It tells the story about a police officer named Andreas Juhl.

Distinctly and subtly directed by Danish filmmaker Susanne Bier, this quietly paced fictional tale which is narrated interchangeably from the main characters' viewpoints, draws an immediately gripping portrayal of a police case and the parallel lives of those involved. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions and reverent cinematography by cinematographer Michael Keith Snyman, this character-driven and narrative-driven story about Scandinavian values and conventional views on fatherhood and motherhood, depicts multiple perspicacious studies of character and contains a great and timely score by composer Johan Söderqvist.

This dramatically realistic and increasingly heartrending character piece which is set in Denmark in the 21st century and where trauma instigates heartfelt actions which surpasses moral boundaries and a father and husband is brutally confronted with circumstantial events which provokes intuitive reactions, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, substantial character development, rhythmic continuity, self-explanatory scenes of a human being named Sofus and the invaluable acting performances by Danish actors Nikolaj Coaster-Waldau, Nikolaj Lie Kaas and Norwegian actress Maria Bonnevie. A radically humane narrative feature.

"Compassionately reconciling...", 25 July 2015
8/10

Norwegian actress, author, Doctor of Humane Letters, screenwriter and director Liv Ullmann's television film which was written by a Swedish 20th and 21st century son, brother, husband and father named Ernst Ingmar Bergman, is an adaptation of an autobiographical book he wrote in 1994. It premiered on Swedish television in 1996, was shot on locations in Sweden and is a Sweden-Norway-Denmark-Finland-Iceland co-production which was produced by producer Ingrid Dahlberg. It tells the story about a sixteen-year-old daughter and sister named Anna Bergman who autonomously, within her own independent and inviolable mind, has concluded that if she conventionally and without any consideration for her personal thoughts goes through with her Protestant Christian communion as is commonly expected, it would for her be like playing theatre.

Distinctly and precisely directed by Norwegian filmmaker Liv Ullmann, this quietly paced and somewhat fictional tale which is narrated interchangeably from the main characters' viewpoints, draws an introspectively self-knowledgeable and conversationally concentrated portrayal of a worshipped thirty-six-year-old mother, wife and nurse whom has befriended a student named Tomas Egerman and whom is considering if she should stay married to her husband named Henrik or get a divorce. While notable for its versatile and atmospheric milieu depictions, distinct cinematography by cinematographer Sven Nykvist, production design by production designer Mette Möller, costume design by costume designer Inger Pehrsson and prominent use of theological terminology, this narrative-driven and dialog-driven story about human relations and inner lives where a five letter word starting with t and ending with h is present in every frame and a five letter word starting with A and ending with e is timelessly ingrained, depicts a self-examining study of character and contains a great and timely instrumental score by Norwegian violinist Arve Tellefsen.

This compassionately reconciling three hour and seven minutes companion piece from the late 1990s which is set in Sweden in the early 20th century and where a filmmaker's relationship with his parents and views of them is further and possibly therapeutically examined through the direction of a close collaborator and theatre and film actress and instructor, and a human being plans to get her spouse declared ill and claims that he his mentally sick to get him hospitalized so that she can stand free of …, is impelled and reinforced by its fragmented narrative structure, substantial character development, rhythmic continuity, psychological flashback scenes and the communicatively understated acting performances by Swedish actress Pernilla August and Swedish actor Max von Sydow. An internalized character piece.

Girlhood (2014)
2 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
"Cinematically surpassing...", 14 July 2015
8/10

French screenwriter and director Céline Sciamma's third feature film which she wrote, is vocally communicated by non-actors. It premiered in the Directors' Fortnight section at the 67th Cannes International Film Festival in 2014, was screened in the Contemporary World Cinema section at the 39th Toronto International Film Festival in 2014, was shot on locations in France and is a French production which was produced by producer Bénédicte Couvreur. It tells the story about a group of adolescent girls who lives in the suburbs of Paris, France.

Distinctly and precisely directed by French filmmaker Céline Sciamma, this quietly paced fictional tale which is narrated mostly from the main character's point of view, draws a distinguishably perspicacious portrayal of a sixteen-year-old sister whom is searching for an education. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions and distinct cinematography by cinematographer Crystel Fournier, this character-driven and narrative-driven story about French youth and ingenious female empowerment which is characterized by the signature of a professional filmmaker, depicts a perceptibly present study of character and contains a great and timely score by composer Jean-Babtiste Laubier.

This authoritatively authentic fictionalization of real life which is set in France in the 21st century and where a human being is introduced to a ten letter word starting with the character f, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, substantial character development, rhythmic continuity, acutely realized frames and the reverent acting performances by Karidja Touré and Assa Sylla. A cinematically surpassing narrative feature which gained, among other awards, the Bronze Horse for Best Film at the 25th Stockholm International Film Festival in 2014.

1 out of 5 people found the following review useful:
"Reasonably understated and introductory...", 27 May 2015
8/10

Swiss cinematographer and documentary director Alain Margot's documentary feature which he wrote, premiered in Switzerland, was screened in the Documania section at the 25th Stockholm International Film Festival in 2014, was shot on locations in Ukraine, Russia and France and is a Swiss production which was produced by producer Caroline Velan. It tells the story about a twenty-eight-year-old person from a provincial town called Khmelnytskyi, Ukraine and her transition from painting to revolutionary protest.

Distinctly and subtly directed by Swiss filmmaker Alain Margot, this quietly paced documentary which is narrated by the main interviewee and from multiple viewpoints, draws an unsensational portrayal of real events. While notable for its versatile and atmospheric milieu depictions, this narrative-driven story about provocative sextremism and opposition against dictatorial hegemony, religious privilege and the unjustifiable genocide of women, was made more than two centuries after an 18th century French thinker and mathematician named Nicolas de Condorcet (1743-1794) published a writing called For the Admission to the Right of Citizenship for Women, two hundred and thirty-eight years after the United States Declaration of Independence (1776) was adopted, two hundred and ten years after the birth of a French novelist named Georgette Amandine Aurore Lucile Dudevant Dupin Sand (1804-1876), one hundred and eighty-four years after a French engraver named Ferdinand Victor Eugène Delacroix (1798-1863) made a painting called Liberty Leading the People (1830) where the name Marianne is of significance, one hundred and fifty-five years after A Swedish free-mason named Carin Sophie Leijonhufvud Adlersparre (1823-1895) and a Swedish novelist named Rosalie Ulrika Olivecrona (1823-1898) founded a women's journal which was inspired by a 19th century novel written by a Swedish woman of letters named Fredrika Bremer (1801-1865), one hundred and forty-four years after a French author named Marie Adélaïde Deraismes (1828-1894) founded the Association for the Rights of Women with a French author named Léon Richer (1824-1911) and an American leader named Victoria Claflin Woodhull (1838-1927) and her sister named Tennesse Celeste Claflin (1844-1923) became stockbrokers, one hundred and forty-three years after a Danish historian named Georg Morris Cohen Brandes (1842-1927) translated a book by an English philosopher and political theorist named John Stuart Mill (1806-1873) called "The Subjection of Woman" (1869) into the Danish language, one hundred and thirty-three years after a French advocate for women's rights named Hubertine Auclert (1848-1914) created a journal called The Citizeness (1881-1891), one hundred and thirty-one years after New Zealand became the first country to adopt Women's Suffrage, a Norwegian student named Ida Cecilie Thoresen Krog (1858-1911) initiated a discussion club called Skuld or gazing into the future in Norway and an organization called the Fabian Society was founded in London, England and one hundred and twenty-seven years after the first journal in Norway representing the cause of women called Nylænde or New Terrain was published and its then editor was a Norwegian journalist and teacher named Gina Jørgine Anna Sverdrup Krog (1847-1916).

Released one hundred and twenty-six years after a French journalist named Eliska Girrard Vincent (1841-1914) introduced a journal called L'Egalité or Equality, one hundred and twenty-five years after a Norwegian teacher named Ragna Vilhelmine Ullmann Nielsen (1854-1938) started the first public school in Christiania, Norway, one hundred and seventeen years after a women's union which was led by an English social reformer and Suffragist named Dame Millicent Garrett Fawcett (1847-1929) called the National Union for Women's Suffrage Societies (1897-1917) was established and a French journalist named Marguerite Charlotte Durand (1864-1936) founded a daily newspaper called Le Fronde or The Critic (1897-1903), one hundred and eleven years after an English author and Suffragette named Emmeline Pankhurst (1859-1928) founded the Women's Social and Political Union (1903-1917) with her daughters named Christabel Harriette Pankhurst (1880-1958) and Estelle Sylvia Pankhurst (1882-1960), one hundred and one years after a French actress named Sarah Rosine Bernhardt (1844-1923) witnessed a Ukrainian ballet dancer named Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950) in a ballet called "Petrushka" (1911) and said: "I'm afraid, I'm afraid, for I am watching the world's greatest actor.", ninety-four years after a Norwegian writer named Fernanda Petra Gregorine Thomesen Nissen (1863-1920), sixty-four years after a term called McCarthyism became known in the United States and a blacklist called Red Channels was published, fifty-nine years after an American organizer named Rosa Parks (1913- 2005) walked into a bus and remained in her seat, thirty-three years after a French writer named Yvette Roudy became the first minister of women's rights in France, four years after a Ukrainian human being and former journalist realized that in her country she could talk about freedom of speech, but not exercise it, two years after a person named Şafak Pavey who as a nineteen-year-old in the late 1990s in Zürich, Switzerland performed a humanely surpassing act, became a member of the Turkish government, one year after an English daughter, sister and journalist named Caroline Criado-Perez's appeal to the British government concerning the representation of women in British media and the lack of women on British banknotes was recognized by the Bank of England, the same year as a twenty-two-year-old Egyptian citizen named Aliaa Magda Elmahdy made a publication and one year before the people of Ireland voted in favor of the legalization of same-sex marriage, this somewhat biographical and irreverent though substantial work where freedom of expression is unrestrictedly used regardless of its apparent consequences, contains a great and timely score by composer Cristina Yakovleva.

This retelling of propagandist events which is set in Ukraine, Russia and France in the 21st century and where the emphasis is on an painter who in 2008 founded a now seven-year-old international women's movement with her friends from Ukraine named Anna Hutsol and Alexandra Shevchenko, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, subtle continuity, self-explanatory archival footage and comment: "Ukraine is not a brothel." A reasonably understated and introductory documentary feature.


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