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"...existing...", 5 June 2016
8/10

Northern Irish producer and television and film director Declan Lawn's documentary which he produced, is inspired by real events. It premiered on BBC Northern Ireland, was shot on locations in Northern Ireland and is a UK production. It tells the story about the Catholic and Protestant community in Ardoyne (1816), North Belfast, Northern Ireland where building of bonfires and the Tour of the North Parade takes place annually.

Distinctly and subtly directed by Northern Irish filmmaker Declan Lawn, this quietly paced documentary which is narrated and presented by an Irish journalist from the Cathedral Town, County Donegal where Irish people once crossed the Bridge of Tears named Alys Harte and from multiple viewpoints, draws an immediate portrayal of concerned Catholic students and the Orangemen's Day which celebrates Her Most Excellent Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, something that happened four centuries ago in a client state named the Kingdom of Ireland (1542-1800) and thirty-one years ago at Aberdeen Street in Belfast (1921). While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions and cinematography by cinematographer Séamus McCracken, this dialog-driven story about Irish cross-cultural communication, was made eight centuries after a term named Blessen (1225), the Parliament of Ireland (1297-1800), four centuries after the Plantation of Ulster (1606), Place Royale or Place des Vosges (1612) in Paris, France and the sixteenth pregnancy (1638) of an English woman minister forenamed Anne who claimed the authority of inspiration, three centuries after a life named the Golden Eagle was described (1758) by a son of Sweden, seven men were appointed to the Board of Deputies of British Jews (1760), the Presentation Sisters (1775) in Cork by an Irish educator named Honora Nano Nagle (1718-1784), the Water Frame (1769), an American surveyor from Cornwall (1740) named Ira Allen (1754-1814) became a member of the Green Mountain Boys (1774), an Englishwoman was a governess for the three daughters of an Irish heiress and Countess of Kingston named Caroline King (1754-1823) and an Irish MP named Robert King (1754-1799) in Mitchelstown, Ireland (1786-1787), The Custom House (1791), a musical instrument named Siren (late 1700s) by a Scotsman, two centuries after The Tower (1805) at Banba's Crown in a headland named Malin Head, a British musician and poet named Helen Selina Sheridan (1807-1867) who as her sisters named Caroline and Georgiana was one of the Three Graces, who visited the Cape of Good Hope (1817) and resided in a grace and favour apartment, moved to Florence (1825), a street in West Belfast was named Shankhill Road (1831), a twenty-eight-year-old American Lowell Mill Girl and Yankee woman named Sarah George Bagley (1806-1883) was at the Hamilton Manufacturing Company (1825-1929), Seven Sisters Road (1833), the Voice of Industry (1843-1848), a woman named Sarah Maria Louisa Kirwan reached Ireland's Eye (1852), Curragh Camp (1855) in County Kildare (1111), the Kensington Society (1865-1868) created a Women's Suffrage Petition (1866), "Proserpine" (1874), Adelaide railway station (1897), a decree named Ne Temere (1907-1970) was issued and the Actressesˈ Franchise League (1908-1934).

Made a century after an Irish nurse from Liverpool named Delia Larkin (1878-1949) became General Secretary of the Irish Women Workersˈ Union (1911), less than a century after an English author from Rock Ferry forenamed Mary was a member of the Women Writers Suffrage League (1908-1919), France regained (1918) the Imperial Territory of Alsace-Lorraine (1871), a road bridge named Queen Maeve Bridge (1923), the Curzon Cinemas (1934), the Battle of Cable Street (1936), the Irish Parliament (1937), a state named the Kingdom of Italy (1861-1946), Virginia Vocational School (1954), the National Youth Theatre (1956) in Holloway, an Irishwoman forenamed Mary became a Guardian of the Peace (1959), the Divis Tower (1966), Ulster University (1968), the Representation of the People Act (1969) in the UK granted eighteen-year-olds the right to vote and a song inspired by an 18th century poem named "Women of Ireland" (1969), Her Royal Highness named Katharine Lucy Mary Worsley opened the Northern College of Music Manchester (1973), an American actress humanized a human being who had sixteen personalities (1976), the West of Scotland Band Alliance (1979), Lagan College (1981), an English MP named Josephine Richardson (1923-1994) was appointed Shadow Minister for Women and Equality (1983) and the Hyde Park Holocaust Memorial (1983), the Fair Employment Act (1989) was granted Royal Assent, seven Scotswomen created Harpies and Quines (1992-1994) in Glasgow, Scotland, a British Member of the Northern Ireland Forum (1996) from East Belfast named Pearl Sagar started the NI Women's Coalition (1996-2006), articles in the Nineteenth Amendment of the Constitution of Ireland was modified (1998) according to the principle of consent and the Parades Commission (1998), the Police Service of Northern Ireland (2001), the Ruth Catholic children dispute (2001-2002), an Irishwoman named Clare O'Leary reached (2004) a mountain which was named by a Welsh surveyor in 1865, the Belfast City Hall Flag Protests (2012) and an English Right Honourable middle named Mary and surnamed May introduced the Protection of Freedoms Act (2012), an Act of the Oireachtas (1937) named the Protection of Life During Pregnancy Act 2013 and before a Northern Irish Member of the Legislative Assembly from South Belfast named Claire Hanna initiated the first Living Wage council in Ireland (2014), a Northern Irish mother and Senator in the Senate of Ireland (1937) named Máiria Cahill was presented with the James Larkin Thirst for Justice Award (2015), an Irish Tánaiste named Frances Fitzgerald was appointed (2016) Minister for Justice and Equality (1919) and a Celtic Woman from Londonderry (1662) forenamed Máireád sang: " peaceful like an angel " (2016).

This observant testimony which is set in Ireland in the 21st century and where communities are protected by peace walls, the sentences "KAT" and KAH" are written, the interviewer attains permission to walk with the interviewees as they march towards the flashpoint, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, rhythmic continuity and comment by the guest: "It's very British. There's flags flying everywhere. An existing documentary.

"...national...", 1 May 2016
8/10

Scottish producer and director Jane McWilliams' television series, is inspired by real events. It premiered on BBC One Scotland, was shot on locations in Scotland, England and France and is a UK production which was produced by producer Richard Downes. It tells the story about a people named the Picts, the Gaels, the Britons and the Angles and a self-governing country called Caledonia and Pictland where a river is named River Tyne and a volcano is surnamed Kilda.

Distinctly and subtly directed by Scottish filmmaker Jane McWilliams, this quietly paced documentary which is narrated and presented by Scottish archaeologist Neil Oliver and from multiple viewpoints, draws a cinematographic portrayal of thirty-two council areas, two topographic regions and three distinct areas. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions and distinct cinematography by cinematographer Neville Kidd, this narrative-driven story about historical perspectives was made a millennium after an Island named Iona (563), the House of Alpin (843-1040) and the House of France (987-1328), nine centuries after a Scottish guidwife named Gruoch Ingen Boite (c. 1020-1054) became Queen of Alba (1040) and Dunbar Castle (c. 1070-1567) in East Lothian, the Scottish Lowlands, eight centuries after Dunnottar Castle (1200s) in Stonehaven, Aberdeenshire, Scotland where a green lady ... , the English-Scottish border (1237), the Treaty of Newcastle (1244) was sealed by a future marriage arrangement, the Isle of Man (1266), a hymn with the lyrics "From you a light arises by which glorious … is observed." was sung (1281) during a wedding (1070), an English Princess named Joan of Acre (1272-1307) was born the seventh child, a Guardian and son of Scotland named Robert I, King of Scots (1274- 1329), a two-year-old daughter of Norway became Queen of Scots (1288), the Battle at Stirling Bridge (1297), eight centuries after a Scottish University (1410-1413), seven centuries after the Declaration of Abroath (1320), the Battle of Roslin (1303), William's renaissance (1305) and the House of Stuart (1371-1807), six centuries after the birth of Joan Stewart, Countess of Morton (1428-1437), a Scottish Lord of the Isles named James IV of Scotland (1473-1513) journeyed to the Isle of May with a ship named the Lion (1506), the Court of Session (1532), the College of Justice (1532), the Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542, a treatise from (1532) by a person from the Republic of Florence (1115-1532) was placed on Index Libronim Prohibitorum (1559), a Scot named James VI and I (1566-1625) was born in Edinburgh Castle at Castle Rock, Scotland, a Scotswoman who traveled with the Queen's Ferry (1567) to Loch Leven Castle in the Scottish Highlands, wore a white gown in Paris, France (1559), Anne of Denmark (1574-1619) married (1589) Mary's son, Star Castle (1593) on the Isle of Scilly in the Celtic Sea, the WS Society (1594), the Union of the Crowns (1603), the National Covenant (1638) and a Lord High Admiral named James II of England (1631-1701) became Knight of the Garter (1642).

Made three centuries after the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle (1687), a Scottish orphan named Flora MacDonald (1772-1790) from a tack named Milton in South Uist, Outer Hebrides, Scotland left the Tower of London (1747), Somerset v Stewart (1772), "The Wealth of Nations" (1776) by a Scotsman, New Lanark (1785), the Highland Clearances (c. 1790-1830), a Scottish member of the Faculty of Advocates (1532) named Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) who was made Principal Clerk of Session and Justiciary (1804) and granted permission to locate the Scottish Crown Jewels (1540), met (1797) a French daughter named Charlotte Genevieve Charpentier (1777-1826) at Lake District, Cumbria in England, the Heart of Midlothian (1817), a Welsh tragedienne named Sarah Kemble Siddons (1755-1831) became (1812) Lady Macbeth at Theatre Royal (1732) in London, England, an islet and lighthouse in Lismore, Inner Hebrides, Scotland named Eilean Musdile (1833) in the British Isles, a French 19th century mystic was transported on a naval ship named Virginie (1794) to New Caledonia (1853), a century after Forth Bridge (1890), Queen's Park (1867) in Glasgow (500s), Scotland, Nova Scotia (1867), more than a century after Bass Rock Lighthouse (1902) at the Firth of Forth, Scotland, Glasgow and West for Women's Suffrage (1902-1933), Caithness and Sutherland (1918-1997), less then a century after the conception of a Scottish actress named Deborah Jane Kerr-Trimmer (1921-2007) who lived in Helensburgh (1776), a Greek Crown Prince named Constantine I of Greece (1868-1923) regained the throne (1920), a Scottish marchioness named Her Grace Katharine Marjory Ramsay Stewart-Murray (1874-1960) became an MP (1923), a term called emotional blackmail (1947), Ladywell (1960s) in West Lothian, Scotland, the Catholic Women's Suffrage Society (1911) in London, England asked for the ordination of women (1963), a Scottish Honoris causa named Muriel Camberg Sarah Spark (1918-2006) became DBE (1993), an Australian watercraft named Queen of Peace (1995),a voice from Scotland communicated with words: "Choose life, choose a job, choose a career, choose a family … choose a starter home … choose a future …" (1996), the Scottish Parliament (1999), the British-Irish Council (1999), Her Majesty's Advocate General for Scotland (1999), a Scottish-Italian Queen's counsel named Dame Elish Angiolini became Lord Advocate of Scotland (2006), six years before a Scottish lawyer named Nicola Ferguson Sturgeon was elected First Minister of Scotland (2014) and appointed to Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council (1708) and the Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014, contains interviews and a great and timely score.

This nine hour and forty-one minute retelling which is set in the 21st century in Scotland where a Mormaer of Lennox lived at Inchmurrin Castle in Loch Lomond, Scotland (1437), the Scottish red deer, a Munro named Meikle Says Law, the Wallace Monument (1869), Solway Firth and the Lady of the Lake, is impelled and reinforced by its fragmented narrative structure, rhythmic continuity, scene of a daughter of Scotland and comment: "… Rome's special daughter." A national documentary.

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
"...dynastic...", 18 April 2016
8/10

Finnish screenwriter, producer and director Mika Kaurismäki's feature film which he produced and which was written by American literary translator Linda Gaboriau and Canadian screenwriter Michael Marc Bouchard, is inspired by a play and real events. It premiered in Canada, was shot on locations in Finland and Germany and is a Finland-Canada-Sweden-Germany-France co-production. It tells the story about a Swedish foster child named Christina Augusta (1626-1689), born in a royal castle called Three Crowns (1697) in Stockholm, Sweden into the Swedish Empire (1611-1721), made queen-elect (1632) and sovereign in (1644).

Distinctly and precisely directed by Finnish filmmaker Mika Kaurismäki, this quietly paced and somewhat fictional tale which is narrated mostly from the protagonist's point of view, draws a concentrated portrayal of a majestically educated Queen of Sweden, Princess of Finland, Duchess of Estonia and Lady of Ingria and Wismar who had a lady-in-waiting and foster mother surnamed Leijonhufvud (1639-1644), was crowned King of Swedes, Goths and Vandals and who relinquished her rule, abdicated, went to Innsbruck, Tyrol in Austria and named herself Christina Alexandra (1654). While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions and cinematography by cinematographer Guy Dufaux, this dialog-driven and narrative-driven story about interdependence and autonomy and the distinct distinction between a human being and a religion was made more than eight centuries after a town called Stockholm (1252), seven centuries after Heidelberg University (1386) in Germany, five centuries after an Italian 16th century painter's work portraying an Italian consecrated virgin forenamed Lucia (1521), the House of Vasa (1523-1672), an English ship named Mary Willoughby (1536), Danviken Hospital (1558-1861), a liturgy called "The Red Book" (1577), the quote: "Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown." from Henry IV, Part II (1597), four centuries after the Protestant Union of Germany (1608-1621), the Catholic League of Germany (1609-1635), a Swedish confidant named Axel Gustafsson Oxenstierna (1583-1654) became Lord High Councillor of Sweden (1612), the Second Defenestration of Prague (1618), a Scottish-English Electress of Palatine (1085-1803) named Elizabeth Stuart (1596-1662) was crowned Queen of Bohemia (1619), Great Children's House (1624-1785) in Queen Street (1639), Stockholm, in Sweden, the Instrument of Government (1634), a Swedish countess called Catherine of Sweden (1548-1638) was appointed (1636) guardian of the child of a German Queen Dowager named Maria Eleonora of Brandenburg (1599-1655), Battle of Prague (1648), the Peace of Westphalia (1648), a Swedish courtier and maid of honour named Ebba Magnusson Brahe (1596-1674) petitioned Queen Christina and thereby succeeded in creating a city called Jacobstad in Finland (1652), four centuries after Accademia degli Arcadi (1690) in Rome, Italy, a poet, in a poem, possibly created Mother Svea (1672), three centuries after an English-Scottish gardener named Philip Miller (1691-1771) named a life Acacia (1754), a Swedish physician described a life called the White Butterfly which he named Pieris rapae and the yellowhammer (1758), Stockholm Palace (1760) and a Swedish stage actress named Ester Lovisa Sofia Augusti Solomon (1756-1790) became a court singer (1773) and the Catholic Church in Sweden (1781).

Made three centuries after a locality was named Vilhelmina (1804) after a German Queen consort named Friederike Dorothea Wilhelmina of Baden (1781-1826) who in 1797 was married per procura, the House of Bernadotte (1810), a Danish poet nicknamed Mother Koren referred to herself as "the noble abused foster daughter." (1814), two centuries after Wallin Girl's School (1831-1939) in Sweden, a Swedish Illis Quorum recipient named Carin Sophie Adlersparre (1823-1895) attended a finishing school (1836-1838), a Swedish instrumentalist named Marie Pauline Landby Åhman (1812-1904) started working (1851) at the Royal Swedish Orchestra (1526), a Scottish-Swedish governess named Jane Miller Thengberg (1822-1902) created a Girl's School for education of women teachers in Uppsala, Sweden called Klosterskolan (1855-1863), Riksdag (1866) in Sweden, an Icelandic painting called "Lady of the Mountain" (1866), Långholmen Prison (1880-1975), the birth of a Swedish chairperson named Signe Wilhelmina Ulrika Bergman (1869-1960) who participated in the Sixth Conference of the International Women's Suffrage Alliance (1911), an English art model named Lady Edith Villiers (1841-1936) became Lady of the Bedchamber (1895), a Swedish Madame named Gertrud Virginia Adelborg (1853-1943) authored a writing regarding women's political right to vote (1898), a Swedish poet lived at a place nicknamed the Blue Tower (1908-1912) and a royal UK training ship named HMS Clio (1858-1919) was certified for the reception of boys (1908), a term called the Electra complex (1913), ninety-four years after a Swedish social worker named Nelly Maria Thüring (1875-1972) became a member of the Riksdag (1921), eighty-two years after a feature film starring a Swedish actress named Greta Lovisa Gustafsson (1905-1990) called "Queen Christina" (1933), sixty-nine years after a Swedish author named Elin Matilda Elisabet Wägner (1882-1949) who was a teacher at Fogelstad Citizen School for Women (1922-1954) became a member (1944) of the Swedish Academy (1786), a singer with names meaning foreign and dweller in the valley sang: "Alas my love you do me wrong to treat me so discourteously … I sent thee kerchiefs for thy head ... that made thee be our harvest queen … fare thee well, adieu …" (1959), thirty-nine years after the Instrument of Government (1974), a Swedish author surnamed Norén wrote: "Song about woman's revolting roles" (1976), ten years after Equal Pay Day (2005), seven years after a voice sang within the mirror's edge: "… no shadows … red lights … let it … racing through …" (2008), contains a great and timely score by composer Anssi Tikanmäki.

This versatile retelling which is set in Sweden in the 17th century and where an Empress regnant of peace silences those at Her Majesty's Pleasure asking for a successor by committing a Most Excellent act where she declares her first cousin her son, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, substantial character development, rhythmic continuity, comment by Her Majesty: "I will have a private audience with whom I please." and the immediate acting performances by Swedish actress Malin Buska and Finnish actress Laura Birn. A dynastic narrative feature.

0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
"...authentic...", 12 April 2016
8/10

English producer and director Simon Curtis' second feature film which was written by Greek screenwriter Alexi Kaye Campbell, is inspired by real events. It premiered in Germany, was shot on locations in England, the Republic of Austria and USA and is a UK production which was produced by producers David M. Thompson and Kris Thykier. It tells the story about an Austrian-American survivor of Jewish ancestry named Maria Victoria Bloch-Bauer Altmann (1916-2011).

Distinctly and precisely directed by English filmmaker Simon Curtis, this quietly paced and somewhat fictional tale which is narrated mostly from the main characters' viewpoints, draws a transitional portrayal of a human being's last wishes. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions and distinct cinematography by Australian cinematographer Ross Emery, this dialog-driven and narrative-driven story about looting, pillaging, cultural legacy and a woman's identity where a character utters the words: "… where the past is asking something of the present." which was made nine centuries after the House of Habsburg (1282-1780), eight centuries after University of Vienna (1365), five centuries after the English Renaissance Theatre (1562-1642), a French Madame Royale named Elisabeth of France (1602-1644) was born at the Palace of Fontainebleau in Seine-et-Marne, Paris in France, more than three centuries after the Burgtheater (1741), a Spanish municipality called the Town of Our Lady the Queen of the Angels (1781), an Austrian harpsichordist and fortepianist named Maria Anna Walburga Ignatia Mozart (1751-1829) received a letter (1791) from a German musician named Constanze Cäcilia Josepha Johanna Aloysia Weber (1762-1842), almost two centuries after University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna (1817), the Viennese Democratic Women's Association (1848), an American author who authored an essay called "Woman in the Nineteenth Century" (1845) journeyed with her man to a city called Florence (1849), a double monarchy called the Austro-Hungarian Empire (1867-1918), the Imperial Elementary School Law (1869) in Austria, an Austrian advocate for women's rights named Marianne Perger Hainisch (1839-1936) founded the Austrian Association of Female Teachers and Educators (1869), Austrian Parliament Building (1883), Maria-Theresien-Platz (1889), the General Austrian Women's Association (1893), an Austrian physician named Gabriele Possanner (1869-1940) began practicing medicine (1897), Österreichische Galerie Belevedere (1903), a journal called International Women's Suffrage News or Jus Suffragi (1906-1924) in Geneva, Switzerland, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I (1907) by an Austrian painter from Baumgarten, Vienna in the Austrian Empire (1804-1867) named Gustav Klimt (1862-1918), A Finnish painting of a law book, an eagle and the Maiden of Finland called "The Attack" (1899), a Danish practitioner of law named Madame Henny Sophie Magnussen (1878-1937) became a lawyer in Denmark (1909), the Jewish League for Women's Suffrage (1912) in London, England, more than a century after an Austrian-Jewish chairwoman of the Austrian Women's Suffrage Committee (1906) named Ernestine Kisch Furth (1877-1946) signed a letter (1914) and ninety-nine years after a German essayist named Edith Stein (1891-1942) became a Doctor of Philosophy (1916).

Made ninety-seven years after Lower Austria became a state (1918), the end of the Kingdom of Hungary (1000-1918), the First Georgian Republic (1918) and Freedom Square (1918) in Tbilisi, Georgia, ninety-six years after Austrian women were represented in the Austrian parliament (1919), an Austrian Licentiatus theologiae named Marianne Weisl Beth (1890-1984) became a Doctor of Law (1921), eighty-four years after "Mädchen in Uniform" (1931) by an Austrian-Hungarian theater director named Leontine Sagan (1889-1974), seventy-nine years after a German-Jewish painter and civilian named Charlotte Salomon ¨ (1917-1943) was admitted (1936) to the United State School for Fine and Applied Arts (1924-1939), seventy years after a radio station called Rot-Weiss-Rot (1945-1955) and the death marches from Stutthof concentration camp (1939-1945) in the Republic of Poland (1944-1952) a few years before Poland became a real satellite state (1947) where many women reached the Baltic Sea, some were relocated to Malmö, Sweden and the rescue of Stutthof victims in Denmark (1945), sixty-eight years after the Jewish Documentation Center (1947), sixty-six years after a street in Austria was named Käthe-Leichter-Gasse (1949), sixty years after the Austrian State Treaty (1955), forty-nine years after an Austrian MP named Grete Rehor (1910-1987) became the first minister of the Austrian government (1966), forty-seven years after the Theatres Act (1968) in the UK, forty-three years after an English civilian and member of a professional body of women called the Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps (1918-1920) in France named Ruby Adelina Ord said: "We were not allowed to wear gloves because we might look like officers …" (1973), forty-one years after Mauthausen Museum (1975) in Upper Austria, thirty-six years after the Principle of Equality was initiated in Austria (1979), twenty- two years after the Prohibition Act (1947) was amended (1992) and Holocaust denial prohibited, seventeen years after the enactment of the Austrian Art Restitution Law (1998), the Austrian Constitutional Act (1998), the Children and Young Persons (Care and Protection) Act 1998 in New South Wales, Australia and the Crime and Disorder Act (1998) was granted Royal Assent in the UK, sixteen years after the release of a song called "Lake Constance" (1999), eleven-years after a German harpist named Charlotte Balzereit became a member of the Vienna Philharmonic (2004) and the Gabriele-Possanner-Park (2004), six years after a voice sang: "There are nine million bicycles in Beijing …" (2007) and seven years after the Chrystal Macmillan Building (2008) in Scotland, contains a great and timely score by composers Martin Phipps and Hans Zimmer.

This historic and biographically measured retelling which is set in America and Austria in the early 20th and 21st century and where a U.S. attorney-at-law named represents a mother in a lingering civil case, is impelled and reinforced by its fragmented narrative structure, subtle character development, rhythmic continuity, comment by Maria: "… there should be more women judges." and the advanced acting performance by English actress Dame Helen Mirren. An authentic narrative feature.

"...viable...", 28 March 2016
8/10

Australian screenwriter, producer and director Fred Schepisi's seventh feature film which he wrote with Australian screenwriter Robert Caswell (1946-2006), is inspired by real events which took place in Australia in 1980. It premiered in Australia, was shot on locations in Australia and is an Australia-United States co-production which was produced by producer Verity Lambert. It tells the story about a thirty-one-year-old Australian mother named Alice Lynne Murchison Chamberlain.

Distinctly and subtly directed by Australian filmmaker Fred Schepisi, this quietly paced and somewhat fictional tale which is narrated from multiple viewpoints though mostly from the main characters' point of view, draws a judicial portrayal of an Australian father named Michael Chamberlain who went with his wife, their sons and their daughter named Azaria to a city called Mount Isa (1923) in the state of Queensland, Australia and how a baby coat and inventions caused a persecution of a family. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions and cinematography by cinematographer Ian Baker, this dialog-driven and narrative-driven story about Australian history was made more than four centuries after the Republic of Florence (1115-1532) became a hereditary monarchy, the name Australia was written in a treatise (1545) and Her Most Excellent Majesty Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533-1603) named a former North American monarchy Virginia (1584), New Holland (1644) was named by a Dutch sailor named Abel Janszoon Tasman (1603-1659) and the Battle of Dunbar (1650), a century after a musical instrument called gravicembalo col piano e forte was exhibited in a commune called Florence in Italy (1708), an English memoirist named Matthew Flinders (1774-1814) wrote: "I call the Island Australia, or Terra Australis." (1814), Van Diemen's Land (1825-1856) and the state of Perth (1829), a century after Her Serene Highness Adelaide Amelia Louise Theresa Caroline (1792-1849) became Queen mother (1837), City of Adelaide (1840), an English teacher named Elizabeth Whitehead Malleson (1828-1916) created the Working Women's College (1864) in Queen Square (1725), the Edinburgh Seven (1869), an Irish-Australian daughter named Julia Margaret Guerin (1858-1923) from Victoria (1851), Australia attained her Bachelor of Arts (1883), the Electoral Act (1863) in Victoria, New Zealand, an English forewoman named Frances Mary Buss (1827-1894) became president of the Association of Headmistresses (1874), the conception of an Australian-Jewish physician named Constance Ellis (1872-1992) who graduated in 1903, a monolith was given the name Ayers Rock (1873), the New England Girl's School (1875), The Dawn: A Journal for Australian Women (1888-1905) was created by an Australian poet named Louisa Albury Lawson (1848-1920), ninety-eight years after an Australian sister from Tasmania (1825) named Emma Constance Stone (1856-1902) became registered at the Medical Board of Victoria (1890), ninety-seven years after the Women's Suffrage Petition (1891) in Victoria, Australia and ninety-three years after Constitution (Female Suffrage) Act (1895) in South Australia.

Made eighty-nine years after the Paris Olympic Games (1900) and the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act (1900), eighty-eight years after the ratification of the Constitution of Australia (1901), eighty years after an Australian member of the British Artist's Suffrage League (1907-1918) named Dora Meeson Coates (1869-1955) painted a banner which was carried during the English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Australian, New Zealand, Canadian, Indian and South African Women's Coronation Processions (1911) in London, England where some dressed like a Swedish Nightingale and an English opera singer named Grace Darling (1815-1842), seventy-eight years after Australian Capital Territory (1910), seventy-seven years after Northern Territory (1911), seventy-five years after the naming of an Australian city called Canberra at Capital Hill (1913), seventy-two years after a poet from Wellington (1840), New Zealand named Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp Murry (1888-1923) befriended an English 19th century thinker in London, England (1916), sixty-eight years after an Australian citizen named Edith Dircksey Cowan (1881-1932) became a Justice of the Peace (1920), sixty-six years after the Queensland Maternity Act (1922), sixty-five years after the Queensland Jury Act (1923), fifty-nine years after an Australian poet of Cornish ancestry named Judith Arundell Wright (1915-2000) attended (1929) the New England Girls' School (1895), forty-nine years after a thirteen-year-old English human being and Queen of the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth Realms styled Queen of England, Australia and Canada and Her Majesty in Right of New Zealand said: "… In the name of the women of the British Empire … nor do we forget the gallant womanhood of France …" (1939), forty-six years after the Australian Women's Land Army (1942) and the Widows Pensions Act (1942), twenty-three years after an Australian state governor named Dame Roma Flinders Mitchell (1913-2000) became a judge of the Supreme Court of South Australia (1965), twenty-one years after an Australian poet named Lady Joan á Beckett Weigall Lindsay (1896-1984) published a novel (1967), an Australian educator named Mary Kathleen Burrow (1899-1987) became president of the Australian National Council of Women (1969), six years before the Mayors for Peace (1982), twenty years before the first justice of the peace courts were established in Scotland (2008), twenty-one years before a sixteen-year-old New Zealand-Australian sailor named Jessica Watson began her voyage (2009) and an English singer sang:"... I took the stars from my ..." (2009) contains a great and timely score by composer Bruce Smeaton.

This retelling which is set in Oceania in the late 20th century and where people advocated more for the dignity of a Dingo than for a woman, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, substantial character development, rhythmic continuity, comment by Alice: "… my heart …" and the lingering acting performances by American actress Meryl Streep and New Zealand actor Sam Neill. A viable narrative feature.

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
"...enlightening...", 17 March 2016
8/10

Irish director Mike Connolly's documentary series which he produced and which was written by English-Irish author Fergal Keane and Irish author Neil Hegarty, is inspired by real events. It premiered on the Irish television channel BBC Northern Ireland, was shot on locations in Ireland, UK, France, USA, the Netherlands, Italy, Norway and South Africa and is a UK production. It tells the story about a human race of multi-ethnic origins who invaded Great Britain many many years ago.

Distinctly and subtly directed by Irish filmmaker Mike Connolly, this quietly paced documentary which is narrated by an English-Irish journalist and from multiple viewpoints, draws a substantial and historically contextual portrayal of an Island with thirty-two counties and a constituent unit consisting of eleven districts. While notable for its versatile and atmospheric milieu depictions and cinematography by cinematographer Séamus McCracken, this narrative-driven and dialog-driven story about contested identities was made millenniums before an Irishman called the Clonycavan man, many centuries after an Irishwoman forenamed Brigit was an Abbess of Kildare, a mountain called the Hill of Tara was documented in a mythological writing called the Book of Invasions, the Irish who were forced to migrate to make place for English settlers had to pass the River Shannon and English refugees founded a colony called New England, more than nine centuries after a work by a Welshman called the Topography of Ireland or Topographia Hibernica (1188) was published, eight centuries after the birth of a Princess of Wales named Joan of Kent (1328-1385), five centuries after the birth of an Irish noblewoman and Countess of Lincoln named Lady Elizabeth FitzGerald (1527-1590) in Maynooth, County Kildare in the province of Leinster in Ireland, the birth of an English sister named Joan Arden Shakespeare (1569-1646), HM Queen Elizabeth I wrote: "… the Scotch-Irish … our true and mere right to the country of Ulster and the crown of Ireland." (1573), the Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland (1592), four centuries after a Princess of Orange named Mary Henrietta Stuart (1631-1660) who was designated Princess Royal (1642) gave birth to a Prince of Orange and King of England, Ireland and Scotland named William III (1650-1702), the Earldom of Drogheda (1661), the Irish brigade (1690-1791), a sectarian conflict called the Battle of the Boyne (1690) and a twenty-one-year-old 18th century Irish harper surnamed O'Carolan who once composed a song called "The Fairy Queen" began his journey through Ireland, three centuries after the Collins Barracks (1702-1997) and the birth of an Irish actress named Maria Ann Campion Pope (1777-1808) in Waterford, Munster, Ireland.

Made more than two centuries after a French Viscount of Barras and nobleman named Paul François Jean Nicolas (1755-1799) became president of the French Directory (1785-1799), an Irish son named Théobald Wolf Tone (1763-1798) founded the Society of United Irishmen (1791), the Blight (1845), University College Cork (1845), University College, Galway (1845), an Irish Archbishop of Armagh and Dublin named Cardinal Paul Cullen (1803-1878) was consecrated (1850), University College Dublin (1854), the Palace of Westminster (1870), the National Museum of Ireland (1877), a French attorney named Camille Sée (1847-1919) initiated the creation of École normale superiéure de jeunes filles (1881-1985), Letterfrack Industrial School (1885-1974), an Irish painter who was born in Corfu, Greece named Edith Anna Œnonne Somerville (1858-1949) met an Irish author named Violet Florence Martin (1862-1913), Mary Immaculate College (1898), an English-American mother named Lady Randolph Churchill (1854-1921) chartered a hospital ship to care for those wounded in the Second Boer War (1899-1902) in South Africa (1900), Irish suffragettes named Johanna Mary Sheehy Skeffington (1877-1946) and Margaret Elizabeth Gillespie Cousins (1878-1954) made the Irish Women's Franchise League (1908), an Irish daughter named Mary O'Connor Ryan (1873-1961) became a university professor (1910), the conception of a survivor named HMS Caroline (1914) who still stands at Alexandra Dock, Belfast in Northern Ireland, an Englishwoman named Caroline Selina Blumfield Ganley (1879-1966) became a Justice of the Peace (1920), the Republic of Ireland-United Kingdom border (1921), a French playwright surnamed Pagnol who was elected into the Académie Française in 1946, published a novel called "The Water on the Hills" (1963), the creation of a prison called Kilmainham Gaol (1971), an Englishwoman of Irish ancestry sang: "… this kicking here inside … Your sister I was born …" (1978), an Irish mystic sang: "… Life of lives …" (1987), the Fifteenth Amendment to the Constitution Act (1995), the Maynooth University (1997), an Irish research project discovered a fortress called Linn Duchaill in Annagassan, County Louth, Ireland (2010) and the Children First Act (2015), contains interviews with professors, historians, archaeologists, peasants, musicians, students, citizens and a great and timely score.

This informative and majestically presented four hour and fifty-four minute journey through the history of a nation known as the Emerald Isle which is set mostly in Ireland and the UK in the 21st century and where a border of Wales and body of water called the Irish Sea tells an extraordinary story of a transcending relationship, is impelled and reinforced by its fragmented narrative structure, rhythmic continuity, photographs, voice recordings and archival footage. An enlightening documentary series.

The Hunger Strike (2006) (TV)
"...educational...", 2 March 2016
8/10

Irish producer and director Margo Harkin's documentary which she wrote, is inspired by real events which took place during the Troubles (1968-1998). It premiered in the UK, was shot on locations in the UK and is a UK-Ireland co-production which was produced by producer Joel Conroy. It tells the story about people in Northern Ireland and a psychological and political war between state authorities and civilians which escalated after Operation Banner (1969-2007) and reached a stalemate in 1981.

Distinctly and precisely directed by Irish filmmaker Margo Harkin, this quietly paced documentary which is narrated from multiple viewpoints, draws an informative portrayal of experiences. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions, this dialog-driven and narrative-driven story about English-Irish history, national security policy, so-called non-violent resistance, fear mongering, statecraft, Irish unionist loyalism, Irish republican nationalism, segregation and intimidation, was made eight centuries after the Norman Invasion of Ireland (1167), more than five centuries after the Queen Mary Harp (1450s), three centuries after an English actress named Mary Saunderson Betterton (1637-1712) made her first stage performance (1662), the Cromwellian Conquest of Ireland (1649-1653) and the posthumous execution of an English 17th century father named Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658), more than two centuries after the Battle of the Diamond (1795), a century after the Apprentice Boys of Derry (1814) in Derry, County Londonderry, UK, the Great Irish Famine (1845-1852), the Young Irelander (1842-1849) received the Irish tricolor (1848), the London Underground (1863), an English author named Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (1804-1881) became prime minister and the Public Schools Act (1868), an English mountaineer named Lucy Walker (1836-1916) climbed the Matterhorn (1871), the Protection of Persons and Property Act (1881), an Irish professor from Virginia, Ireland named Agnes Winifred O'Farrelly (1874-1951) became the first woman Irish-language poet with the publication of "Love and Anguish" (1901) and an Irish actress named Edith Maud Gonne Macbride (1866-1953) who was president of Daughters of Ireland (1900-1914) participated in a one-act play called "Cathleen Ni Houlihan" (1902) by an Irish poet named William Butler Yates (1865-1939) and an Irish theater manager named Isabella Augusta Persee, Lady Gregory (1852-1932) who founded the Irish Literary Theater (1899-1901), ninety-eight years after Queen's University Belfast (1908), ninety-five years after George V (1865-1936) and Mary of Tech (1867-1953) respectively became King and Queen consort of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions (1867-1953) in 1911, ninety-two years after the Defence of the Realm Act (1914), eighty-nine years after an Irish teacher named Thomas Patrick Ashe (1885-1917), eighty-seven years after an Irish daughter and only child named Sheila Humphreys (1899-1994) became a member of the Irishwomen's Council (1919), eighty-five years after an Irish sister who was born in London, England named Mary MacSwiney (1872-1942) became a Teachta Dála (1921), eighty-four years after the Guardian of the Peace (1922) was created in Dublin, Ireland, the Royal Ulster Constabulary (1922-2001) and an Englishwoman named Helena Florence Normanton (1882-1957) became the first woman King's Counsel in England (1922).

Made eighty-four years after an Irish politician named Lady Ellen Odette Bischoffsheim Cuffe, Countess of Desart (1857-1933) became an independent member of the Seanad Éireann (1922), eighty-two years after the Irish Defence Forces (1924), sixty-nine years after the Constitution of Ireland (1937), sixty-eight years after the Offences against the State Acts (1938-1998), sixty-seven years after a declaration of a state of emergency by the Dáil Éireann (1939), fifty-seven years after the ratification of the Republic of Ireland Act 1948 (1949), forty years after the UCDC (1966), thirty-seven years after the first peace lines in Northern Ireland (1969), thirty-six years after the Irish women's liberation movement and the Falls Curfew (1970), thirty-five years after the opening of Her Majesty's Prison Maze (1971-2000), thirty-four years after Special Category Status was granted by a deputy prime minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (1972), thirty-three years after the Northern Ireland (Emergency Provisions) Act (1973) and the Diplock Courts (1973), thirty-one years after the Northern Ireland women's rights movement (1975), twenty-six years after a human being who as a fourteen-year-old student became a volunteer began a protest in the Armagh Women's Prison (1780s-1986) in 1980 where an Irish grandmother named Jackie Upton was one of a few Protestant women amongst numerous Catholic women, twenty-five years after, an Irish voice communicated the thirty-one-year life of a Northern Irish sister from Falls Road, West Belfast named Mairead Farrell (1957-1988) through the words: "… I pledged to fight for the … strip searches were … degraded me …", seventeen years after the commencement of the Official Secrets Act (1989), thirteen years after the Downing Street Declaration (1993), twelve years after the Extradition (Amendment) Act (1994) was ratified by the Oireachtas, nine years after an Irish mother sang: "… Can't you forgive what you think I've done … talk to me Englishman what good will shutting me out …" (1997), the Northern Ireland Act (1998), one year before the London Overground (2007), four years before many, concerning the Saville Inquiry (1998-2010), spoke of the creation of an unjust hierarchy of victims, six years before the introduction of the Civil Service (Special Advisors) Bill (2012), nine years before the Justice (Northern Ireland) Act (2015), members of Adodána called for a repeal of the Eight Amendment of the Irish Constitution (2015) and ten years before a twenty-two-year-old Irish activist named Ellen Murray decided to run for election in Stormant, Belfast (2016), contains interviews and a great and timely score.

This retelling which is set in the UK in the late 20th century when an Irish filmmaker named Pat Murphy's feature film debut called "Maeve" (1981) premiered and before UK citizens called for a more woman balanced UK Parliament, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, rhythmic continuity, archival footage and comment by an Irish Doctor of Law named Séan Donlon: "It's a long and one might say noble tradition in Irish history." An educational documentary.

Elizabeth (1998)
"...thinking...", 16 February 2016
8/10

Indian screenwriter and director Shekhar Kapur's fourth feature film which was written by English screenwriter Michael Hirst, is inspired by real events which took place in the late 16th century. It premiered in the Out of competition section at the 59th Venice Film Festival in 1998, was screened in the Gala Presentations section at the 23rd Toronto International Film Festival in 1998, was shot on locations in England and New Zealand and is a UK-USA co-production which was produced by producers Alison Owen, Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner. It tells the story about a twenty-one-year-old person and Princess of England and Ireland who lived at a royal estate called Hatfield in Hertfordshire, England during the reign of her father named King Henry VIII (1491-1547) and his first wife named Catherine of Aragon (1485-1536) who were the parents of her half-sister called Bloody Mary (1542-1587), who as a thirty-seven-year-old in the early 1550s entered a royal marriage with her first cousin once removed named Philip II of Spain (1527-1598) in the present Rywraneth Unys Breten Veur ha Kledbarth Iwerdon.

Distinctly and precisely directed by Indian filmmaker Shekhar Kapur, this quietly paced and somewhat fictional tale which is narrated mostly from the protagonist's point of view, draws a cinematographic portrayal of a daughter of England who was conceived the year before the Succession to the Crown Act 1533 was granted Royal assent and almost a decade after the Crown of Ireland Act 1542, who due to being born in wedlock and another Act of parliament was branded as an illegitimate child, who befriended a properly married lady-in-waiting named Bess of Hardwick, Countess of Shrewsbury (1527-1608), as a fourteen-year-old was introduced to and educated by the sixth wife of Henry VIII, who sympathized with an Englishwoman forenamed Anne who was racked before she was burned alive on a stake, named Katherine Parr (1512-1548), was taken to the Queen's lodgings in the Tower of London suspected of treason (1554), after the Kingdom of France (843-1792) regained the Pale of Calais (1346-1558) in the Siege of Calais (1558) and her inauguration (1559) and a response to the religious divisions in England called the Elizabethan Religious Settlement (1559) made an English nobleman named Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester (1532-33-1588) Master of the Horse, as a twenty-nine-year-old was infected by the Red Plague or Smallpox, whilst in her forties was excommunicated by an Italian Pope named Antonio Ghislieri (1504-1572), was advised by the Queens Majesties Most Honourable Privy-Council, granted the Queen's consent to the Elizabethan … Law (1601), who said: "We princes are set as it were upon stages in the sight and view of the world." and who during a period in time when a musical instrument called Harpsichord and a prison called the Marshalsea (1373-1842) which in 1629 imprisoned an English polymath named John Seldon (1584-1654) for his participation in drafting the Petition of Right (1628) was significant, advocated for yet another inalienable right called freedom of conscience.

While notable for its versatile and atmospheric milieu depictions and cinematography by cinematographer Remi Adefarasin, this dialog-driven and narrative-driven story about English history, royal prerogative and national independence where one of the Queen's subjects utters the words: "Her Majesty's body and person are no longer her own property. They belong to the state." and a daughter of France and mother of Elizabeth's only sister who was born in the commune of Bar-Le-Duc, Lorraine in France named Marie of Guise (1515-1560) said: "English blood on French colors." which was made more than two centuries after an English 17th century Royalist and author named Mary Errington Astell (1666-1731) wrote: "To question the customs and laws of marriage is to question society itself ..." (1700), more than a century after a Welsh father founded a crèche in a village called New Lanark in Scotland and the birth of an English 19th century author named Charlotte Brönte (1816-1855), a photograph called "Sadness" (1864), the publication of the words: "… Queen of the Angels, Queen of the May." (1871) and an Australian soprano named Helen Porter Mitchell (1861-1931) who was born in Richmond, Virginia, Australia moved to Marian, Queensland, Australia (1881), eighty years after an English servicewoman named Florence Beatrice Green (1901-2012) joined the Women's Royal Air Force (1918), sixty-two years after an orchestral march called Crown Imperial was performed during the coronation of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth (1937) and twenty-nine years after a twenty-one-year-old Irish daughter named Josephine Bernadette Devlin McAliskey became the youngest MP in the UK and wrote: "… Catholics and Protestants are the ordinary people, the oppressed people from whom I come and whom I represent. I stand here as the youngest woman in Parliament, in the same tradition as the first woman ever elected to this …", depicts an abridged study of character and contains a great and timely score by composer David Hirschfelderth.

This biographical, historic and terminologically regal character piece from the late 1990s which is set in England, Scotland and France during the Elizabethan era (1558-1603) in the early 16th century some years before the completion of a theater called The Red Lion (1567-1568) in London, England, three centuries before an English stage actress named Alice Ellen Terry (1847-1928) acted in a one-act play called "The First Actress" (1911), five centuries before an English singer sang: "… blood is running deep … oh the Queen of Peace … like a long scream out there always echoing …" (2015) where religion, the monarchy and the state were governed by people and by Her Excellency and His Royal Highness the Archbishop of Canterbury said: "I crown thee Elizabeth Queen of England, Ireland and France.", is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, substantial character development, rhythmic continuity, comment by Her Grace: "I ask you why we must tear ourselves apart for this small question of religion?" and the transcending acting performance by Australian actress Cate Blanchett. A thinking narrative feature.

"...grandiloquent...", 10 February 2016
8/10

Indian screenwriter and director Shekhar Kapur's sixth feature film which was written by English screenwriters William Nicholson and Michael Hirst, is inspired by real events which took place in the late 16th century. It premiered in the Gala Presentations section at the 32nd Toronto International Film Festival in 2007, was shot on locations in England, Scotland and Spain and is a UK-Spain-France co- production which was produced by producers Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner and Jonathan Cavendish. It tells the story about a Queen of England and Ireland who was born in the Palace of Placentia in Greenwich, London, England in the early 1530s and who was the daughter of an English composer named Henry Tudor (1491-1547) and an English royal consort named Anne Boleyn (1501-1536).

Distinctly and precisely directed by Indian filmmaker Shekhar Kapur, this quietly paced and somewhat fictional tale which is narrated mostly from the main character's point of view, draws a cinematographic portrayal of a Spanish King named Philip who aspires to make his daughter named Isabella Clara Eugenia who is an infante of Spain, the new Queen of the Kingdom of England and a Scottish Queen named Mary Stuart who is imprisoned in a castle called Fotheringhay in England. While notable for its versatile and atmospheric milieu depictions, cinematography by cinematographer Remi Adefarasin, production design by production designer Guy Hendrix Dyas and costume design by costume designer Alexandra Byrne, this dialog-driven and narrative-driven story about English history which was made seven years before an English polymath sang her words: "… think of it as a marriage refusal by me executioner … in a vertical impalement I hope you're not too tender … Mary … Queen of Scots…" depicts an abridged study of character and contains a great and timely score by composers Craig Armstrong and A.R. Rahman.

This somewhat biographical, historic and terminologically spiritual character piece from the late 2000s which is set in England, Scotland and Spain in the late 16th century during the Tudor Dynasty (1485- 1603) and the Spanish Armada (1588) and where a pretender to the English throne who has legitimate claims to it thinks she knows what's best for England and the authentic Queen puts her loyalty to her nation before anything and anyone including herself, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, substantial character development, rhythmic continuity, soundless comment by Mary I of Scotland: "I forgive you with all my …" and the majestic acting performances by Australian actress Cate Blanchett, Australian actor Geoffrey Rush and English actress Samantha Morton. A grandiloquent narrative feature.

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
"...androgynous...", 10 February 2016
8/10

Swedish television and film director Simon Kaijser's television miniseries which was written by English author and screenwriter Amanda Coe, is inspired by real events which took place in England in the early 20th century. It premiered on English television in 2015, was shot on locations in England and is a UK production which was produced by producer Rhonda Smith. It tells the story about a twenty-three-year-old author who was born in Kensington, Middlesex, London in England in the early 1880s.

Distinctly and precisely directed by Swedish filmmaker Simon Kaijser, this quietly paced and somewhat fictional tale which is narrated by and mostly from the main characters' viewpoints, draws a perspicacious portrayal of a twenty-six-year-old sister. While notable for its distinctly atmospheric milieu depictions, cinematography by cinematographer Allan Almond, production design by production designer David Roger and costume design by costume designer Claire Anderson, this dialog-driven and narrative-driven story about English history which was made a century after an English painter named Vanessa Stephen Bell (1879-1961) and a Scottish painter from Rothiemurchus, Aviemore, Scotland named Duncan Grant (1885-1978) arrived in Charleston, Sussex, England (1916), depicts several interrelated studies of character and contains a great and timely score by composer Edmund Butt.

This conversational and cinematographic retelling which is set in England in the early 20th century more than a century after a photograph called "Julia Jackson" (1867) and where poets and painters create a group, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, substantial character development, rhythmic continuity, comment by Leonard: "Our whiff of shot in the cause of freedom." and the reverent acting performances by English actresses Lydia Leonard, Phoebe Fox, Catherine McCormack and Eve Best. An androgynous miniseries.


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