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crossbow0106

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506 reviews in total 
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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
A Recent Memory, 6 July 2014
9/10

Anyone familiar with the work of Sion Sono knows he pushes the limits of things, whether they be taste or life. This film does the same but in an entirely different way from his more recent work. The film is about an earthquake in Nagashima and possible effects of radiation from a nuclear power plant not that far away. Yasuhiko Ono refuses to leave, staying with his wife Chieko, who has a form of dementia. He is asked to leave and refuses, but insists his son Yoichi and daughter in law Izumi (played by the star of Sono's Guilty Of Romance, Megumi Kagurazaka)evacuate, which they finally do. Izumi finds out she is pregnant and, though according to the government is in a safe area, is so cautious about radiation she makes everyone in town dislike her. If you have never lived through a natural disaster you would have no idea what to do. Despite this, the film is not depressing. There are moments that are poignant, but its also about a by now weary people and the choices they make. A particularly amazing scene is when Yasuhiko finds Chieko, who wandered away, and puts her on his back. That expression of love is simple but uplifting. While the subject matter can be emotionally jarring, it is a film with purpose and even some restraint. Mr. Sono continues to be a terrific writer/director and this somewhat departure from his latest films like Love Exposure, Cold Fish and Guilty Of Romance is just another example of his uncompromising, brilliant work.

After The Fact, 28 June 2014
7/10

This is a nine episode miniseries about police officers who seem to be underemployed, as they don't otherwise seem to be doing much about crime. Kiriyama decides as a hobby to solve expired cases, meaning there is a 15 year statute of limitations on catching a murderer. He confronts the persons that knew the victim and does some honest detective work. With him is Mikka, who helps him in his endeavors and seems to have a crush on the somewhat enigmatic Kiriyama. Every episode is stand alone and fun to watch. Its not a binge watching drama, it works best if you watch one per week. Its billed as a comedy, and it does have comedic overtones. Kiriyama confronts the killer and the episode is over. Not a great drama but worthy of your time.

4 out of 5 people found the following review useful:
Couldn't Happen To A Nicer Guy, 7 June 2014
8/10

This film is about entertainment manager Shep Gordon, who got his start by agreeing to manage (and, 43 years later, continues to manage) Alice Cooper. He also manages others, and this documentary goes through his life. You hear from people who you don't see commenting in films often, like Michael Douglas, Mike Myers (who also directed) Alice Cooper himself. It glosses over many things, there are no scandals, no moments of jaw dropping revelation, just the story of a man looking back at his career mostly with a smile. The most poignant part of the film are the parts involving the late Teddy Pendergrass, but there is also commentary from an ex's grandkids, whom Shep has all but adopted. Although now semi-retired and living in paradise in Maui, he still sees people all the time. Again, nothing scandalous, just a mostly straight forward telling of a man who mucked through the entertainment industry and still comes out of it well loved and admired. I recommend it to anyone who is interested in the subject, but it really is refreshing to watch a documentary about someone who hasn't been anything but a good person and who is held in high esteem by his friends and colleagues.

2 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
At Times Wonderful, At Times Not, 20 May 2014
8/10

This film is a series of interconnected situations regarding relationships, all based in the same family. Davy and Ally come back from combat, to seemingly the delight of everyone. Ally looks to rekindle his relationship with Liz, who is Davy's sister. Davy meets Liz's best friend Yvonne and they begin a relationship. Liz and Davy's parents Rab and Jean appear very happy about this. There, however, are secrets and actions that threaten to undermine all of the relationships. When the film is set to songs by the Scottish group The Proclaimers (American audiences will know them from their big hit 500 Miles (I'm Gonna Be),sung by the characters and others joining in, the movie is wonderful, it is vibrant and fun, along with sad and even heartbreaking. When the stories are told without music the movie falters, since it becomes almost like a soap opera. However, look past those moments and bask in the great city of Edinburgh and sing along if you can. Its those moments that make this film really worthwhile.

2 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
Poignant But Good, 8 December 2013
8/10

This film is all the more poignant since Levon has recently passed, but the film itself is also about resolve, dreams and looking forward. Levon developed throat cancer, and the treatments caused him to lose his voice. The film is about the struggle and wish to regain his voice and make a comeback, which he did, releasing two great studio albums (Dirt Farmer and Electric Dirt) and a live recording, Live At The Ryman. The film visits the past of course, and it touches on his feud with former Band guitarist Robbie Robertson over song credits, but it is more about the then present. Deceased Band members Rick Danko and Richard Manuel are touched on, and it is obvious Levon misses them (we all do). The post-cancer career Levon had was a gift to his fans, and he will never be forgotten. Somewhere, he, Rick and Richard are harmonizing together. For now, any fan of Levon and The Band should watch this, along with The Last Waltz, the extraordinary final show of The Band. Levon is greatly missed by so many, but this film makes us love him just as much as we always did and in that way, it triumphs.

2 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
Interesting, Unusual Approach, But Not Essential, 6 October 2013
7/10

Depending on how much you like the Replacements will be how much you like this documentary. First off, two things you need to know: None of the Replacements are interviewed, and there is no footage of them. You have various people, most you've never seen before but do have credibility in telling this story, which is done chronologically. If you have seen them live (I have four times-twice riveting, twice not so), you just never knew what you were going to get. If they were sober and interested, they were one of the greatest bands that ever existed. If they were drunk and doing mostly covers, you'd hate to have brought someone to the show and told them beforehand they were amazing. This film embodies this, and some of the comments are very affecting. The people who speak that are known, including Grant Hart and Greg Norton of Husker Du (that would make an interesting documentary), manage to tell their stories and they are mostly articulate and wonderful. Think of the film this way: Lets say a documentary of your favorite band was being made and they asked you to comment. There is gushing, some dismissive anecdotes. If you're a casual fan, you won't get it. If you are a real fan, this will be very watchable. I would have liked to see Paul, Tommy or Chris speak, but you can't have everything. Last thought: Does this film make you want to buy or listen to them? The answer is yes. In that alone, this film succeeds.

Wonderful, 31 July 2013
9/10

Sridevi has made a return to film in this meaty role in which she plays Shashi, a traditional lady in India who speaks mostly Hindi while her husband and children are very versed in English. They even put her down about it. She is asked to go to America to help her sister plan her daughter's wedding, and she has to go alone. She is a veritable fish out of water, not being able to communicate properly in English, even causing trouble at a coffee shop (that scene tries to reinforce the notion that Americans are rude. That notion is dispelled soon enough, however). Frustrated, she enrolls in a four week English learning course, to fit in better. Brave to Sridevi, who is great in this role. Like Sadha, in which she plays an amnesiac who becomes childlike, she becomes the character so convincingly it is almost like she isn't even acting. Still such a pretty lady with big beautiful brown eyes, she just radiates. I highly recommend this film, especially to anyone who has known the immigrant experience. Even if you haven't, this light comedy is very much worth watching.

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
Little Crazy But Very Interesting Documentary, 28 July 2013
8/10

This doc is about and features the somewhat eccentric but amazing drummer Ginger Baker, of Cream and Blind Faith fame. The film goes through his life chronologically, with some interesting commentary from his family (3 of his wives), a few of his kids, but especially artists from the time, like Clapton, Jack Bruce and a host of admiring drummers who give their insights on his legacy. Throughout the film, the chain smoking Baker appears sometimes to be put off by having to recollect various times in his life, but that would be true of just about anyone. Just watching some of the great clips over the times you realize that he just had the profound ability to play. If you're a fan of his work, this is essential. Otherwise, this is a worthy rock doc from a unique talent who has survived long enough to be able to tell it as he saw it. Very watchable.

2 out of 3 people found the following review useful:
Silly, Crazy, Gross, 10 July 2013
4/10

If you have watched Tokyo Gore Police and Machine Girl this is similar in its extreme. There's blood like those other two films, but this one is far more gross. As the title suggests, there are special effects that are pretty graphic. I don't recommend you eat before this film if you have a weak stomach. There are a few good fight scenes but they do not redeem the film enough. Of course, its not supposed to be real, but it borders on being disgusting. I give credit to the Japanese for being inventive enough to go to these kind of extremes, but this film is a bit too much to handle. I think teens, early 20's people who like zombie films that are out there may find this worth watching but it is not for mass appeal.

Sadma (1983)
Good, Absorbing, Funny, Poignant, Well Acted, 10 July 2013
8/10

Sadma is the story of Rashmi (the very good and very pretty Sridevi), who gets into a car accident and not only has amnesia but reverts to a six year old. Samu, played by the versatile Kamal Hassan, gets taken to a brothel by his best friend and finds her there. He rescues her and takes her to his village. The film is about how Rashmi responds to things as a six year old, her child like ways. She smiles, giggles, looks sad and frightened, often in a very short time. In the hands of lesser actors, this would be a very tough film to stay with, but with Sridevi and Mr. Hassan you grow to care so much about them and to appreciate their relationship. The question is whether Rashmi regains her memory. Also in this film in a more seductive role, though its not as a main character, is Silk Smitha. However, this is Sridevi's film, her big beautiful eyes expressing all of the emotions/feelings she has. Recommended for the story itself, but more recommended for Sridevi and Kamal Hassan, who are both talented and make an engaging pair.


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