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AllisonLVenezio

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6 out of 6 people found the following review useful:
Excellent special--great time warp!, 6 January 2006
9/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Chances are, if you're a huge "Saturday Night Live" fan like yours truly, you sometimes pine for the days of the Church Lady, Tommy Flanagan the Pathelogical Liar, the Sweeney Sisters, Gumby, Joe Piscopo (OR Phil Hartman) belting out Sinatra tunes (and insults), and long haired Dennis Miller flipping back his "luxurious hair" and giggling his way through "Weekend Update." Maybe you even pine for the days of Gilbert Godfried's short tenure...or maybe you don't. If you liked the seemingly chaotic cast and writing of the early eighties seasons, or prefer the return to greatness bought about by the cast of the mid to late eighties, this is the special for you.

"Saturday Night Live In the '80s: Lost and Found" was a two-hour special that aired on NBC in November 2005, and focused on the eighties era of Saturday Night Live, from the turbulent, almost unwatchable years in 1980-1984, to a sort-of rebuilding that ended too quickly in 1985, a complete downturn in 1985-1986, and a revival that saved the show in 1986. Along the way, we revisit with some of the more famous (and least famous) names of the decade, several of the hosts that saw it all, and the man that came back and used his clever casting decisions to save the show in the mid-eighties, Lorne Michaels. This special has it all.

This was a stellar, solid special. Much of the moments they showed were funny, but unfortunately, much of the clips before the last 45 minutes weren't among the greatest moments. The special itself focuses primarily on what was wrong with between 1980 and 1986, and by the time they showed what went right with the last half of the decade, there was only 40 minutes left! And, to top it off, entire groups weren't represented--missing from the solid 1986-1990 cast was "Weekend Update" mainstay Dennis Miller. Where was he? I never heard of any actual problems he had with the show, but he also did not participate in the tell-all book that came out a few years ago. He did, however, participate in the 25th Anniversary in 1999, which leads me to believe that he had no hard feelings about the show or Lorne Michaels. And Jan Hooks--where was she? She was a very pivotal part of the late 1980s, and yet she isn't interviewed here. However, one of the main reasons I watched (aside for the great clips and even funnier stills), was for Dana Carvey, who has been my absolute favorite "SNL" alumnus for a long time, and he is well-represented here.

I'm not a fan of the early eighties episodes (I'm 23 years old, so I've only seen this decade in reruns), but I could sit and watch the later seasons of the eighties forever. It was actually quite painful at times to watch the clip show of the earlier years--this must have been embarrassing for those involved. You can't blame them for why it was bad--the acting is only as good as the writing effort, and that seemed fairly lackluster. I was cringing at those clips, and I have never had involvement with the show other than being a dedicated fan. It was almost a fresh breath of air to see what the show became as it transitioned in the mid to late eighties, as new faces emerged, and characters became memorable. It's sad though--the cast-proclaimed "glue" that held his cast together and helped save the show--Phil Hartman--died so tragically and did not get the opportunity to participate in what was the come. He would have probably had a lot of nice things to say, but his cast mates represented him well, they made sure to mention his significance.

This was a really well-done special, and a great follow up to "Live from New York: The First 5 Years of Saturday Night Live." I hope this will be released on DVD soon--I own the first 5 Years DVD, and would definitely like to see this one on DVD--it is a great special, even if the earlier years are hard to watch.

5 out of 5 people found the following review useful:
Funny...trashy, but funny, 25 October 2005
7/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Before I write this interview, I wanted to just explain that I have been a Dennis Miller fan since I was 11 (1994), and he was the only reason I saw this movie. I also think he was one of the aspects of this movie that held redeeming value. In addition, purchased it new for less than $10 a few years ago, and it is in my Halloween movie collection. With that out of the way, I'll start my review.

Vampress Lilith (Angie Everhart) is brought to life again after a long rest in one of the far corners of the world by Reverend Jimmy Current (Chris Sarandon) and his partner Vincent. The two establish a bordello disguised as a funeral home to attract "evil" local young men. The men can "get stiff among the stiffs," but men start disappearing. This disappearance of local young men hits close to home for Katherine Verdoux(Erika Eleniak) when her rebellious younger brother Caleb (Corey Feldman) goes missing. So, she hires a Rafe Guttman (Dennis Miller) a wisecracking, seedy private investigator with good intentions and a quite unusual case--all involving this mortuary with secrets. Rafe and Katherine put themselves into a mystery that crosses the boundary of the living and the dead--rather, the undead.

This movie, thought quite funny, is a bad movie. That's just how it is. Going into this movie, the title itself is an indication of how trashy or bad it really is. But man, is it a fun trip! I found myself laughing at pretty much all the right scenes and all the right lines. Its as though the lines are tailored for Miller himself, it is perfect shtick for him. Most of the movies he's been in had parts written especially for him, but this was perfect. My first impression of Rafe is that he's a jerk, but I discovered (rather quickly) that he is rather good-natured and good-intentioned, and that he truly wants to help Katherine out.

There are two scenes I absolutely loathed about this movie--the scene where Lilith encounters Rafe in his office (I turn the channel off or fast-forward the tape), and the opening scene of the movie where Lilith is discovered by Rev. Current and Vincent (this is only watchable once). Otherwise, this movie is quite funny and interesting if you plan on getting into it. My biggest beef (spoiler) is that we don't even meet our hero until roughly 20 minutes into the movie! When you're first billed, doesn't this mean you'll show up earlier in the film? I guess someone missed one of the most important parts of film-making, or at least credit order. But, its OK, really, it's not the worst thing about the film.

This is essentially a bad movie. I read another review that says that it seems Dennis Miller is letting the viewers know this. He sure is! This is one of those so-bad-it's-funny kind of movies (why it used to be in the horror section of the video store I have no idea). However, Dennis Miller is hysterical in it!! I loved his moments--he had a lot of good ones.

I liked when he goes to the "Cunningham wake," and watches as the men lift the coffin out of the room, but struggle with it. Guttman, observing the scene, says "Wow, she really was a heavyweight." He does make some of the most classically bad facial expressions I have witnessed in a long time (honestly, after seeing this, I want to know what acting school I have to go to just to learn to "Act the Dennis Miller Way"). My favorite scenes are the Super Soaker scene (I won't divulge on this too much, not to spoil it, but it is a classic scene not to me missed), the scene where he sneaks back into the mortuary to investigate, and when Rafe heads into the coffin drop to visit the Bordello.

So why 7 out of 10 stars? One point deducted for the opening scene, which tends to be long and drawn-out. Watch this once, and you'll understand what is going on. What redeems this film is that after this point in the film, it becomes better, and the plot begins to move a little. One the same point, the entire first twenty minutes of the film is a complete drag. Skip the introduction on the next viewing. Another point deducted for the scene where Lilith encounters Rafe in his office--this scene is just a complete turn-off to me (2, 4, 6, 8--You can watch me masturbate!--yuck). And a third point deducted for the nudity. Yes, I know, it's a bordello, yes, they're supposed to be nude. But, I 'm a female, and I don't take pleasure in watching naked women prance around. But, I'm flexible, so I pushed past that dislike and ignored it. The bad acting isn't even a negative--it adds to the movie's silly nature.

This is a great Halloween movie, but non-Dennis Miller fans may be turned off by it. Maybe not, I don't know. The acting is pretty bad, but that's the point--it's not Oscar-caliber material. I highly recommend this movie--it has its moments that make is memorable (probably not for all the right reasons, but it tries). Some classic scenes make it funny, and you just may watch it more than once (I have!). Just try not to read too much into it. It really is quite an enjoyable diversion.

1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
Awesome!!, 16 September 2005
10/10

This special was supposed to be a lead-in to the new millennium, who better to bring HBO into the year 2000 than Dennis Miller, one of HBO's most popular stars of the time (and likely still is).

This wasn't a conventional stand-up routine, as I was expecting. Rather, it was an hour-long "Dennis Miller Live"...set over 1000 years. Viewers get to watch Miller perform his show in different years, ranting on topics of the period, like, for example, the Bubonic Plague. Miller's guest each time is Norm MacDonald, also clad in period clothes. Miller starts the show in the present (1999), and the show goes from there. He does his current events, his rant, and his guest. I don't remember if he did the Big Screen (or some variation of it).

This was a really funny show, and Dennis Miller does a great job. His sarcastic wit and giggle were what made me laugh. He was the bright spot of the show (for more obvious reasons). The use of Norm MacDonald wasn't necessary--Dana Carvey would have been of much better use. MacDonald is funny, but one tends to get tired of him after awhile. You can only go so far saying "uhhh" a lot. I know not everyone would agree, but they could have done without him.

I really liked this special, as it was funny and insightful. I highly recommend seeing it if you can find it. I trashed my tape of this, unknowingly, and I'm still crushed. Eventually this one will have to be released on DVD.

Of course, that's just my opinion, and I could be wrong.

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
Funny...this is how I remember Garfield (may include spoilers), 20 July 2004

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

As a child of the 80s, I grew up on the Garfield of the mid-80s-mid 90s: the Christmas special, "Garfield and Friends," and the like. I never saw this special before, and after seeing it, I knew this was Garfield as I know and love him.

This special is featured as the third episode on the DVD "Garfield as Himself." I took home the DVD from my video store job to watch the weekend before it came out. I watch it at work on Saturdays, and this one always cracks me up.

Jon Arbuckle needs a life. His days are filled with invigorating tasks like counting ceiling tiles and organizing the sock drawer. So he tries several approaches to meeting women--renting at a video, doing laundry at the laundromat, going to the beach ("I can't seem to find my muscles!"), and even going dancing to DISCO music. All fails, and he takes Garfield to a self-help group for people without lives, run my Lorenzo, a guy who sounds like a televangelist on TV, and a little timid man in person. There, he meets Mona, and actually gets a life, while Garfield...well, doesn't.

This special is pretty funny. I have only seen several other Garfield specials--the Christmas one, Garfield On the Town, and Here Comes Garfield (both are also on the DVD), plus I watched the cartoon series non-stop for 7 years (and in reruns now). At 21, I find the humor to be quite refreshing and silly. Garfield is sarcastic, and his point of view is classic. I love the voice--Lorenzo Music is so hard to compete with. It's a shame he isn't around to have done the voice for the movie (which I still haven't seen yet!). I think what makes this work is the animation--it has the best animation of the DVD specials. The other two look like Peanuts specials from the 1970s (same producers from the Peanuts cartoons on the two other DVD specials). Not that its a bad thing, but the animation certainly took a huge overhaul.

My favorite parts are the disco scene ("Wave your paws/Shake your tail"), where Jon finds out that disco died ("What? When?"), the self-help group session when Garfield gets paired up with a loser, and Garfield clinging to the back of the car window in a parody of the famous suction-cup plushes from the 80s. Remember those? But for me, the topper was the laundromat, where Jon hits on a woman by saying about her panties "I couldn't help but notice your little frilly thingy. Are you a ballerina?" and the woman says sarcastically "Why yes I am. I couldn't help but notice the teddy bears on your boxers. Are you a dweeb?" while Garfield smiles and says sarcastically "Why, yes he is!" Classic!!!

This is a good special. I highly recommend picking up "Garfield as Himself" on DVD to see it (it will probably be the only place its available, if only to rent. It's a cute diversion, and I think its worth every moment. It certainly helped me feel better!

26 out of 31 people found the following review useful:
Excellent, high quality program, 10 November 2003

Television itself is a barren wasteland of programming upon the ushering in of each new fall season. So many choices, each one with less and less quality to them. Hence, there is one show that pushed past this.

"Joan of Arcadia" is about 16-year old Joan Girardi (20-year old Amber Tamblyn), who is visited by beautiful stranger who calls himself "God." He tells her that because he let her wheelchair-bound brother Kevin (hottie Jason Ritter) survive a car crash that paralyzed him, Joan has to listen to him. Each week, he has her do something new (hold a yard sale, get a job, try out for cheerleading, take AP Chem). It's a weird world out there, and Joan's just got a little weirder.

I remember CBS rolling out the commercials for this program in July, and I was fascinated immediately. I knew I was compelled to watch this show, since I wanted to try to get into shows geared toward my age brackett (the elusive 18-25 group--I'm 21). Joan herself is completely relatable to myself (I wrote an essay on her for a college course 1 1/2 months ago--I got an A). I see that sarcastic personality in her that I had in high school. She's just trying to survive there--that's what I did.

My favorite episode was when Joan was told by God to try out for cheerleading. That cheer at the end was priceless. I was laughing and clapping. Jason Ritter (the son of late legendary John Ritter) is great as Kevin. I really think he's hot, and he reminds me so much of his dad. Thankfully, Jason will carry on the name. As Joan's parents, Joe Montenga and Mary Steenburgen are wonderful--they're like everyone's parents, and aren't most just slightly neurotic??? Absolutely. Michael Welch, as Luke Girardi, reminds me of a young Anthony Michael Hall that I came to know in the Brat Pack movies I fell in love with in the late '90s when I was a love-struck teenager in high school. I know, it wasn't THAT long ago, but still...

All in all, this is quality programming. If CBS knows what they're doing (and what's good for them) they'll keep this show on the air. This is good for whether you're religious or non-religious (I'm non-religious). I'm so glad a program this high-caliber came along. People need shows with a little faith. This is the one!

4 out of 6 people found the following review useful:
Excellent, high quality program, 10 November 2003

Television itself is a barren wasteland of programming upon the ushering in of each new fall season. So many choices, each one with less and less quality to them. Hence, there is one show that pushed past this.

"Joan of Arcadia" is about 16-year old Joan Girardi (20-year old Amber Tamblyn), who is visited by beautiful stranger who calls himself "God." He tells her that because he let her wheelchair-bound brother Kevin (hottie Jason Ritter) survive a car crash that paralyzed him, Joan has to listen to him. Each week, he has her do something new (hold a yard sale, get a job, try out for cheerleading, take AP Chem). It's a weird world out there, and Joan's just got a little weirder.

I remember CBS rolling out the commercials for this program in July, and I was fascinated immediately. I knew I was compelled to watch this show, since I wanted to try to get into shows geared toward my age brackett (the elusive 18-25 group--I'm 21). Joan herself is completely relatable to myself (I wrote an essay on her for a college course 1 1/2 months ago--I got an A). I see that sarcastic personality in her that I had in high school. She's just trying to survive there--that's what I did.

My favorite episode was when Joan was told by God to try out for cheerleading. That cheer at the end was priceless. I was laughing and clapping. Jason Ritter (the son of late legendary John Ritter) is great as Kevin. I really think he's hot, and he reminds me so much of his dad. Thankfully, Jason will carry on the name. As Joan's parents, Joe Montenga and Mary Steenburgen are wonderful--they're like everyone's parents, and aren't most just slightly neurotic??? Absolutely. Michael Welch, as Luke Girardi, reminds me of a young Anthony Michael Hall that I came to know in the Brat Pack movies I fell in love with in the late '90s when I was a love-struck teenager in high school. I know, it wasn't THAT long ago, but still...

All in all, this is quality programming. If CBS knows what they're doing (and what's good for them) they'll keep this show on the air. This is good for whether you're religious or non-religious (I'm non-religious). I'm so glad a program this high-caliber came along. People need shows with a little faith. This is the one!

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
Shocking, thought-provoking, 7 August 2003

Quite frankly, I was only semi-curious about seeing this documentary, mainly because of my utter disgust for Michael Moore, who protested the very war I was supporting (I'm supporting my President, I don't know what he was thinking). But, after finding out that it was a good idea to see it because of my disliking of the 2nd Ammendment and the National Rifle Association, I gave it a shot. I'm glad I did.

Documentarian Michael Moore poses the question: "Are we a nation of gun nuts, or are we just plain nuts?" as he explores the issues behind the NRA and the 2nd Ammendment, and the connection between gun-craziness and the Columbine High School massacre in April 1999. He interviews several people from Littleton, Colorado, meets with Charlton Heston, and presents shocking statistics about gun deaths and the history of dictators, and much more.

Much of this documentary was startling--especially the statistics. Over 11 thousand gun deaths in the United States last year, compared to 39 deaths in China, and significantly lower deaths in other countries? Scary!!!! The footage of dictators to the song "What a Wonderful World" with the final image of the segment being the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks was startling at best. However, the lighter fare that "A Brief History of the United States" (I swear, I was hysterical laughing during this segment) is great. It's a short, badly drawn cartoon that depicts the history of our nation in a short, cut-and-dry manner, complete with the patriot with a southern accent stating "I loves my gun! LOVES MY GUN!" was priceless.

I'm a conservative Republican, and there is a major misconception among people who don't have much knoweledge of the political system that Republicans swear by the NRA. Wrong. I don't like the NRA, and many of the Republicans I know don't like the NRA either.

The images I won't soon forget were of the poor Flint, Michigan neighborhoods, the footage of the massacre at Columbine, the picture of 6-year old school shooting victim Kayla Rowland, and the footage of the the evil Charlton Heston shouting "From my cold dead hand!"

I work in a video store, and was able to obtain a demo copy of "Bowling for Columbine," which won't be on video or DVD until August 19, 2003. My boss saw the movie and told me that because of my political beliefs, I would need to see this movie. I'm REALLY glad I did, as I now appreciate the genius that is Michael Moore, even if I don't completely agree with him protesting the war.

I highly recommend renting or buying this when it is released on video and DVD, so everyone can see that we are truly a nation that loves our guns--LOVES OUR GUNS! Sorry, I had to throw that in.

7 out of 7 people found the following review useful:
Great show!, 23 July 2003

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Although this program was very short-lived, it will always hold a fond place in my heart. I'm not really one for African-American sitcoms, but this show was hysterical!

"My Brother and Me"'s main focuses are 12-year old Alfie and 8-year old Dee Dee Parker (Arthur Reggie III and Ralph Woodfolk IV) are brothers living in suburban Charlotte, North Carolina with their mom and dad, Jennifer and Roger (Karen Fraction and Jim Coleman), and their 14-year old sister Melanie (Aisling Sistrunk). Alfie has a friend, Milton, whose famously known as "Goo" (my brother and I found this hysterical!!!), Dee Dee has friends in "token white character" Harry, and annoying Donnell, and Melanie's best friend is fellow cheerleader Dionne, Goo's archnemesis. Goo hits on Melanie, she rejects him, Goo and Alfie hang out at "Comics and Books," and at the end of each episode all problems are solved, much like your typical sitcom, Nickelodeon style. Good clean fun.

It is beyond me why anyone hates this show. My brother and I used to make it a routine to watch this show every Sunday night. It was on at 7:30 every Sunday night for two years (from the time we were in 6th grade until 8th grade), and we always watched it before "The Simpsons." It was great!! It was such a funny sitcom. The father was hysterical!! We always laughed at his jokes, no matter how pathetic they really were. Every time he said "Now that's what I'm talking about," we'd die laughing!!!! His stories were so bad, the family always tried to escape from hearing them. Great concept.

My favorite episode, and the one I remember the best, (for obvious reasons) was when Dee Dee wanted the "Cool Doctor Money" haircut, with the dollar signs everywhere. Since Roger won't take him to get it cut, Goo, the genius that he is, offers to cut it. Of course, it was god-awful!!!!! My brother and I found that funny, until Roger took him to the barber, and Dee Dee came back with a SHAVED head!! That did it--we were practically crying at that point!!!!

This was a great sitcom that should have lasted longer. I wish more people gave it a chance--it was so cute and funny!!!!! Sure, it's cheesy and Nickelodeon-esque (After all, it did air on the "first network for kids") but it was harmless, good clean fun. It still holds a place in my heart.

Dying to Live (1999) (TV)
3 out of 3 people found the following review useful:
Upsetting, but an overall excellent film, 25 June 2003

This formula plays like a "been there, done that" deal. Teen Angel/Posthumus Revenge is not new to the film industry. But, that doesn't always mean that previous efforts were always the best ones. That's where this little gem comes in.

"Dying To Live," a 1999 Made-for-TV/Cable film, is about a aspiring marine biologist named Rachel Linden (Hayley DuMond) who has the world on a string--a great boyfriend in high school swim team star Matthew Jannett (Gabriel Mann), and a good friend in cute and sassy Leslie Chambers (Linda Cardellini), who has a heart arythmia and says that she could die at any time. Enter Vanessa Cannington (Shannon Elizabeth), Matthew's jealous ex-girlfriend, who wants Matt back, and will stop at nothing. She spikes his punch with a strong tranquilizer at a school dance, and he takes Rachel outside to the pool. He begins to get disoriented, and plunges off the diving board. Rachel, in a valiant attempt to save him, stumbles on a ladder and bangs her head on it. She falls into the pool and drowns. Matt is so disoriented that he cannot speak, let alone save Rachel. He is hospitalized, but later arrested for killing his girlfriend. Rachel then steps out of her dead body at the funeral and wonders why everyone is crying, not realizing she is dead. A mysterious man named Will (Jonathan Frakes), who is a gaurdian angel, informs Rachel that she must expose her killer to the world so she can go to her eternal life. Rachel wants to live, but must rely on a mutual soul (one that both she and Matthew could trust) to expose the truth. Along comes unsuspecting Leslie. Rachel must use Leslie's body to expose the truth, even though it means risking Leslie's fragile condition. Can Rachel accomplish her task?

This movie was truly upsetting, but I really enjoyed it. It didn't try too hard to be overburdening--it didn't need to. It moved at an even pace, and the story was well-written. I only saw this the other night on the Sci-Fi Channel. The only real problem I had with this movie was how long it took for Rachel to begin trying to expose her killer. It took some stretch of time for any action to begin. But, maybe that was a good thing--the action was forthcoming and excellent. I like how Rachel would temporarily "occupy" Leslie's body to get her point across. Linda Cardellini had so much expression on her face, and she is quickly becoming one of my favorite actresses and role models. Hayley DuMond put on an excellent performance, and I could certainly relate to her character. If something happened to me that cut me off too soon, I would want to expose the truth behind it. Gabriel Mann, who I only just found out was Freddie Prinze Jr.'s friend Auggie in "Summer Catch," was also excellent as Matthew Jannet, who just wanted to prove to the world that he would never have killed Rachel. It was another so-so performance for Shannon Elizabeth, who aggravated me very much (but that was probably the point--you wanted to hate her). Jonathan Frakes was decent as Will, and who he really is will shock you at the end.

Ok, favorite scenes: The scene where Rachel first occpies Leslie, and when Leslie looks in the mirror, she sees Rachel and backs up. I think Cardellini has great expression, as I've mentioned earlier. I also enjoyed the scene where the teens were having a good time in the pool earlier in the film, the scenes that Rachel tries to get Vanessa exposed, and the pivotal scene where Leslie, as Rachel, finds the evidence in the bleachers. I won't give away much about this, or the end, because that is my absolute favorite part, and I couldn't spoil it for anyone. That's not my reviewing style.

Anyways, long story short, this is a well-done, well-acted, nice telepic. Just some light fare, nothing bad and certainly harmless enough. The stars are great, and I will definitely enjoy the copy I made of this movie the other night. If you get the chance, PLEASE see this film. You will enjoy it, and certainly not regret it!

8 out of 13 people found the following review useful:
Excellent film, 6 June 2003

I'm not one for the movie-of-the-week genre, but this film was surprisingly good, and it's not only for the reason that Freddie Prinze Jr. is one of my favorie actors.

Shortly before Christmas, Jason Copeland (Rick Schroeder) decides to take out his pent-up revenge on Johnson High School, which he failed out of a year earlier. He enters the school heavily armed and begins firing shots, with no intention to kill anyone, and takes 80 students hostage in the music room. One of them Aaron Sullivan, is a troubled student, much like Jason, who soon becomes the middleman to Jason and makeshift hostage negotiator/small town cop/unlikely hero Skip Fine (Henry Winkler, in one of his many great performances). Aaron must speak to Skip on the phone, explain Jason's demands, and keep his classmates alive. He'll be a hero if he can accomplish these tasks, but can Skip help him to break through to Jason?

The performances in this film are exceptional for a TV-movie. At times, I found myself huddling up, especially the part when Jason puts the gun to a crying Samantha's (Katie Wright) head. He forces lookouts into the hallway, and insists that a cop entering the school or a student fleeing will result in bloodshed. I was so scared every time a student fled going to the bathroom. I was particularly freaked out when Darren, the sole African-American student, was killed being selfless by protecting a classmate. My heart skipped a beat as his determined, hysterical mother tried to find out of Darren was alive. We also saw glimpses of Aaron's scared mother, hoping that her son stays one step ahead of Jason to keep himself and his classmates alive. Freddie Prinze Jr. puts on an incredible performance, and looked so young (he still does). He was only about 20 years old then (my age), and I'm glad a better hairstyle was forthcoming for him. Henry Winkler is a great actor, and he's just the kind of unlikely hero you'd expect. In my opinion, casting on his part was a great decision.

If you like true-life dramas (this was based on reality), and like to see an unlikely individual prevail, then this is a great movie for you. It's well-written and smart, and you'll be left cheering for Prinze and Winkler. Rick Schroeder also puts on a great performance, and can scare and shake up the most unnerved person (myself included). If you can find this movie at your video store, definitely pick it up.


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