Reviews written by registered user
svbell

7 reviews in total 
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1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
Not the average low-budget independent flick!, 17 June 2005
8/10

This film took me by surprise - I confess I was expecting yet another low-budget-low-interest indie flick, but Kisses & Caroms doesn't fall in such category.

This independent gem tells the story of a girl who setup a threesome with her ex to show him she's still the best. Perfect excuse to make a sex film, right? Well don't worry it goes far beyond that, and the film explores with humor and no boundaries men vs. women somewhat tumultuous relationships.

The cast deliver an outstanding performance, making their characters to be believable, and thanks to well-written dialogs and effective storytelling, Kisses & Caroms is a pleasure to watch. Add to this a great production value, sexy babes - including cult icon Ginger Lynn Allen - and topped with a great score, all this will make you wonder if the film is truly a low-budget production... Kisses and Caroms is guaranteed to keep you away from the Fast Forward button of your remote control.

Weird movie, but excellent documentary, 16 June 2004
9/10

If you've ever seen this french, made-in-Canada movie, you know what I mean. Basically a documentary on Canadian and European comics and graphic novels authors, disguised as some thriller / comedy as Jean-Louis Milette plays a villain who wants to conquer the world, and by asking private eye Michel Rivard to investigate the comic art industry and its influence on the civilization, Mr. Zolock tries to compute the collected data and find a way to rule the world.

But this film IS a documentary. It runs for around 70 minutes, and I'd say 98% of the film is composed of interviews of European masters of the 70s and 80s. Some interviews are conducted in public areas, while many of them are right in the artist's studios, so we can enjoy seeing them at work.

The list of the visited artists is too long to be mentioned here in full, but these include Yves Got, Enki Bilal, Jean Giraud / Moebius, Jacques Tardi, Albert Uderzo, Hugo Pratt, Gotlib, Franquin, Philippe Druillet, Reiser, and J-C. Mezieres. It is very interesting to have the insight view of each of these folks about their own work. To know what they really think about the graphic novel market, some surprising numbers when talking about sales (as long as we put them back in context in 1983), and what they think about what makes an adult comic or a kid's comic.

Definitively worth watching, just for the enjoyment to see these masters in their creative environment. There is a number of comic-related movies made in the US, but as far as I know, this one is the only film dealing with European artists.

sv

Cheesy, creepy, lame and entertaining!!, 27 January 2002

I have seen this giant spider movie when I was a kid, and boy did it scared me back then! I have been lucky enough to find a former rental recently, and after sending big bucks to the seller, I thought that maybe, after all those years, I would find it's absolutely crap and not worth the $50 I just sent. As a matter of fact, when I got the tape I did found it is crap, yet strangely it is as creepy as it was when I saw it decades ago. Characters are poor, but funny. Dialogs are pointless, but they fit the characters. Special effects are lame, but music and sound renders the images quite effective. So bottomline, even at $50, I definately do not regret this purchase, and the movie sits in a very good position on my video shelves. Furthermore: I am looking forward to have, hopefully, one day, a clean DVD release of that superb B garbage!

10 out of 23 people found the following review useful:
The greatest horror movie about the coolest horror topic!, 11 August 2001
10/10

Yes, tales of The Bermuda Triangle terrifies many people, and this movie isn't going to calm their fears.

A stunning work by great director Rene Cardona Jr. who managed to keep a disturbing mood all the film long, from the first minute of disappearing USAF jets, to the last one, with the closing credits showing a list of hundreds of planes / ships who vanished in the Triangle. Unforgettable. Eerie music score adds a lot to the chilling atmosphere, and the use of an apparently inofensive doll can drive your kids afraid of their own toys if they dare to watch this flick (I certainly do not recommend it to kids, all the people I know of that saw Il Triangolo Delle Bermuda told me they hade many nightmares, and so do I...) Rene Cardona don't need any hysterical screams, bloodbath, or giant monsters from the deep, he has this rare talent of being able to bring up such pure psychological horror.

Very hard to find on tape, I sincerly hope it will be available one day on VHS or DVD.

1 out of 3 people found the following review useful:
Simply the best movie I have ever seen!, 1 August 2001
10/10

Yes, I have yet to see something more impressive than I Bury The Living. Outstanding performance by Richard Boone. Spectacular cinematography, extremely creepy, and one of the best music score I have heard. You can read about the movie's plot, I swear you'll never see the end coming, and this is very rare in a movie. Finally, I will say that this movie is the only one I have seen over 30 times - no kidding - and I still enjoy it quite a lot!!! -sv

Malpertuis (1971)
5 out of 12 people found the following review useful:
We wish Harry Kumel has done more horror movies!, 1 August 2001

Yes, Malpertuis is extremely impressive, in my opinion the best Euro-horror movie! I read the Jean Ray book - which is by far my favorite horror writer - and the adaptation by Harry Kumel, altough not extremely tight to the novel, is quite decent.

Sadly, this movie is nearly impossible to find...

Death Ship (1980)
1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
A tasty cheese of steel, 1 August 2001

Very underrated movie. Far from being the best horror flick ever made, this piece still deserves a place in any horror movie fan's shelves. Great performance by Richard Crenna and George Kennedy, there's a very strange and disturbing mood from the very first minute to the last one. Some shots are also _very_ scary, thanks to the use of blood red images and the hysterical screams bathing the nightmarish scenes. This film drags a reputation of very bad schlock: at some point the producers seems to have lost the soundtrack, so you see actors speak with no sound, while the music goes on, and the weird use of mismatched stock footage, you'll swear only Ed Wood can use stock footage that way! Anyway, you have to give a chance to the flick, get your hands on it if you see it somewhere, this is quite a great midnight chiller. -sv