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349th Heavy Weapons Crew

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12 reviews in total 
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Rollerball (1975)
2 out of 3 people found the following review useful:
Fabulous Wide Screen Version, 22 July 2000

I saw Rollerball when it first hit the theaters, believed Director's Jewison's warning about corporate world take-over, and was engrossed by the action. When it was first shown on network television I was greatly disappointed with the 'full-screen' version. Today television history was made when Turner Classic Movies aired Rollerball's original theatrical, wide-screen version. This is what I waited 25 years to see. It exceeded my every expectation. A great movie with a relevant social messsage that is being borne out today before our very eyes.

8 out of 10 people found the following review useful:
Proves the old adage, "you are as sick as your secrets.", 23 June 2000
8/10

Good World War II romantic drama with excellent performances by Ginger Rogers, Joseph Cotton and 16-year old Shirley Temple.

"I'll Be Seeing You" looks at the effects of a kind of `battle fatigue' known then as "old sergeant's syndrome". This particular form of post-traumatic stress occurred in battle-seasoned noncommissioned officers. After a dreadful encounter with someone's guard dog Sgt. Zachary Morgan, on leave from an Army mental hospital, experiences a very realistic and dramatically effective "flash back". Through judicious camera editing you see Joseph Cotton affect the appropriate 'sweat response', as his forehead, chest, shoulders and armpits become progressively more sweat-drenched. Very realistic!

This movie also subtly delivers the message that none of us are perfect and that open-mindedness and compassion are virtues called for under difficult circumstances.

Gunga Din (1939)
8 out of 22 people found the following review useful:
Once idolized, now despised., 11 June 2000
5/10

As a teen in the 60s I idolized this film. Cary Grant and Douglas Fairbanks Jr. were my idols far more than many of the then current crop of young movie and TV idols, and the British could do no wrong. Everything about this movie seemed first rate for me and so it was with great enthusiasm that I watched Gunga Din this morning – the first time in decades. Now however I find its caricature of India's dedicated freedom fighters, the Kali-devoted thugees, just as sickening and racist as its simpleminded characterization of Gunga Din.

Throwing a little reality into all that has been said about Gunga Din, thugees were more akin to the French Resistance fighters of German Occupied France during WWII. Thugees did indeed kill thousands of Indians during their struggle to oust the British, but those deaths were actually the execution of those who collaborators with the foreign invader.

As much as I would like to continue to cherish this old classic for "old times sake", I am forced to conclude (and this isn't an exact quote): that when I was a child I spoke as a child and thought as a child, but when I grew up I had to put away childish things.

6 out of 10 people found the following review useful:
Frankie's performance couldn't be reviewed!, 7 June 2000

Back in 1944 movie critics weren't given special screenings in order to review soon to be released films, but had to wait for a movie's regular opening to write their reviews. According to the host of American Movie Classics, when "Higher and Higher" first opened, film critics were unable to review Frank Sinatra's performance because the screams of adulation from the overwhelmingly young female audience drowned out all sound.

The first time I ever saw/heard Frank Sinatra was in the late 1960s and I couldn't understand why the women of my mother's generation made such a fuss about Mr. Sinatra. But after seeing this sensual and romantic crooner in "Higher and Higher" I can easily grasp why thousands of young women slept in the streets in order to be the first on line to see the young and appealing Mr. Sinatra.

28 out of 37 people found the following review useful:
Worthy of Hitchcock's Finest., 7 June 2000
9/10

The musical score is worthy of Hitchcock's Finest thrillers and is part of what raises this "On Dangerous Ground" to the level of classic film noir. In fact, one might say that it stands on its own as one of the movie's characters - that, plus strong direction and stunning photography with unusual close-ups. For example, the opening shot shows a WOMAN picking up a shoulder holster with a gun in it. Is she some one's long-time gun moll? Is this movie about her?

"On Dangerous Ground" surprises you again and again with its many plot twists and excellent, though sometimes frightening characterizations. Mr. Ryan's character purposely lacks the charm exhibited by tough, film noir leading men like those portrayed by Dick Powell, Humphrey Bogart and Robert Mitchum. And Detective Jim Wilson (Robert Ryan) is just too brutal for the audience to admire.

Ida Lupino doesn't come onto the scene until about 37 minutes into the movie. Ms. Lupino takes what could easily be a one-dimensional supporting role, normally given to a second rate actress, and turns Mary Malden into an intelligent, sensitive and complex character.

Ward Bond, the always-competent supporting actor, is excellent as the avenging father. He is so blinded by his loss and rage that he repeatedly misses important clues that are right before his own eyes. Like Mary's blindness, or a critically important fact about the murderer.

6 out of 14 people found the following review useful:
Vic Morrow's showdown will hold you spellbound!, 31 May 2000
9/10

You simply must see Vic's riveting portrayal as the young disillusioned, but still proud Lars Peterson stands up to a cruel and ruthless land baron. Vic has the pivotal role of this top-rated James Cagney western. Vic's show down with Cagney will hold you spellbound!

16 out of 19 people found the following review useful:
Taken from the files of the FBI, 26 May 2000
7/10

According to the host of "Turner Classic Movies", this movie is based on F.B.I. files. I also learned that the theatrical release of "Confessions of a Nazi Spy" almost resulted an international incident that might have caused America's premature entrance into World War II, two years before the 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. I've seen documentaries about the activities of the German-American Bundt and can tell you that this movie has the frightening ring of authenticity. Well worth seeing if you can't get a hold of documentaries on the subject.

22 out of 22 people found the following review useful:
Better named, "Hope for Millions"!, 25 May 2000
8/10

I saw "Music for Millions" right before Memorial Day. This beautiful WWII movie must have been a wonderful gift of hope to American G.I. wives and sweethearts. It leaves nothing unsaid about the powerlessness and fear many of these women must have felt. Yet it is also an inspiring testimonial about hope. Hope, prayer, and faith as embodied by one tenacious six-year old girl.

Although you'll cry aplenty, this is more than a '4-hankie' drama. Jimmy Durante, with his famous 'snozzoola' and comic skits, provides a wonderfully humorous contrast to the inspiring classical concertos played by the world-renown Jose Iturbi. You'll be left breathless while the famous conductor/pianist fills the air with the incredibly beautiful music of his mostly female orchestra, bringing a different kind of hope and joy to our boys in uniform.

This movie is an absolute MUST!

6 out of 8 people found the following review useful:
Can her money get her the married man she loves?, 16 May 2000
6/10

I enjoyed watching the web of intrigue unfold as a young New Orleans lady in the late 1800's attempts to use her inheritance to regain the man she loves. But there are others who are and have been plotting both for and against her, and her plans go awry. I eagerly watched to learn if the man she loved would suffer for her machinations, or if she would risk her societal position to save him. Unfortunately the ending left me cold, with too many questions left unanswered and with the feeling that Robert Mitchum was miscast in the role of the doctor she loves.

20 out of 24 people found the following review useful:
Can her money get her the married man she loves?, 16 May 2000
6/10

I enjoyed watching the web of intrigue unfold as a young New Orleans lady in the late 1800's attempts to use her inheritance to regain the man she loves. But there are others who are and have been plotting both for and against her, and her plans go awry. I eagerly watched to learn if the man she loved would suffer for her machinations, or if she would risk her societal position to save him. Unfortunately the ending left me cold, with too many questions left unanswered and with the feeling that Robert Mitchum was miscast in the role of the doctor she loves.


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