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Cellguy

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2 reviews in total 
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7 out of 11 people found the following review useful:
Light-weight no doubt, but not as bad as some say, 31 January 2009
9/10

OK, so there was no gratuitous sex in this coming out story. And too, there wasn't even any male on male kissing. If that's what you're looking for it can be found abundantly in some other coming out stories like Beautiful Thing and Edge of Seventeen (both of which I highly recommend). To me this story WAS sweet, and pleasantly so. It was kind of like a Norwegian after-school special--Remember those from the 1970s?

So I'll grant that it wasn't overly realistic. But at least it did provide a positive resolution. That's something many a gay teen in the 80s didn't think was remotely possible. In essence it was a squeaky clean feel good take on coming out. I'm sure there have been at least a few of those in the past and likely more and more up to the present.

So to sum up, in my opinion Sebastian is not nearly as bad as some would have you think. It's nothing deep, nothing profound--but still enjoyable in my book...There's definitely some fun 80s kitsch going on too!

4 out of 5 people found the following review useful:
An excellent introduction to a vital literary movement., 28 February 2001
9/10

The documentary Beat Generation: An American Dream provides an excellent introduction to an extremely vital and influential 20th century literary movement. Most of the key players are featured either through interviews or archival footage. News reels, propaganda, and pop culture film footage from the 40s and 50s (rife with the superficiality peculiar to that era) provide stark contrast to the free spirited ideals set forth by the key Beat exponents.

Some of the most compelling moments of the film were the segments featuring the writers reading from their works. It doesn't get any better than Jack Kerouac expressively reading from _On The Road_ while Steve Allen effortlessly accompanies him on piano. Just as moving was the excerpt of Allan Ginsberg's furious reading of _Howl_ and his sad and poignant recollection of his beloved mother.

Of course there is no better way to learn about the Beat writers than to actually read their works. But, if it's a film introduction you want, this is the one to watch.