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koop-2

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16 reviews in total 
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Cube (1997)
1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
Interesting concept, disappointing result, 5 May 2001

Although my hopes were not that high I was disappointed with Cube. I would have hoped that a Canadian film would have more originality in its performance than an American. But that is not the case here. The actors with the exceptions of the two who plays Worth and Kazan are surprisingly bad! But then, the material they work with is not making things easier for them - the dialogue is sometimes embarrassing. I was surprised when I read that the film only was only 90 minutes long, it feels much longer, but in favor for the film it's actually not THAT boring.

One can only fantasize how much better this film would have been in the hands of a director like David Cronenberg. Plus another cast and the occasional rewrite.

A definition of The End of Violence, 20 October 1999
7/10

The End of Violence. Define it. Well, I'll try... Ciby 2000. The late 1990's. Irony. Satire. Subplotting. I could go on, but I won't.

The casting scared me at first, Pullman, Byrne, MacDowell. Not exactly a dream team for me. More like the other way around. But, they work surprisingly good portraying these characters.

The story is complex. And the subplots are many. And most of them both unusual and interesting. The dialogue is smart and often very funny, but not in the punchline-laugh-here kind of way. More like the punchline-by-the-way-smile kind of way.

The End of Violence is not at all as pretentious as its title. De facto, compared to Wenders' Der Himmel über Berlin it is down to earth. But neither is it near the masterwork of Paris, Texas. But The End of Violence is better than its reputation. And the overall casting is very successful. Particularly I think Loren Dean and Traci Lind stand out. They both deliver some great ironic lines and the super cool Lind acts in a film in the film (where the director is played by Udo Kier) in which The End of Violence makes fun of itself in general and Hollywood and the whole American movie industry in particular.

The End of Violence works better as a satirical film than a big-brother-is-watching-us and the-government-is-after-us film. They just seem to can't get those right, can they? But there are too many already, that is even if you don't count The X Files.

6 out of 10 people found the following review useful:
An interesting dilemma, 11 October 1999

"Just because you f***ed some junkie in a street corner doesn't make you his mother!" / dialogue from Losing Isaiah.

The film starts with a drug addict (Halle Berry, who is surprisingly good.) goes around in one of Americas less glamorous blocks with a screaming baby. But the withdrawal symptoms becomes to strong and she lies the child in a container. When she wakes up the next day she can't find Isaiah. She is devastated. (Isaiah has been taken to the hospital when a couple of dust men found him.)

Jessica Lange, Hollywood's best actress, plays the successful doctor that sees a little crack baby lying and screaming on the ward and thinks "Wouldn't it be nice to have one of those around the house?". She adopts the little fellow and raise him together with husband and daughter.

The film jumps between Lange's family that take care of the kid and his biological mother, Berry who is building up a new drug free life. She eventually finds out that her child is alive and, of course, then wants him back. Lange doesn't want to let him go. Berry then hires a tough lawyer (Samuel L. Jackson) and trial it is.

An interesting dilemma. And the film handles it good, very good. You really want to know who will get custody and which of the two mothers who gets the ending frame (and then 'wins' the film). The ending and the ending frame unfortunately is a cowardly compromise.

4 out of 5 people found the following review useful:
Synonymous with fascinating, 24 September 1999
10/10

In all reviews I've read that has been positive to Eyes Wide Shut the same word is repeated over and over. Fascinating. And that is just what it is - endlessly fascinating.

I have been waiting for Eyes Wide Shut since the announcement. So when I sat down in the theater my hopes were high, even though the rave reviews were rather few.

The Harford's goes to party and when they come home Alice reveals a sexual fantasy she's been having. That scene is really Scenes from a Marriage on drugs with a Kubrickian twist. After that it becomes a high class thriller.

Both Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman delivers first rate performances. So do the entire cast, in every minor role. Sydney Pollack is much better suited for the part of Victor Ziegler than Harvey Keitel would be. So is Marie Richardson compared to Jennifer Jason Leigh who was originally casted as Marion.

I would like to give special praise to Marie Richardson and Vanessa Shaw who plays Domino. Both is in the film not much longer than approximately six minutes. But they do so much of their parts.

The acting, the camerawork, the editing, the very effective use of music (and not use of music in some sequences), the solo piano in particular. The intelligent dialogue. The whole film, every little detail.

Eyes Wide Shut is perfection. Eyes Wide Shut is a masterpiece. Stanley Kubrick's last film is perhaps his best.

Foul Play (1978)
2 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
Mixes comedy and suspense in a so far unsurpassed way, 28 July 1999

First of all, I'm not going to fool you. My love for Foul Play is much because of nostalgic reasons. But how many films that you thought were great when you were six do you still like (almost) as much? In my case it is only Ronja Rövardotter and this film.

Foul Play (known in Sweden under the name which literary means The Girl Who Knew To Much.) is an unique film in many ways. It is the only film that includes: A hero that is both clumsy, smart, can drive and handle a gun. Three mysterious bad guys that have the individual characteristics that they are albino, dwarf or scarface. Two pensioners of each gender that master karate. A sexually emancipated conductor. A militant feminist librarian. Two old ladies that when they're playing Scrabbles lies a swear word. Slapstick scenes with a bible selling dwarf in a bouncing barrel. Two Japaneses in a taxi who finds dangerous driving very amusing. And of top of that - the Pope!

This are some of the ingredients that makes this film so entertaining. And I haven't mentioned the Hitchcockian plot. Chevy Chase has never been better. Goldie Hawn has never been better. Dudley Moore has never been better. The dialogue is funny and intelligent. The action scenes are so good. The car chase is without a doubt the best in the history of motion pictures.

Foul Play mixes comedy and suspense in a so far unsurpassed way. It is one of they few films that can be called "action comedy" without it is being false marketing.

Love Fools (1998)
0 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
One of the best films of the decade!, 27 July 1999
10/10

The film opens with Torsten, who is a teacher, reading a poem by Swedish poet Stagnelius (a man whom with he shares the same longing.) to his class. He asks if someone can tell what it is about. A kid answers "Maybe it is two who are ... fu**ing?" The class laughs. Torsten thinks about it for a short moment and then says: "Yes, it's a matter of fact you could say that."

Torsten is a 42-year-old virgin. He is in love with Vivianne who work at the cash desk in the local food shop. Torsten has sent anonymous love letters to her. Vivianne is a single parent and her son goes in Torsten's class. Torsten is going to have a talk with Vivianne about Morgan in the school in the evening. He has planned what he will say and that he will ask her out. But things go wrong and the night and the following day is going to be crucial for Torsten, but his life is not the only one who will change.

Torsten is not only described as a romantic man who because of shyness never found a woman. He is also driven by carnal lust. He is tired of teaching uninterested kids and he drinks too much.

Vivianne is also tired of her job and wants a new start. She has lost contact with her son, who is in a difficult age and probably is depressed.

Berit, who works with Vivianne, lives together with Glenn. She's also take care of her old handicapped mom. Something the local police officer and asshole Glenn isn't happy about at all. On top of that she suspects that he's unfaithful.

Tomas von Brömssen, who always is great, makes the character portrait of Torsten to one of his finest ever. Persbrandt is perfect in his role and so is newcomers Anna Wallander and Ia Langhammer.

What a magnificent mood this film has! The pictures looks so great. And, most importantly, is just right for the film. Internationally acclaimed cinematographer Ian Wilson has made dazzling images. The lighting contributes to the mood and so do the production design and peculiar music.

Debut screenwriter Håkan Lindhé has really written a different story. In the hands of Leif Magnusson who made Den gråtande ministern and Kvinnan i det låsta rummet. Two mini series who is something of the best made in that format. Now he has created another masterpiece.

Love Fools (1998)
1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
One of the best films of the decade!, 18 July 1999
10/10

The film opens with Torsten, who is a teacher, reading a poem by Swedish poet Stagnelius (a man whom with he shares the same longing.) to his class. [...]

Torsten is a 42-year-old virgin. He is in love with Vivianne who works at the cash desk in the local food shop. Torsten has sent anonymous love letters to her. Vivianne is a single parent and her son goes in Torsten?s class. Torsten is going to have a talk with Vivianne about Morgan at the school in the evening. He has planned what he will say and that he will ask her out. But things go wrong and the night and the following day is going to be crucial for Torsten, but his life is not the only one who will change.

Torsten is not only described as a romantic man who because of shyness never found a woman. He is also driven by carnal lust. He is tired of teaching uninterested kids and he drinks to much.

Vivianne is also tired of her job and wants a new start. She has lost contact with her son, who is in a difficult age and probably is depressed.

Berit, who works with Vivianne, lives together with Glenn. She also take care of her old handicapped mom. Something the local police officer and asshole Glenn isn't happy about at all. On top of that she suspects that he's unfaithful.

Tomas von Brömssen, who always is great, makes the character portrait of Torsten to one of his finest ever. Persbrandt is perfect in his role and so is newcomers Anna Wallander and Ia Langhammer.

What a magnificent mood this film has! The pictures look so great. And, most importantly, is just right for the film. Internationally acclaimed cinematographer Ian Wilson has made dazzling images. The lighting contributes to the mood and so do the production design and the peculiar music.

Debut screenwriter Håkan Lindhé has really written a different story. In the hands of Leif Magnusson who made Den gråtande ministern and Kvinnan i det låsta rummet. Two mini series who is something of the best made in the that format. Now he has created another masterpiece.

4 out of 8 people found the following review useful:
Powerful, with an everyday tone, 29 May 1999

Joey gets out of prison after six years. What crime he has served we don't know yet. He goes to his parental home and rings on the door. A blonde opens. Joey asks for his brother Tommy, troubled the blonde goes to get him. A surprised Tommy invites his younger brother. Against his wife's (the blonde, Lorraine) wish Tommy and Joey agree that Joey should live at their home a while, until he gets a job and can get a place of his own.

Tommy sells grass and Lorraine works as stripper at private parties. Joey is determined to not get in to jail again and begins to work as a window cleaner. Something that Tommy think is stupid, because there's more money to earn on drugs.

Joey - who according to himself, is a bit 'slow' since an incident in childhood - develops with time a special relationship with Lorraine, who's at first is skeptical to Joey's stay in the house. Tommy appear the longer the film goes as a real asshole - he doesn't to anything home, is unfaithful and lies to his wife. When Joey asks Lorraine is happy with her situation he explain, in the key scene of the film, that marriage doesn't have any benefits; "You get marry when you're in love, then you get tired with each other". Lorraine is in any case grateful of that Tommy haven't during their more than four years together never have beaten her once. Something that her former husband did.

No Way Home (the title unfortunately sounds like an inferior action flick.) is a traditional film, without too many clichés. The director manages to work up scenes and solutions we recognize to something natural. Powerful, with an everyday tone (e.g. when Joey visits his former girlfriend).

The actors in the three leading roles are exquisite: Tim Roth as Joey does a typical Tim Roth role without because of that it would be too much Tim Roth of the role. James Russo (Tommy) makes a role portrait who resembles that kind of things he done before, but I want to rank this performance as the best I've seen from him. Deborah (Kara) Unger as Lorraine, who placed the centre of gravity on the acting and not to look sexy, convinces with her restrained acting style in her study of a woman who's become tired.

7 out of 10 people found the following review useful:
Powerful, with an every day tone, 24 May 1999

Joey gets out of prison after six years. What crime he has served we don't know yet. He goes to his parental home and rings on the door. A blonde opens. Joey asks for his brother Tommy, troubled the blonde goes to get him. A surprised Tommy invites his younger brother. Against his wife's (the blonde) wish Tommy and Joey agree that Joey should live at their home a while, until he get a job and can get a place of his own.

Tommy sells grass and Lorrain works as stripper at private parties. Joey is determined to not get in to jail again and begins to work as a window cleaner. Something that Tommy think is stupid, because there's more money to earn on drugs.

Joey - who according to himself, is a bit 'slow' since a incident in childhood - develops with time a special relationship with Lorrain, who's at first is skeptical to Joey's stay in the house. Tommy appears the longer the film goes as a real a**hole - he doesn't do anything home, is unfaithful and lies to his wife. When Joey asks Lorrain is happy with her situation he explain, in the key scene of the film, that marriage doesn't have any benefits; "You get marry when you're in love, then you get tired with each other". Lorrain is in any case grateful of that Tommy haven't during their more than four years together never have beaten her once. Something that her former husband did.

No Way Back (the title unfortunately sounds like an inferior action flick.) is a traditional film, without too many clichés. The director manages to work up scenes and solutions we recognize to something natural. Powerful, with an every day tone (e.g. when Joey visits his former girlfriend).

The actors in the three leading roles are exquisite: Tim Roth as Joey does a typical Tim Roth role without because of that it would be too much Tim Roth of the role. James Russo (Tommy) makes a role portrait who resembles that kind of things he done before, but I want to rank this performance as the best I've seen from him. Deborah (Kara) Unger as Lorrain, who placed the centre of gravity on the acting and not to look sexy, convinces with her restrained acting style in her study of a woman who's become tired.

Zingo (1998)
2 out of 4 people found the following review useful:
Great dialogue and supporting cast, 1 May 1999
7/10

Björn Kjellman is, as always solid, in the title role. But what really lift this film is the supporting cast. Newcomer Tommy Andersson is a find as the aggressive Jocke. Thomas Hellberg plays the former star Ken Karlsson. Hellberg does something of a the performance of his career. The underrated Per Morberg is fabulous as the struggling director Mos. All three gives Guldbagge worthy performances. Unfortunately it disappeared in the shadow of many other successful Swedish films 1998.

Mos makes porn films for producer Benno (played by Hans Henriksson, who's a lot of fun). But Mos dreams of something else. He wants to do a serious film out of script he's been writing for five year called Den bruna filmen (The Brown Film). Benno isn't interested, but his cousin Zingo - who wants to leave his wild days behind him a live a normal life - is. With Zingo producing they decide to make Den bruna filmen. But Benno and his German partner who are financing it, think they are doing a trailer for a porno called Kingsize starring Ken Karlsson and a moose. (Zingo got to do the trailer to get more money for the real film, but Ken doesn't know anything about it).

The films lowest assets is the character of Puda (Jarmo Mäkinen), the drug-dealing biker and cineast. It's a character we recognize from many American films from this decade. I think that the serious scenes between Zingo and his father feels misplaced. The films foremost assets is its supporting cast and the dialogue (see the quotes, which I contributed). Wegner's direction is fine and the shape of Zingo works well, the editing with jump cuts suits. The photography is medium flashy, but with too much strobe in some scenes for my taste.


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