Reviews written by registered user
buk-3

2 reviews in total 
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4 out of 6 people found the following review useful:
Superb documentary on a unique band, 17 February 2000
10/10

I missed this film when it played the Toronto International Film Festival and had found it extremely difficult to locate on video. I recently tracked down a copy on DVD and was floored by the content.

The film is sincere, informed, and very well put together all around. Filled with anecdotes and facts from HJ's history, featuring interviews with Jad and David, Don Fleming, G. Cosley, Maureen Tucker, J & D's Parents, and others.

If you like independent music--or aren't familiar with the genre outside of having heard it exists--check out this film. It will be well worth your time. The DVD also contains their "Live In Hell" video, which is a lot of fun.

Fight Club (1999)
861 out of 1119 people found the following review useful:
A unique film, 15 October 1999
10/10

Fight Club is one of the most unique films I have ever seen. In addition to presenting a rather fresh take on life, FC also presents its material in a fresh way. My main interest in the film is in that, in my opinion, it does not present characters for us to think about. Rather, it presents actions for us to think about. I will say that I cannot recall *ever* having been "asked" by a film to both suspend my disbelief the way this film asks in its third act AND at the same time come to terms with an understanding that there is no room--or need--for disbelief.

Perhaps these comments will not make sense to the average movie goer who will dismiss this film--and, unfortunately, its premise--as another hollywood flick filled with gratuitous violence. I'd go as far as to say that this film is not about violence. It is about choices. It is about activity. It is about lethargy. It is about waking up and realizing that at some point in the past we've gone to the toilet and thrown up our dreams without even realizing that society has stuck its fingers down our throat.

I would argue that anyone caught, at some point in their lives, between a rock and a hard place--anyone who has reached bottom on a mental level--anyone who has uttered to themselves "Wait, this isn't right. I would not do/say/feel what it is that I just did/said/felt... I do not like this. I must change before I am forever stuck being the person that I am not." These people, they will know what I'm talking about. These people will not only recognize the similarities between Edward Norton's character and themselves--they will be uncomfortably familiar with him. These people will appreciate Fight Club for what it is: a wake up call that we are not alone.

As David Berman once said: "I'm afraid I've got more in common with who I was than who I am becoming." If this sentence makes any sense to you, go see Fight Club. You won't regret it.

L.