Romper Stomper is an Australian television series sequel to the 1992 film Romper Stomper movie and and set 25 years after the events in the film. The six-part series follows a new ... See full summary »
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1  
2018  
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Cast

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 Blake Farron 6 episodes, 2018
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Jamie Abdallah ...
Markella Kavenagh ...
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Kaden Hartcher ...
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Syd Zygier ...
Jordan Mooney ...
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Fletcher Humphrys ...
Philip Hayden ...
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Richard Anastasios ...
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Bryony Hindley ...
Cliff Ellen ...
 Martin Jordan 4 episodes, 2018
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David Woods ...
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Puven Pather ...
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Storyline

Romper Stomper is an Australian television series sequel to the 1992 film Romper Stomper movie and and set 25 years after the events in the film. The six-part series follows a new generation of far-right activists and their anti-fascist counterparts, with the story focussing on a fictional far-right group led by Blake Farrand known as Patriot Blue.

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Drama

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2018 (Australia)  »

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The opening scene of the series echoes the ending shot of the original film See more »

Connections

Follows Romper Stomper (1992) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Polarising and illuminating
3 January 2018 | by See all my reviews

The show provides many insights into racism, extremism, and their modern iterations, without apology. And I applaud it for that.

While delving into the modern far right and left wing, it doesn't succumb to the false equivalency they've been subjected to in recent times. "Anti-fasc" while anarchistic and occasionally violent, are shown to be at the very least compassionate (helping a homeless child), and respectful (when asking for support, offering to let them prove themselves first). On the converse Patriot Blue are shown to use tactics not uncommon to their real life counterparts. Intimidation and demands (not requests) of loyalty are common, and brutal. While they may be two sides of the same coin, one side exudes humanity, the other, inhumanity.

Further, the media does not get off lightly, David Wenham is (as usual) excellent. His depiction of a journalist clearly inspired by, shall we just say A.B. is accurate to a tee. While generally quite eloquent, when his facade has been challenged a different kind of monster emerges, and Wenham has nailed it.

Character development, while occasionally slow, is very well done, with the occasional twist. The tragic story of the main character had me feeling exceptionally lucky, and Toby Wallace does a fantastic job with him. A relatively nuanced performance, and the almost imperceptible tics he provides the character makes you feel as though you both do and don't know this person, and that's intentional.

Confronting for some, challenging for most, this show should be judged on its' merits, as such a recommended viewing for anyone (within the age restrictions obviously). But remember, if this show makes the hair on your back bristle, ask yourself; why?


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