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1-20 of 60 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


How ‘A Man Called Ove’ Became a Sleeper For the Best Foreign Film Oscar

22 December 2016 1:59 PM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Edward Arentz is in a good mood. Earlier this year at the Berlin Film Festival, the Music Box Films managing director picked up a little Swedish comedy, “A Man Called Ove.” (That’s “oo-veh.”) No one else was much interested in the grumpy-old-man movie starring the original Wallander, Rolf Lassgård, which falls in the mold of Jack Nicholson’s “About Schmidt” or Clint Eastwood’s “Grand Torino” (without the guns).

 

 

But Arentz found himself crying, laughing, and deeply moved. And over the years he has learned to trust his gut. After all, he picked up U.S. rights to three other little Swedish films that became a worldwide phenomenon, “The Girl with a Dragon Tattoo” series ($22 million U.S. total). That experience paved the way for “A Man Called Ove.” At $3.3 million, it’s the highest-grossing foreign-language film of 2016, has landed on the foreign-language Oscar shortlist, and has a strong shot at a nomination. »

- Anne Thompson

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How ‘A Man Called Ove’ Became a Sleeper For the Best Foreign Film Oscar

22 December 2016 1:59 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Edward Arentz is in a good mood. Earlier this year at the Berlin Film Festival, the Music Box Films managing director picked up a little Swedish comedy, “A Man Called Ove.” (That’s “oo-veh.”) No one else was much interested in the grumpy-old-man movie starring the original Wallander, Rolf Lassgård, which falls in the mold of Jack Nicholson’s “About Schmidt” or Clint Eastwood’s “Grand Torino” (without the guns).

 

 

But Arentz found himself crying, laughing, and deeply moved. And over the years he has learned to trust his gut. After all, he picked up U.S. rights to three other little Swedish films that became a worldwide phenomenon, “The Girl with a Dragon Tattoo” series ($22 million U.S. total). That experience paved the way for “A Man Called Ove.” At $3.3 million, it’s the highest-grossing foreign-language film of 2016, has landed on the foreign-language Oscar shortlist, and has a strong shot at a nomination. »

- Anne Thompson

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‘Elle,’ ‘The Dancer,’ ‘Frantz,’ ‘Staying Vertical’ Vie for Lumiere Awards

16 December 2016 8:30 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paul Verhoeven’s “Elle,” Stéphanie di Giusto
’s “The Dancer,” François Ozon’s “Frantz” and Alain Guiraudie’s “Staying Vertical” are leading nominations at the 22nd edition of the Lumiere Awards, France’s equivalent to the Golden Globes.

Voted on by Paris-based members of the foreign press, the Lumiere Awards are often considered a milestone in France’s awards season which ends with the Cesar Awards in February.

Besides “Elle” and “Staying Vertical” which premiered at Cannes in competition, other best film contenders include Albert Serra’s “The Death of Louis Xiv,” Léa Fehner’s “Les ogres,” Bertrand Bonello’s “Nocturama” and Stéphane Brizé’s “Une vie.”

Houda Benyamina’s Directors’ Fortnight player “Divines” is vying for best feature debut and its two lead actresses Oulaya Amamra and Déborah Lukumuena are nominated for best female newcomer.

Gaspard Ulliel is nominated for his performance in Xavier Dolan’s “It’s Only »

- Elsa Keslassy

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‘Sense of an Ending’ to Open Palm Springs Film Festival (Full Lineup)

15 December 2016 7:39 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The 28th annual Palm Springs International Film Festival will open Jan. 2 with the world premiere screening of “The Sense of an Ending,” starring Jim Broadbent and Charlotte Rampling.

“Ending” is directed by Ritesh Batra and written by Nick Payne, based on the novel of same name by Julian Barnes. The film also stars Harriet Walter, Emily Mortimer, and Michelle Dockery.

The festival will close with Robert De Niro’s “The Comedian,” directed by Taylor Hackford on Jan. 15. “The Comedian” premiered last month at the AFI Fest.

Special presentations including the world premiere of “Breakable You”; the U.S. premiere of “King of the Dancehall,” directed by Nick Cannon; “Old Money,” directed by David Schalko and starring Udo Kier; and the North American premiere of “The Hippopotamus.”

The Palm Springs Festival will screen 190 films from 72 countries, including 58 premieres.

View the complete lineup below:

World premieres:

– The Beautiful Fantastic (UK/U.S. »

- Dave McNary

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François Ozon To Direct ‘Double Lover’ Next

17 October 2016 1:57 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

While someone like Woody Allen tends to get name-checked immediately when it comes to directors who work at a prolific clip, it can be easy to forget that François Ozon is no slouch either. The French filmmaker has been working steadily, releasing nearly a film each year, since his debut “Sitcom” eighteen years ago. And with his latest “Frantz” barely off the festival circuit, Ozon is gearing up to go behind the camera again.

Continue reading François Ozon To Direct ‘Double Lover’ Next at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Lff: Athina Rachel Tsangari, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Abi Morgan among jurors

29 September 2016 5:30 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Michael Sheen will host this year’s London Film Festival awards ceremony.

The juries for the 60th BFI London Film Festival (Oct 5-16) have been revealed.

Athina Rachel Tsangari, director of Chevalier - winner of best film at last year’s Lff and Greece’s Oscar entry this year – will preside over this year’s Official Competition.

That jury will also feature Belle star Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Suffragette writer Abi Morgan, Aferim! director Radu Jude, and Ilo Ilo director Anthony Chen.

They will oversee a line-up including Paul Verhoeven’s Elle, submitted by France to the 2017 Oscar race, Barry JenkinsMoonlight, François Ozon’s Frantz¸ Mohamed Diab’s Clash, and Benedict AndrewsUna.

Frost/Nixon and The Queen star Michael Sheen will host this year’s awards ceremony at Banqueting House on Oct 15, where 12 Years A Slave director Steve McQueen will receive a BFI Fellowship award.

Elsewhere, Suffragette director Sarah Gavron will preside over the First Feature Competition »

- tom.grater@screendaily.com (Tom Grater)

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Foreign Oscar Watch: Can "Elle" Slay the Competition?

26 September 2016 9:45 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Verhoeven & Huppert at Cannes this summer

France, as ever, was spoiled with options when it came to selecting their film for Oscar competition this year. Frantz (reviewed) from François Ozon would likely have appealed to Oscar voters but the selection committee went with the controversial Elle (reviewed at Tiff). It's a brave choice but we think a smart one; even if its divisive within initial voting, it will likely be a candidate to benefit under the Executive Committee 'saves' rule. Plus those who love it will love it passionately meaning it could even have a dark horse shot at a win. Not only does it have a high profile auteur and star (Paul Verhoeven and Isabelle Huppert) but it's got sensational reviews, a Us release on the table in the thick of Oscar traction season (November 11th), and an outside shot at a Best Actress nomination. France has not won »

- NATHANIEL R

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France submits Verhoeven’s 'Elle' to Oscar race

26 September 2016 9:11 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

First time France submits film by non-French national since 1977.

Dutch filmmaker Paul Verhoeven’s revenge thriller Elle will represent France as the country’s submission to the Best Foreign Language Film category at the 89th Academy Awards next year.

France’s National Cinema Centre (Cnc), which oversees the selection process, made the announcement on Monday (Sept 26).

Verhoeven’s French-language debut stars Isabelle Huppert as a video game company boss who seeks revenge on a brutal rapist.

The film generated considerable buzz at Cannes, where it world premiered in Competition, for its subject matter and Huppert’s strong performance.

Read: Paul Verhoeven talks returning to Cannes with ‘Elle

It is the first time France has submitted a film by a non-French national since Israeli director Moshé Mizrahi’s Madame Rosa, starring Simone Signoret as a retired prostitute, in 1977. It went on to win the Foreign Language category.

Verhoeven’s films have been submitted for the Foreign Language category »

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France Picks Paul Verhoeven’s Sexy Thriller ‘Elle’ For 2017 Best Foreign Language Oscar Submission

26 September 2016 9:02 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Sony Pictures Classics, Isabelle Huppert and Paul Verhoeven are very happy.

Bravo to France for taking a risk by picking their official foreign language Oscar submission, “Elle,” over shortlist contenders “The Innocents” by Anne Fontaine, “Frantz” by François Ozon and “Cézanne and I” by Danièle Thompson. Spc took a chance that the Cannes competition entry would make the cut when they acquired “Elle” out of Cannes.

Why the risk? Well, it’s one thing for the movie to play well with sophisticated audiences and critics in Europe, and another in North America, where the psychosexual thriller may run into a different set of reactions, especially from politically correct sensibilities such as Women in Hollywood’s Melissa Silverstein. (Post Cannes and Toronto, “Elle” sits at a very high 87% on Metacritic.)

Read More: ‘Elle’ Exclusive Clip: Isabelle Huppert Takes Revenge On An Attacker In Paul Verhoeven’s Latest Thriller

Always enjoying stirring »

- Anne Thompson

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France Picks Paul Verhoeven’s Sexy Thriller ‘Elle’ For 2017 Best Foreign Language Oscar Submission

26 September 2016 9:02 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Sony Pictures Classics, Isabelle Huppert and Paul Verhoeven are very happy.

Bravo to France for taking a risk by picking their official foreign language Oscar submission, “Elle,” over shortlist contenders “The Innocents” by Anne Fontaine, “Frantz” by François Ozon and “Cézanne and I” by Danièle Thompson. Spc took a chance that the Cannes competition entry would make the cut when they acquired “Elle” out of Cannes.

Why the risk? Well, it’s one thing for the movie to play well with sophisticated audiences and critics in Europe, and another in North America, where the dark psychosexual thriller may run into a different set of reactions, especially from politically correct sensibilities such as Women in Hollywood’s Melissa Silverstein. (Post Cannes and Toronto, “Elle” sits at a very high 87% on Metacritic.)

Read More: ‘Elle’ Exclusive Clip: Isabelle Huppert Takes Revenge On An Attacker In Paul Verhoeven’s Latest Thriller

Always enjoying »

- Anne Thompson

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France Selects Paul Verhoeven’s Isabelle Huppert-Starrer ‘Elle’ As Its Foreign-Language Oscar Entry

26 September 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Will Paul Verhoeven, director of “Total Recall” and “Basic Instinct,” be making a Hollywood comeback? A French selection committee has chosen Isabelle Huppert-starrer “Elle,” directed by Verhoeven, as France’s candidate in the foreign-language category of next year’s Academy Awards.

The French-language debut of Verhoeven, “Elle” stars Huppert as the head of a top European video games company who is ruthless in business and in love. Brutally raped, she determines to track down the man who did it, as her life threatens to spiral out of control.

Elle” won out over three other French films on a shortlist comprising Francois Ozon’s black-and-white drama “Frantz,” which won German lead Paula Beer a best young performer award at Venice; Anne Fontaine’s 1945 Poland-set “The Innocents,” which screened at Sundance; and Daniele Thompson’s “Cezanne and I,” the tale of the onetime friendship between painter Paul Cezanne and author Emile Zola. »

- John Hopewell

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France Selects Paul Verhoeven’s ‘Elle’ As Foreign Language Oscar Submission

26 September 2016 7:53 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

France has chosen to put forth Paul Verhoeven's first French-language film, Elle, as its submission for the Foreign Language Oscar race. The selection committee at national film board the Cnc made the decision on the Isabelle Huppert-starrer Monday, after “long and passionate debates.” It chose from a field of four movies that had been shortlisted. They also included François Ozon's Frantz; Anne Fontaine's Agnus Dei; and Danièle Thompson's Cézanne Et Moi. Elle was a hit… »

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Nine movies that popped at autumn festivals

21 September 2016 3:36 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Screen’s chief film critic Fionnuala Halligan notes the films that stood out from the pack at this year’s Venice, Telluride and Toronto film festivals.1. La-La Land

La La Land

It opened the Venice Film Festival, charged into Telluride and continued to draw queues throughout its Toronto Film Festival run where it won the coveted Audience Award. Saturation coverage for Lionsgate’s uber-romantic Damien Chazelle-directed musical was assisted by Emma Stone’s Best Actress win at Venice. Now it heads to the Zurich and London film festivals before a limited release in the Us on December 2, opening wide on the 16th. Happy Christmas for all concerned: by the end of the fall festival guzzle, La La Land seems to be the one to beat for Best Picture.

Contact: Lionsgate

2. Nocturnal Animals

Tom Ford won Best Director at Venice for his adaptation of Austin Wright’s narratively snakey novel Tony And Susan, and deservedly »

- finn.halligan@screendaily.com (Fionnuala Halligan)

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Hamptons International Film Festival Announces Spotlight Films Including ‘La La Land’

20 September 2016 12:00 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Hamptons International Film Festival (Hiff) has announced the titles screening in several sections of the festival’s programming, including Spotlight, World Cinema and Views from Long Island.

Damien Chazelle’s highly-acclaimed “La La Land,” which has already seen success at the Venice and Toronto Film Festivals, is among the movies on the Spotlight slate. Other Spotlight Films include Jordan Roberts’ “Burn Your Maps,” Garth Davis’ “Lion” and Barry Jenkins’ “Moonlight,” among others.

“Over Columbus Day Weekend in a spectacular setting, we offer five full days of films for our impassioned audience, including dozens of premieres as well as the breakout hits and award winners from the Sundance, Berlin, Cannes, and Toronto Film Festivals,” said Hiff Artistic Director David Nugent. “From the dazzling choreography of ‘La La Land,’ the quiet beauty of ‘Moonlight,’ to the belly laughs of ‘Toni Erdmann,’ our audiences will see the films that are sure to »

- Arya Roshanian

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Tiff 2016: Winners & Review Index

18 September 2016 4:03 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Tiff just ended crowning La La Land with the coveted People's Choice Award (runners up: Lion & Queen of Katwe) and Jackie with their new juried prize. We haven't totally closed up shop - we've left the door ajar because there are a few articles left to come. It takes time processing all of this art that's rushing over us! Films give us so many feelings! The Toronto International Film Festival is my personal favorite film festival in the world:  easy to attend, friendly, well organized, less prohibitively expensive than other festivals. I saw and enjoyed 27 movies and would have seen a few more but for getting sick in the rain and rush. But the festival experience is such that even mediocre or bad movies can be remembered with positive associations.

Here are all the reviews and articles (thus far) in one place in case you missed any or would like a handy index. »

- NATHANIEL R

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Lovesick Brides to Be at Tiff

17 September 2016 6:40 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Nathaniel reporting from the last weekend at Tiff where brides-to-be are in the air. It's easy to see little mini-festivals blossom within the overall festival you're watching. Sometimes it happens quite by accident as with three films I caught recently (two of which might be fighting for Oscar foreign film nods). All feature female protagonists who pine for a man they thought they would marry before things went horribly wrong. We've already discussed François Ozon's Frantz. In that film the fiancee is already dead when the movie begins but in these next two films The Wedding Ring from Niger and Sand Storm from Israel, both of the young women begin the movie with a combination of dread and hope: will they be able to marry the man they loved who they met in a liberal university setting or does their conservative rural village community have other futures in mind? »

- NATHANIEL R

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Tiff: François Ozon's Elegant "Frantz"

16 September 2016 7:12 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Nathaniel R reporting from Tiff

Frantz is dead when Frantz begins though everyone who knew him keeps willing him back to life through memories and the general refusal to let go. The movie has a terrifically simple plot generating event which reaps bountiful plot threads and emotions: In 1919 Germany, just after the first World War, a young girl named Anna (Paula Beer, Venice Winner Best Young Actor) repeatedly encounters a Frenchman named Adrien (Pierre Niney) while visiting her dead fiancee Frantz's (Anton von Lucke) grave. Then he comes knocking at her door. Why is he there? What does he want with Anna and Frantz parents? At first she and Frantz's parents (Ernst Stötzner and Marie Gruber, both superb) are wary about him since the wounds between the countries are still fresh. Quickly they warm to him though, much to their town's disapproval, when they realize that he knew »

- NATHANIEL R

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France Sets Foreign Language Oscar Shortlist; Felicity Jones To Be Honored At Britannia Awards; More – Global Briefs

15 September 2016 8:33 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

France has shortlisted four films for the Foreign Language Oscar race with the official entry to be determined later this month. The selection committee will be voting on two films that Music Box has Stateside: Anne Fontaine's Sundance pic Agnus Dei which was released as The Innocents and has grossed about $1M to date; and François Ozon's Frantz which just debuted in Venice and won the Best New Actress prize for Paula Beer. Also on the list is Paul Verhoeven's lauded Elle… »

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France Sets Foreign Language Oscar Shortlist; Felicity Jones To Be Honored At Britannia Awards; More – Global Briefs

15 September 2016 8:33 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

France has shortlisted four films for the Foreign Language Oscar race with the official entry to be determined later this month. The selection committee will be voting on two films that Music Box has Stateside: Anne Fontaine's Sundance pic Agnus Dei which was released as The Innocents and has grossed about $1M to date; and François Ozon's Frantz which just debuted in Venice and won the Best New Actress prize for Paula Beer. Also on the list is Paul Verhoeven's lauded Elle… »

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The Best Films at the 2016 Venice Film Festival

12 September 2016 9:43 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With the jury winners announced this past weekend (see at the bottom), the 73rd Venice International Film Festival has now come to an end. As always, it was a strong kick-off to the fall festivals, with some premieres of dramas that we’ll see over the next few months, as well as a great many that won’t arrive until next year (or perhaps later, pending distribution). We’ve wrapped up the festival by selecting our 9 favorite films, followed by our complete coverage. Check out everything below and let us know what you’re most looking forward to.

Austerlitz (Sergei Loznitsa)

Having experimented with feature-length fiction films, shorts, and archival-footage documentaries in the course of his career, Sergei Loznitsa’s output since his 2014 Ukrainian crisis documentary Maidan has both garnered him greater acclaim than before and zeroed in on cinema as a collectively generated form. – Tommaso T. (full review)

Hacksaw Ridge »

- The Film Stage

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