Whitney (2015) - News Poster

(2015 TV Movie)

News

Meet the Grieving Military Moms and Widows Who Say President Trump Never Called Them

Meet the Grieving Military Moms and Widows Who Say President Trump Never Called Them
President Trump has claimed that he alone — not Barack Obama or other past presidents — has called “virtually” all families of U.S. soldiers who have died in service since Trump took office in January.

But Gold Star families have since lashed out at Trump over his false claims about past presidents, recalling how they were comforted by Obama and former President George W. Bush as they grieved. Trump was soon forced to walk back what Obama aides called an “outrageous lie,” admitting that his predecessor “probably sometimes and maybe sometimes he didn’t. I don’t know.”

But now some
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Unreleased Whitney Houston Recordings to Debut in Honor of 'The Bodyguard's 25th Anniversary (Exclusive)

Unreleased Whitney Houston Recordings to Debut in Honor of 'The Bodyguard's 25th Anniversary (Exclusive)
The 25th anniversary of The Bodyguard will be celebrated with new Whitney Houston recordings -- and only Et has the exclusive details.  

Legacy Recordings, in cooperation with the Estate of Whitney E. Houston, is paying tribute to The Bodyguard Original Soundtrack, which became the best-selling soundtrack of all time, with the release of Whitney Houston -- I Wish You Love: More From The Bodyguard on Nov. 17. 

Exclusive: Deborah Cox Talks Channeling Whitney Houston for 'Bodyguard' Tour, Says She Has Family's Blessing

The album will feature a collection of unreleased live and studio recordings from Houston's The Bodyguard Tour from 1993 to 1995, an alternate version of a remix of "I'm Every Woman" and other alternate versions of audio recordings from The Bodyguard film.

In addition, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment is honoring the classic film starring Houston and Kevin Costner by re-releasing special features for select digital retailers on Oct. 31. 

On Nov. 4, Fontainebleau Miami Beach, which
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

'Whitney: Can I Be Me' Director Speaks Out on Legendary Singer: 'She Was So Judged'

'Whitney: Can I Be Me' Director Speaks Out on Legendary Singer: 'She Was So Judged'
One year ago, veteran documentary filmmaker Nick Broomfield realized that something was wrong. He was about three months into postproduction on Whitney: Can I Be Me, his new documentary on the life and death of Whitney Houston – and sitting in his editing room, he found himself "in complete despair." In its rough state, the movie was primarily a compendium of experts and talking heads opining about the singer's influence and legacy – a "journalistic report" as Broomfield calls it. But, he notes, "I wasn't feeling my heart moved by the story.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Whitney: Can I Be Me review – sex and drugs and a family at war

Nick Broomfield’s Whitney Houston documentary is an engrossing and compassionate portrait of a supremely talented singer racked by self doubt

Nick Broomfield’s documentary portrait of Whitney Houston shows once again that her climactic “I” in I Will Always Love You is one of the most amazing moments in pop music: a sustained blazing siren of euphoric self-affirmation. That song became the keynote of her smash-hit movie The Bodyguard in 1992 with Kevin Costner, and sealed her global megastar triumph. (Much stronger, for me, than Celine Dion’s My Heart Will Go On from Titanic.)

Whitney’s hurricane-force “I” all but blitzes the song’s meaning, which I only fully appreciated on listening to Dolly Parton’s considerably more muted and melancholy self-penned original from 1973. The singer is of course renouncing her claim on the loved one. But the way Houston belts it out, she is owning everything and anything.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Laff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Julia Meltzer — “Dalya’s Other Country”

“Dalya’s Other Country”

Julia Meltzer is an award-winning filmmaker and the founder and director of Clockshop, an arts organization. She previously directed the feature film, “The Light in Her Eyes,” which broadcast on “Pov” in 2012 and toured with the Sundance Film Forward program. Meltzer’s work has been shown at the Whitney Biennial, Idfa, Toronto International Film Festival, and the International Film Festival Rotterdam. She is a recipient of grants from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and was a senior Fulbright fellow in Damascus, Syria from 2005 to 2006.

“Dalya’s Other Country” will premiere at the 2017 La Film Festival on June 17 and make its broadcast premiere on PBS’ “Pov” on June 26.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Jm: “Dalya’s Other Country” is about Dalya and her mother Rudayna adjusting to life in Southern California after fleeing Aleppo, Syria when the war began there in 2012. The film follows Dalya through four years of high school where she is the only Muslim student attending an all-girls Catholic school.

Dalya moves through her teenage years, from 14 to 18 years of age, with increasing confidence. She finds herself to be a self-described Syrian-American feminist responding to growing anti-Muslim sentiment in the lead up to the 2016 presidential election.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Jm: I lived in Syria in 2005 for a year, and then I returned there every year until just before the war started more than six years ago. My last film, “The Light In Her Eyes,” was about a Qur’an school for women and girls in Damascus, so I’ve spent quite a bit of time learning about and engaging with Syrian culture and Sunni Muslim women.

When my last film was broadcast on “Pov” in 2012, Aleppo was just entering the war. I spent time in Aleppo and loved it. It was devastating to think about what might happen to the city and its inhabitants. I wanted to find a family from Aleppo who had recently come to Los Angeles escaping the war.

Mustafa Zeno, the co-producer of “Dalya’s Other Country,” worked on my last film doing outreach and distribution. I realized that his mother and sister had recently come from there and that the story I was searching for was right underneath my nose.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Jm: I want people to absorb the perspective of a young Syrian Muslim woman and how she sees the world during these complicated times. Dalya is an incredibly open-minded and adaptable person — if only we could all be like her!

What I hope people see is that most young people take in the world around them and have an easy time adjusting to different beliefs, values, and cultures if they are surrounded by love. I hope people can take that lesson in.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Jm: My daughter Amina was born in July 2012 and I started shooting “Dalya’s Other Country” before she turned one. The biggest challenge for me was to adjust to being a mother and a filmmaker: juggling child-care schedules, my desire to be with her and be a present person, and also to make another film.

Amina came with me on several shoots and I slowly figured out how to integrate all of these responsibilities together. It helped that my partner is a supportive and present father who shared the child-care with me, and that we had an amazing babysitter too.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Jm: I decided very early on that I would make this film in a very small and manageable way. I drew on my community of filmmaking friends who are incredibly talented and skilled.

Anne Etheridge, my Dp, agreed to work for a lower rate throughout. Catherine Hollander, my editor, also lowered her rate and committed to the project over four years. Iryna Kucherenko, my main sound person, did the same. I’m grateful to all of these talented women who stuck with me.

I raised some money from grants at the beginning of production and then I put in my own money to carry the film through rough cut. Towards the end of post-production I got several other grants that took me almost to delivery. At the very end I learned that “Pov” was going to take the film and I breathed a huge sigh of relief. The licensing fee covered all the money that I put in and a little more.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at the Laff?

Jm: As a former Film Independent Doc Lab fellow and an La-native, it means so much to me. Where do I start? My whole crew is here, my family is here, Dalya’s family is here. To have a screening with everyone present is a dream.

Los Angeles is at the forefront of the pro-immigrant movement in our country. There is simply no better place for my film to have its world premiere.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Jm: Way back in 1992 I was just starting out as a filmmaker, I met a documentarian, Richard Cohen. He said to me, “Don’t choose this life. It’s a terrible career.” In some ways that was both the best and the worst advice together.

I remember thinking that he was just a depressed guy who couldn’t finish his film. However, looking back, I do see some wisdom in that advice — he was passing on part of his experience and it served as both a warning and threat. I knew that if I moved forward and pursued filmmaking, I better make sure that I really loved it or else!

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Jm: My advice to other female directors is to gather your core people around you. Work for your filmmaker friends and barter your skills and services. Develop a crew who you can count on by being that person too. It’s a tough world out there and you will need these people to survive and get that film made!

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Jm: There are so many. It’s hard to choose only one. “Vagabond” by Agnés Varda has been on my mind. It is such a perfectly paced film and Sandrine Bonnaire is unrelenting and uncompromising as the main character. I love the truth of Mona’s life as a drifter and a traveler.

There are so few films about women traveling by themselves and on their own terms, so this film is a true gem. As a viewer you want Mona to be friendly, fake it a little bit, just so she can be treated better and get by.

But she is who she is throughout the whole film — she is selfish and a survivor. It’s a brutal beginning and end, though. I admire Varda for so many reasons but also for making a film that is simple, beautiful, honest, and also deeply complex.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Jm: I’m going to quote James Baldwin because I often think of this quote when I’m feeling pessimistic and needing to turn things around. He said, “I can’t be a pessimist because I’m alive. To be a pessimist means that you have agreed that human life is an academic matter, so I’m forced to be an optimist. I’m forced to believe that we can survive whatever we must survive.”

https://medium.com/media/ed92f002247b1e73fa552210ec533238/href

Laff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Julia Meltzer — “Dalya’s Other Country” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Clive Davis Discusses ‘Gripping’ Documentary ‘Soundtrack of Our Lives,’ Prince and Working With Geniuses

Clive Davis Discusses ‘Gripping’ Documentary ‘Soundtrack of Our Lives,’ Prince and Working With Geniuses
There have been many great “record men” since the advent of what we now know as popular music, but there’s only one Clive Davis.

His story has been told many times, not least in the documentary, “Clive Davis: The Soundtrack of Our Lives,” which was directed by Chris Perkel and premieres at Radio City Music Hall as part of the Tribeca Film Festival Wednesday night. Davis, now 85, began his career as an attorney and was hired by Columbia Records, a client of the firm for which he worked, in 1960. He rose through the ranks and was appointed president of the label in 1967, and shortly afterward experienced an epiphany at the Monterey Pop Festival (the 50th anniversary of which is coming up in June), coming away with not just a vision of the burgeoning rock revolution, but also a contract for Janis Joplin. In the half century since then — at Columbia,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

John Ridley to write, direct 'Needle In A Haystack'

  • ScreenDaily
Miramax hires Oscar-winning writer of 12 Years A Slave.

John Ridley has signed on to write and direct Needle In A Haystack for Miramax as his next feature.

The project is based on a short story by Robert Silverberg about a devoted husband who will stop at nothing to save his marriage when it is destroyed by a time-travelling rival.

Vince Gerardis and Matt Kennedy will serve as executive producers. Zanne Devine, head of film and TV, and David Thwaites, senior vice-president of film, will oversee the project for Miramax.

Ridley engaged in a heated exchange last week with audience members at the London premiere of Guerrilla over a perceived lack of black women in his new show about London activists in the 1970s.

Besides Guerrilla, Ridley’s current projects include the La Riots documentary Let It Fall for ABC News, and Season 3 of ABC’s American Crime.

Miramax’s upcoming projects include I, Tonya, the Johnny Depp
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Colony: Renewed for Season 3 at USA!!

Colony fans can watch the finale with the assurance the fight will continue!

USA Network renewed the sci-fi series ahead of the Colony Season 2 finale this coming Thursday.

The series not only features aliens and action but addresses the moral dilemmas that arise during times of political dissonance.

The series stars Josh Holloway and Sarah Wayne Callies and has been among the top cable dramas on Thursdays.

The third season will again consist of 13 episodes.

"Colony continues to fire on all cylinders creatively, with Carlton, Ryan and our incredible cast and crew striking a deep chord around the themes of humanity, survival and family," said Chris McCumber, president of entertainment networks at NBCUniversal Cable Entertainment.

"Along with our partners Legendary Television and Universal Cable Productions, we can’t wait to see what’s in store for our heroes next season."

Colony could be compared to some of the greatest shows airing on television.
See full article at TVfanatic »

Stars of Orange Is The New Black and More Featured in Musical Mockumentary Happy Yummy Chicken

Taryn Manning Orange is the New Black, Hustle amp Flow, Crossroads, Suzzanne Douglas How Stella Got Her Groove Back, Lifetime's Whitney, Emma Myles Orange is the New Black, Child of Grace and Diane Guerrero Jane the Virgin, Orange is the New Black star in musical theatre mockumentary Happy Yummy Chicken, written by Brandon Monokian and directed by Anna Loyd Bradshaw.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

“A Woman, a Part” Director Elisabeth Subrin on Making a Movie About a Woman Over 40

“A Woman, a Part”

Elisabeth Subrin’s critically acclaimed films and video art have screened widely internationally, including at The New York Film Festival, The Rotterdam International Film Festival, The Vienna Viennale, The Whitney Biennial, The Sundance Channel, and The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Her film “Shulie” was selected for the once-a-decade British Film Institute’s Sight&Sound critic’s poll of “Greatest Films Ever.” Her other credits include “Lost Tribes,” “The Caretakers,” and “The Fancy.” “A Woman, a Part” is her feature debut.

“A Woman, a Part” opens March 22 at the IFC Center in New York.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Es: A burnt out, workaholic TV actress escapes Hollywood and runs home to NYC, hoping to reinvent herself by reconnecting with the theater friends she had abandoned. Instead, it opens a Pandora’s Box of unresolved conflicts, loves, and choices.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Es: I wanted to write a film about complex, interesting women over 40 whose problems do not revolve around marriage, children, and romantic relationships.

Thematically I wanted to explore burnout, life changes, and the psychic impact of sexist female representations.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Es: “Wow, that felt real and beautiful. I want to think about it more and see it again.”

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Es: Definitely the financing. The bias we encountered in people’s responses to the script was so intense. One potential financier said, “The last thing I’m interested in is a story about a middle aged actor who leaves La for NY to find authenticity by reconnect with friends in the theater world.” My producer pointed out, “Unless it’s a little movie called ‘Birdman,’ right?” We got many enthusiastic responses to the script, with the tagline: “We don’t know how to market this.”

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Es: It was a combination of small private equity investments, grants, and a Kickstarter. But what really got it funded was a deadline.

Maggie Siff, who plays our protagonist, found out her TV show “Billions” had gotten picked up, and so we had to shoot the film several months in advance, or postpone for a year. That really lit the fire and made me far more aggressive and direct about asking for money.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Es: The best advice and worst advice I’ve ever received is the same: “Be nice.” I think it’s fundamental to treat your cast and crew really well — even those only on set for a day — to be sure they feel appreciated, seen, and cared for, and that was the ethics and spirit of our production. And it feels good! That being said, I’m the director, and no one is ever going to say, “You know, the film sucked, but the director was really, really nice.”

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Es: Don’t make a film about women over 40 for your first feature unless men save the day. I’m kidding, except I’m not. That advice would work. But what I really believe is we have to tell unique, original stories that show us dimensions of women that we never get to see. When there are more of them around, the industry will get less scared of them, and they’ll recognize their success.

Also, do the extra work and hire as many women and people of color for the cast and crew as possible. It has to start with you.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Es: Chantal Akerman’s masterpiece “Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles.” I love all her films but this one — a 200 minute portrait often shot in real time, about a widowed housewife who’s also a prostitute to support her son — changed my life. Among many profound achievements it answers the question, what could a film look like if we eradicated the male gaze? Written and directed by Ackerman when she was only 25, her groundbreaking cinematic/conceptual approach has been copied endlessly by male directors.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Es: I started a feminist media blog called Who Cares About Actresses a few years ago, and have been tracking the conversation pretty carefully. I’ve been moved and excited by the all the advocacy, speaking out, critiques, and initiatives, but the reality is that the actual numbers have not changed significantly in Hollywood, only the conversation.

I was most hopeful about the Eeoc investigation into systemic discrimination in hiring practices, but now am concerned about the new administration’s impact on the agency.

Nothing is really going to change until it change across the board — more inclusive hiring practices in every area, and not just in production, but in exhibition, festival programming, and especially film criticism. This isn’t about unconscious bias. There is explicitly conscious bias when you can see that your team is comprised almost entirely of white men.

What gives me hope and keeps me inspired are the amazing films written and directed by women filmmakers that keep coming out, despite it all.

https://medium.com/media/48bd7615150804804c34be1551799aa4/href

“A Woman, a Part” Director Elisabeth Subrin on Making a Movie About a Woman Over 40 was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

The Hills Alum Whitney Port Is Pregnant With Her First Child

  • Popsugar
The Hills Alum Whitney Port Is Pregnant With Her First Child
Whitney Port is pregnant! The Hills alum shared the news via Instagram on Thursday along with a photo of herself baring her growing belly while clad in a pair of lacy underwear. "Oh hey! Just standing by the window in my underwear, with a Baby in my belly!" Whitney wrote, adding, "Dm me if you know what I'm supposed to do with this thing for how ever many years I'm supposed to be in charge." The 31-year-old covered her bump the previous night when she stepped out for Tommy Hilfiger's Spring '17 fashion show in La. It's the first child for Whitney and her husband, Tim Rosenman, who tied the knot in a stunning desert ceremony in November 2015. Whitney joins her fellow former MTV star Lauren Conrad, who is also expecting her first child with husband William Tell. Related:Whitney Port's Insanely Pretty Wedding Pictures Will Inspire Your
See full article at Popsugar »

Exclusive: Deborah Cox Talks Channeling Whitney Houston for 'Bodyguard' Tour, Says She Has Family's Blessing

Exclusive: Deborah Cox Talks Channeling Whitney Houston for 'Bodyguard' Tour, Says She Has Family's Blessing
Deborah Cox is dishing to Et about stepping into Whitney Houston's shoes for the iconic role of Rachel Marron for the national tour of The Bodyguard.

"For me, it's about bringing this to a whole new generation," Cox, 42, says. "There are so many people that don't know of the movie and the music and her songs and that kind of thing, so this is an opportunity to do that."

Read: Meet Deborah Cox, the R&B Singer Taking On Whitney Houston

Based on the 1992 blockbuster starring Houston and Kevin Costner, the stage musical follows closely to the original screenplay as singer-actress Rachel Marron hires former Secret Service agent Frank Farmer to protect her from an unknown stalker. Their relationship strays from the professional realm when they fall in love.

The production first premiered in London in 2012, but the upcoming national tour will be the first time the musical is performed in the U.S.

Cox
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

24 of the biggest and best movie power ballads

Adam Rees Nov 4, 2016

Once a blockbuster staple, the power ballad was the ultimate movie accompaniment. We look back at some of the classics...

For a glorious period from the mid-80s throughout the 90s, the biggest summer blockbusters were only worth their salt if they had an equally gargantuan song at the head their soundtrack. Often the success of one was inexorably linked to the other, with the likes of Four Weddings And A Funeral's feats matched and even exceeded by Wet Wet Wet's accompanying Love Is All Around.

The greatest and most successful songs belong to the power ballad genre, and are as emotionally charged and forceful as the gods of epic balladry such as Journey, Whitesnake, Bon Jovi and Meat Loaf. As the 90s became the 00s and the charts became increasingly irrelevant, the movie ballad became almost defunct, with even the song-dominant film soundtrack being
See full article at Den of Geek »

Film Acquisition Rundown, Week of June 20: Kino Lorber Plans Awards Push for ‘Tower,’ Factory 25 Gets Weird With ‘For the Plasma’

Keep up with the wild and wooly world of indie film acquisitions with our weekly Rundown of everything that’s been picked up around the globe. Check out last week’s Rundown here.

Kino Lorber has acquired the U.S. distribution rights to Keith Maitland’s animated documentary, “Tower.” The film explores the tragic story of America’s first mass school shooting, where a lone gunman climbed a clock tower at the University of Texas in 1966, shooting 49 people and killing 17. The film had its world premiere at SXSW 2016, where it won both the Grand Jury Prize and Audience Award for best documentary feature.

The film has also picked up awards at numerous other festivals, including Dallas International, Montclair, RiverRun, and DeadCenter Film Festival. Kino Lorber will release “Tower” theatrically on October 12 at New York’s Film Forum, to be followed by a national rollout, marking the 50th anniversary of the shooting.
See full article at Indiewire »

Photo Flash: First Look at Deborah Cox & More in World Premiere of Josephine at Asolo Rep

Asolo Rep, in collaboration with Tony Award winner Kenneth Waissman Grease, Torch Song Trilogy presents the world premiere of the new, Broadway-bound musical Josephine. Opening tonight, Friday, May 6 at 8pm, the production runs at the Mertz Theatre, located in the Fsu Center for the Performing Arts, through May 29. Grammy nominated, multi-platinum selling recording artist Deborah Cox Broadway's Aida, Jekyll amp Hyde vocals for the Whitney Houston Lifetime movie Whitney stars as the legendary African-American performer Josephine Baker. Check out a first look at the cast on stage below
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Defenders TV Podcast: Agent Carter Season 2 Episode 8 – “Edge of Mystery”

We return to the 50’s in our Agent Carter S02E08 Edge of Mystery Podcast as we discuss our top 5 points about this episode of Agent Carter with an all out battle over Zero Matter, the reunion of team Ssr and a heartbreaking scene for some of our favourite Marvel TV characters.

Synopsis for Agent Carter S02E08 Edge of Mystery Podcast

Directed by: Metin Hüseyin

Written by: Brant Englestein

An anxious Edwin Jarvis (James D’Arcy) is soon put at ease as his wife Ana (Lotte Verbeek) survives surgery and begins to recover from her gunshot wound. However, Jarvis’ relief soon turns to anger and vengeance as the Doctors inform him that Ana can no longer have children as a result of her injuries. This puts Jarvis on a collision course with Whitney Frost (Wynn Everett) as Peggy (Hayley Atwell) and Sousa (Enver Gjokaj) propose a trade with Frost
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Main Art Documents of the Year

The Main Art Documents of the Year

Environment from the Zombie panel. It had been an eventful year for craft writing, with lots of shifts inside the scenery, as new journals popped (including this 1), or sprang up. or reinvented themselves. But beneath all the institutional shuffles, what were the tips that got people excited? I interviewed peers to attempt to answer that problem, but the remaining choice below is obviously a personal one. It displays the entire world and it is weighted towards parts that echo my own personal location and my own feeling of this yr’s struggling qualities. Regardless, listed here are a number of the pieces of publishing that I think are touchstones of 2014: Holland Cotter – Complex, New York Times. Jan 17, 2014 It;s somewhat crazy if you ask me that #039 Cotter&; s fretful, sweeping express -of-the-picture item is already per year old. But it stands here
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

The Most Important Art Essays of the Entire Year

The Most Important Art Essays of the Entire Year

Setting from the Zombie Formalism screen. It had been an eventful year for craft writing, with a lot of changes while in the panorama, as new publications popped (including this 1), or sprang up. or reinvented themselves. But beneath all of the institutional shuffles, what were? I polled colleagues to try to answer that concern, nevertheless the final choice below is obviously a personal one. The entire world is reflected by it around me, and it is measured towards pieces that replicate my own area and my own personal feeling of the year’s troubled attributes. Regardless, listed here are some of publishing that I believe are touchstones of 2014 of the items: Holland Cotter, Lost in the Gallery – Sophisticated, & quot York Times. January 17, 2014 It’s a bit nuts tome that state that is sweeping, s fretful -of-the-world piece has already been per year old.
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Defenders TV Podcast: Agent Carter Season 2 Episode 6 – “Life of the Party”

The Defenders TV Podcast goes Hollywood…

To celebrate our 50th episode of Defenders TV Podcast we’re off to a soirée at the Arena Club for our Agent Carter S02E06 Life of the Party Podcast. As always we discuss our top 5 points about this weeks episode from the original Black Widow back in action to the brand new black ooze unleashed, an undercover operation for Jarvis and a brand new state of affairs for the council of nine.

Synopsis for Agent Carter S02E06 Life of the Party Podcast

Directed by: Craig Zisk

Written by: Eric Pearson

After the de-phasing of Jason Wilkes (Reggie Austin), Peggy Carter (Hayley Atwell) realises she cannot hope to save him either on her own or without more of the Zero Matter. In an attempt to stabilise Wilkes, Peggy devises a desperate plan of her own and one that requires: tapping the only remaining source of Zero Matter,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

'Kurt and Courtney' Director Preps Whitney Houston Documentary

'Kurt and Courtney' Director Preps Whitney Houston Documentary
Filmmaker Nick Broomfield — known for controversial documentaries like Kurt and Courtney and Biggie and Tupac — is helming a new film about Whitney Houston for BBC Two.

Per the network, Whitney "goes in search of the forces that made and then destroyed the singer who has been described as having one of the greatest voices of the last 50 years." A release date has yet to be announced.

While the film is still in its early stages, it doesn't have the initial support of the singer's family. Asked about the film, a
See full article at Rolling Stone »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

External Sites