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"Sherlock" The Six Thatchers (TV Episode 2017) Poster

(TV Series)

(2017)

Trivia

Jump to: Spoilers (4)
Martin Freeman and Amanda Abbington were splitting up their marriage during the filming of the episode.
In this episode, John Watson is shown driving. An ongoing joke of the series is that John doesn't end up driving any vehicles. This is a nod to the fact that Martin Freeman hadn't had a driver's license for the longest time.
At approximately 1:10:00 'Toby Jones (I)''s character Culverton Smith from Sherlock: The Lying Detective (2017) makes a cameo appearance in the advertisement on the bust stop.
The episode saw the introduction of Toby the Bloodhound, a 'character' from Arthur Conan Doyle's short story "The Sign of the Four".

Amanda Abbington complained that Dexter "wasn't the brightest dog" and that she fell over while working with him. Eventually, someone from prop department replaced Dexter to pull the characters by the dog lead on screen after his canine counterpart proved unwilling to do so.
When Mary is in Norway, two boats can be seen with the names "Flekkete Bånd" and "Løvens Manke". These names both reference, and are direct translations of "the speckled band" and "the lion's mane", two well known tales of Sherlock Holmes.
The deductions that Sherlock makes about the man with the large hands and the Japanese tattoo is similar to the deductions Sherlock Holmes makes in the original Arthur Conan Doyle story "The Red-Headed League".
Amanda Abbington shared that the scene where Toby the hound wasn't moving was based in reality because the dog hired for the role wouldn't move for fear of the crowds. Moffat and Gattis then wrote this scene into the script.
Amanda Abbington reported that the scene where Mary is speaking with an exaggerated American accent was written into the script because she and Steven Moffat regularly joke around the set by speaking in silly accents.
The title is based on "The Adventure of the Six Napoleons", one of the original Sherlock Holmes' short stories. Sherlock briefly mentions Napoleon to Culvertin Smith's daughter as a nod to that title.
Sherlock tells Mrs. Hudson to say the word "Norberry" to him if she ever thinks he is being overconfident or cocky. This is a reference to Doyle's short story "The Adventure of the Yellow Face" where Holmes tells Watson to do the same.
Both the six Margaret Thatcher statues and the Black Pearl of the Borgias are taken from the original Arthur Conan Doyle story, "The Adventure of the Six Napoleons," which appeared in The Return of Sherlock Holmes (1904).
Mycroft says that Sherlock wrote his own version of "The Appointment in Samarra" but entitled it "The Appointment in Sumatra". One of the original Conan Doyle l stories was entitled "The Rat of Sumatra". Series 3: Episode 1, The Empty Hearse was also loosely referential to this story. The Abandoned Train car in "The Empty Hearse" was abandoned in the undeveloped Train station on Sumatra street.
Among the onscreen video calls, Paul Chequer has a cameo reprisal of his role of Detective Inspector Dimmock. This is the only other appearance of his character since series 1: episode 2, The Blind Banker.
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The words "Reigate Square" appears on Mycroft's fridge. This is a reference to original Holmes story "The Adventure of the Reigate Squire".
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The case involving the client's thumb is a reference to one of the original Sherlock Holmes short story "The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb".
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The case of "The Canary Trainer" has a mention in Doyle's short story "The Adventure of Black Peter".
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When John bumps into the mystery girl off the bus, the poster in the bus shelter is of Toby Jones who appears in the next episode (#4.2) as the main antagonist.
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The story of "Appointment in Samarrah" is adapted from a short story by Rumi's (Molavi) Masnavi. It is a story about a merchant in the land of Prophet (king) Suleiman, going to the prophet asking him for help since he has seen the angel of death in the Bazaar in anger. He asks Suleiman (who could control the wind) to send him to India by wind. Suleiman does so. Suleiman saw the angel of death later and asked why he looked at that man in anger and frightened him. The angel answers that he did not look at him in anger, rather in confusion, since he was told to take the merchant's life in India and yet he was in Jerusalem.
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Mary calls Sherlock "Dragon-Slayer." In The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (2013), Benedict Cumberbatch was the voice of the dragon.
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The reference to Sherlock rewriting 'the Appointment in Samarra' to 'the Appointment in Sumatra' is a foreshadowing of the impending dangers of the forthcoming villain, Culverton Smith. In 'the Adventure of the Dying Detective', Smith is referred to as "a well-known resident of Sumatra, now visiting London."
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Amanda Root (Emma Welsborough) had a part in the The Iron Lady (2011), a biographical film about Margaret Thatcher.
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At about 1:02, a man with greying hair and a trench coat boards a bus. Referencing another detective, Columbo.
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

Mary's death is consistent with the Conan Doyle stories, however, in the original stories, it is not specified how she dies. It is only implied that John Watson is eventually made a widower by a great loss.
This episode reveals 'Mary's' real name.
The cave like building where Mary poisons Sherlock is the same as the set used for the skull cave in Doctor Who Series 6 Episode 13.
The case involving a jellyfish is a direct reference to the original Holmes story "The Adventure of the Lion's Mane"
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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