Travel to 19th century England and meet Michael Faraday, a child of poverty who grew up to invent the motor and the generator. His ideas about electricity and discovery of magnetic fields ... See full summary »

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(inspired by "Cosmos: A Personal Voyage" written by), (inspired by "Cosmos: A Personal Voyage" written by) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Episode credited cast:
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Himself - Host
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
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Electric Spark Girl
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Sir Humphry Davy (voice)
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Lab Assistant (voice)
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Einstein's Father (voice)
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Michael Faraday (voice)
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Himself (archive footage)
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Sarah Faraday
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Storyline

Travel to 19th century England and meet Michael Faraday, a child of poverty who grew up to invent the motor and the generator. His ideas about electricity and discovery of magnetic fields changed the world and paved the way for future scientists to make giant strides in the world of high technology and instantaneous communication. Written by Anonymous

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Documentary

Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

11 May 2014 (USA)  »

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16:9 HD
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Great for a class that first studies magnetism and electricity
11 February 2015 | by (Netherlands) – See all my reviews

As we are studying magnetism, electromagnetism, the electric motor, the generator and the transformer in class (secondary school), I showed the class this episode. It is excellent material, the students were watching silently. The combination of correct science, history of science and human interest is great. This episode shows very well how science is built up piece by piece, how show has played a vital role in development, how mathematics is important in physics and of course how magnetism, electricity and light are related (although the latter could have been explained in a bit more detail). Otherwise my only scientific criticism is: when the gravitational field is " shown" in the solar system, the lines that are shown are not field lines but equipotential lines. It would also have been nice to mention that the relation between electricity and magnetism was discovered by H. C. Ørsted in 1820, in Copenhagen. Makes the importance of communication in science and the international component in science stand out a bit more. But then again, this leaves some space for me as a teacher as well :)

I came across this episode because I show other episodes of this show in class where we study astrophysics. I also noticed there is one on relativity. I hope that episode is as good as this one.


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