Francofonia
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2016 | 2015

15 items from 2016


Film Review: Francofonia

9 November 2016 3:17 PM, PST | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★☆ The last time UK audience's had a chance to sample the delights of Russian director Aleksandr Sokurov was when his Golden Lion winner, the boisterous and vivid interpretation of Goethe's Faust was released in 2012. He now returns with Francofonia, a chatty and occasionally brilliant rumination on art, history and death. Like Prospero, Sokurov himself is locked in his cell, his cluttered Parisian apartment, surrounded by his art books, his post it notes stuck to his Apple computer as he mutters away about the theme of his film. The camera like Ariel swoops and glides beautifully through Paris to his unifying theme - the Louvre, the objective correlative for all of the director's preoccupation with art.

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- CineVue UK

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Movie Review – Francofonia (2015)

9 November 2016 11:20 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Francofonia, 2015.

Directed by Aleksandr Sokurov.

Starring Louis-Do de Lencquesaing, Benjamin Utzerath and Vincent Nemeth.

Synopsis:

A multi-faceted documentary feature concentrating on both the history  of the Louvre museum in Paris during the Nazi occupation and a study on the timelessness and human value of art.

Francofonia from writer and director Aleksandr Sokurov (Russian Ark) is an inspiring and deeply affecting study of the meaning of art, humanity and memory. Making use of a strikingly original narrative template, the story veers around the entire structure of the Louvre museum in Paris, taking in its history, and specifically, but not exclusively, the building’s experience of Paris’s Nazi occupation during World War 2.

As with Russian Ark, that famous one-take feature, this is art that is not enabled by a quick pitch or solid beginning, middle and end. This is culture and life ringing out as clear as day, and Sokurov’s »

- Robert W Monk

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New to Streaming: ‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘The Innocents,’ ‘Complete Unknown,’ ‘Steve Jobs,’ and More

30 September 2016 9:53 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Complete Unknown (Joshua Marston)

Armed with two top-notch leads and a compelling premise, Joshua Marston‘s third feature, Complete Unknown, spends a lot of time hinting at which direction it will go, without going anywhere at all. Tom (Michael Shannon) is living with his wife Rehema (Azita Ghanizada) in New York City, spending the majority of his days drafting agricultural policy emails in a cramped government office. It is »

- The Film Stage

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Venice: Why 'Brimstone' producer needed "balls of steel" and how it helped 'Game Of Thrones'

1 September 2016 11:52 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Guy Pearce and Dakota Fanning star alongside Game Of Thrones co-stars Kit Harrington and Carice van Houten.

Brimstone director Martin Koolhoven says that his producer Els Vandevorst (Francofonia) has “balls of steel.”

Listen to Vandevorst’s own account of her seven year journey to guide Koolhoven’s €12m revenge western to screen and you quickly get a sense of what he means.

Koolhoven first started talking about the project (starring Guy Pearce, Dakota Fanning, Carice van Houten and Kit Harington) when he was making his Dutch language Second World War film, Winter In Wartime (2008). At the time, Vandevorst warned him that he was too busy with his current projects to devote any time to it.

Winter In Wartime was a box office hit in the Netherlands but didn’t have the international festival exposure that the filmmakers had hoped. However, Vandevorst encouraged the director to be as ambitious as possible. She and the »

- geoffrey@macnab.demon.co.uk (Geoffrey Macnab)

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Venice: Why 'Brimstone''s producer needed "balls of steel" and how it helped 'Game Of Thrones'

1 September 2016 11:52 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Guy Pearce and Dakota Fanning star alongside Game Of Thrones co-stars Kit Harrington and Carice van Houten.

Brimstone director Martin Koolhoven says that his producer Els Vandevorst (Francofonia) has “balls of steel.”

Listen to Vandevorst’s own account of her seven year journey to guide Koolhoven’s €12m revenge western to screen and you quickly get a sense of what he means.

Koolhoven first started talking about the project (starring Guy Pearce, Dakota Fanning, Carice van Houten and Kit Harington) when he was making his Dutch language Second World War film, Winter In Wartime (2008). At the time, Vandevorst warned him that he was too busy with his current projects to devote any time to it.

Winter In Wartime was a box office hit in the Netherlands but didn’t have the international festival exposure that the filmmakers had hoped. However, Vandevorst encouraged the director to be as ambitious as possible. She and the »

- geoffrey@macnab.demon.co.uk (Geoffrey Macnab)

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New to Streaming: ‘Green Room,’ Albert Brooks, ‘Cemetery of Splendor,’ and More

1 July 2016 8:39 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Films of Albert Brooks

We can think of no better way to celebrate the holiday weekend then curling up with the hilarious, often touching films of Albert Brooks. All of his directorial features — Real Life, Modern Romance, Lost in America, Defending Your Life, Mother, The Muse, and Looking For Comedy in a Muslim World — have now been added to Netflix. What are you waiting for? »

- The Film Stage

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'Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice' Extended Cut, Plus This Week's New Digital HD and VOD Releases

28 June 2016 4:30 PM, PDT | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Our resident VOD expert tells you what's new to rent and/or own this week via various Digital HD providers such as cable Movies On Demand, Amazon, iTunes, Vudu, Google Play and, of course, Netflix. Cable Movies On Demand: Same-day-as-disc releases, older titles and pretheatrical exclusives for rent, priced from $3-$10, in 24- or 48-hour periods Kung Fu Panda 3 (animated sequel; voices: Jack Black, Bryan Cranston; rated PG) Whiskey Tango Foxtrot (drama-comedy; Tina Fey, Margot Robbie; rated R) Eye in the Sky (drama-thriller; Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul; rated R) Francofonia (documentary-drama about the Louvre during the Nazi occupation; Vincent Nemeth, Johanna Korthals; not rated)   Digital HD: Rent from $4-$7 or own from $13-$20 (HD may cost more than...

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- Robert B. DeSalvo

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Francofonia Movie Review

5 April 2016 10:35 PM, PDT | ShockYa | See recent ShockYa news »

Francofonia (Le Louvre sous l’occupation) Music Box Films Reviewed by: Harvey Karten, Shockya, d-based on Rotten Tomatoes Grade: B Director:  Aleksandr Sokurov Written by: Aleksandr Sokurov     Cast: Louis-Do de Lencquesaing, Benjamin Utzerath, Vincent Nemeth, Johanna Korthals Altes, Andrey Chelpanov Screened at: Review 2, NYC, 3/16/16 Opens: April 1, 2016 If someone told you that a Nazi officer, a high-level man from the contingent of Germans occupying Paris during the early days of the Second World War, would ultimately be awarded France’s highest honor, you wouldn’t believe him.  You might wonder if he’s a guy like Oskar Schindler, given a hero’s treatment in Steven Spielberg’s “Schindler’s List, but Franz Wolff-Metternich  [ Read More ]

The post Francofonia Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com. »

- Harvey Karten

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‘Vaxxed’ Bows In NYC, ’Miles Ahead’ Sprints In Debut & ‘Everybody Wants Some!!’ Gets Some: Specialty Box Office

3 April 2016 11:18 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Don Cheadle's Miles Ahead from Sony Classics hit a high note atop the Specialty Box Office chart this very crowded weekend, with the competition holding its own. Paramount launched Richard Linklater's Everybody Wants Some!! to a solid $17K average in 19 theaters, and the fresh-off-a-mini-media frenzy Vaxxed grossed $22K at the Angelika in New York. Music Box's Francofonia had a good start in two locations, and China Lion's Congqing Hot Pot brought in the crowds in 20… »

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Aleksandr Sokurov: "Cinema does not have any achievements"

10 March 2016 1:40 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The Golden Lion-winning filmmaker discussed his ambivalent relationship with cinema, his stormy friendship with Tarkovsky and the merit of actors, during a Qumra masterclass.

Aleksandr Sokurov is participating in the Doha Film Institute’s Qumra event this week as one of its five ‘Qumra Masters’. During his masterclass at Doha’s Museum of Islamic Art on Tuesday, a rapt audience listened to the Russian film-maker wax lyrical on his deep love for literature, his close friendship with Andrei Tarkovsky, and his strong moral outlook on romanticised violence in film.

It was an often provocative talk in which Sokurov, whose feature credits include Russian Ark, Venice Golden Lion winner Faust, Francofonia, Moloch and Mother And Son, outlined his strong belief that film is a lesser artform, particularly when compared against great literature.

“I’ve never thought of cinema as something big,” said Sokurov, setting out his stall right at the beginning. “I don’t think »

- matt.mueller@screendaily.com (Matt Mueller)

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Redford, Segel, and Mara Make ‘The Discovery,’ Sokurov Plans World War II Comedy, and More

9 March 2016 10:16 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Following one casting switch and one addition, Charlie McDowell‘s The Discovery is preparing to set forth. The One I Love helmer’s second feature was originally set to star Rooney Mara and Nicholas Hoult, but a recent report tells us the latter’s departed for Xavier Dolan’s The Death and Life of John F. Donovan; stepping into his place is Jason Segel, while Robert Redford‘s been cast in a key role. [THR]

As we learned last fall, the project, scripted by McDowell and Justin Lader, tracks a love story set one year after science has proven the afterlife’s existence. While millions commit suicide, “believing that [it] is like pushing a reset button,” the man (Segal) whose father (Redford) discovered the afterlife meets and falls in love with a woman (Mara) “whose life is tinged by a tragic past.”

Endgame and Protagonist Pictures are financing The Discovery, which will roll cameras this month. »

- Nick Newman

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U.S. Trailer for Aleksandr Sokurov’s ‘Francofonia’ Brings the Louvre to Life

2 March 2016 11:35 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Although the basic set-up of Aleksandr Sokurov‘s Francofonia recalls his groundbreaking Russian Ark — still the director’s best-known film — reactions indicate we’re dealing with an altogether different, no less worthwhile work. Imagining conversations between Jacques Jaujard, Director of the French National Museums during the Nazi occupation, and the Third Reich’s artistic representative, Franz Graf Wolff-Metternich, his latest project takes us through one of the world’s most-respected museums to consider the extent to which we can (or should) appreciate and protect art.

For most, the results have proven satisfying. As we said in our review out of last year’s Venice International Film Festival, “There’s a constant tension at work here, both historical and political, with Sokurov patiently bringing Russian Ark back into the fold in unexpected ways and getting to the very issue of what it means to be European. And that, in light of »

- Nick Newman

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Watch: New Trailer For 'Russian Ark' Director Alexander Sokurov's Louvre-Set 'Francofonia'

2 March 2016 10:20 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

For casual cinephiles, Alexander Sokurov's "Russian Ark" is the movie that's perhaps the biggest point of reference in the director's filmography. The 2002 picture saw the filmmaker dance through the Russian State Hermitage Museum in a single unbroken take, and for his latest picture, "Francofonia," he once again uses a house of the arts as the setting of his picture.  Read More: Review: Alexander Sokurov's Odd, Dense & Bizarre 'Faust' Starring Louis-Do de Lencquesaing, Benjamin Utzerath, Vincent Nemeth, Johanna Korthals Altes, Jean-Claude Caër, and Andrey Chelpanov, and mixing documentary and dramatization, the Louvre-set picture tells the story of Jacques Jaujard and Count Franziskus Wolff-Metternich, who worked at the museum during the Nazi occupation. Here's the synopsis:  Set against the backdrop of the Louvre Museum’s history and artworks, master director Alexander Sokurov (Russian Ark) applies his uniquely »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Joshua Reviews Alexander Sokurov’s Francofonia [Piff 2016]

15 February 2016 8:00 AM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

As cinema progresses as an art, more and more filmmakers are jettisoning normal ideas of narrative and pushing what boundaries there may appear to be on the definition of “cinema.” Even looking at this year’s Portland International Film Festival, you have filmmakers like Ben Rivers and Peter Greenaway who have no interest in classical narrative tropes. And then there is one of world cinema’s foremost boundary-pushers, Alexander Sokurov, who is back with one of his most entrancing and yet oddly accessible experiments to date.

Entitled Francofonia, Sokurov’s latest finds him delving back into the world of art and a nation’s history, but this time leaving Russia as seen in Russian Ark and arriving in Paris, focusing his lens on The Louvre. In a similar vein to a film like Frederick Wiseman’s National Gallery, Sokurov takes what sounds like well tread ground and brings to it »

- Joshua Brunsting

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Rotterdam 2016 Review: Francofonia Shows All Is Fair In Art, Except War

2 February 2016 2:00 AM, PST | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

When you look at his filmography, it is no secret that Russian director Aleksandr Sokurov loves history and art, and most of his works are meditations on those two subjects. One of his most heralded films, Russian Ark, was a technical tour-de-force taking place in Leningrad's astounding Hermitage museum, and was a voyage through all what happened in (or to) Russia in recent centuries. Now, with his visual thesis Francofonia, Sokurov points his gaze at one of the other most famous museums in the world: the Louvre in Paris. But rather than use that building as a fixed point to show the history of France, Sokurov muses about art in general, its use to people, and the sacrifices we must be willing to make to...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

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2016 | 2015

15 items from 2016


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