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The Editing Room: Lost and Found (2007)

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(as Timothy Cutt)
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James Owsley ...
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John Dunn ...
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11 September 2007 (USA)  »

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1.78 : 1
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This brief featurette is featured on MGM's 2007 DVD release for From Beyond (1986), as well as Shout! Factory's 2013 Blu-ray release. See more »

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Features From Beyond (1986) See more »

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Saving From Beyond
11 May 2015 | by See all my reviews

The Editing Room: Lost and Found (2007)

*** 1/2 (out of 4)

This five-minute featurette doesn't last very long but it's certainly highly entertaining. Director Stuart Gordon talks about the MPAA cutting his film FROM BEYOND and how originally it was thought the extra footage was lost. When putting the DVD together, James Owsley and John Dunn were put in charge of taking a very bad looking workprint and trying to color correct it, clean it and get it back into the picture so that a true uncut version could be seen by the fans. This is certainly very entertaining as it gives you a behind-the-scenes look at the work that has to be done in order to save some of this bad footage and make it presentable enough to where you can include it on a release. Gordon also tells some great stories about the original edits to the film. Fans of FROM BEYOND won't ever have to watch the R-rated version again and it's fun to see how it was destroyed in favor of the director's cut.


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