7.2/10
98
4 user 9 critic

Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People (2014)

A film that explores how African American communities have used the camera as a tool for social change from the invention of photography to the present. This epic tale poetically moves ... See full summary »
4 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Credited cast:
Arthé Anthony ...
Herself
Anthony Barboza ...
Himself
Hugh Bell ...
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David G. Berger ...
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Dawoud Bey ...
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Sheila Pree Bright ...
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Marcus Bruce ...
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Michael Chambers ...
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Albert Chong ...
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Lisa Gail Collins ...
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Bridget Cooks ...
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Adger W. Cowans ...
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Renee Cox ...
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C. Daniel Dawson ...
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Jonathan Eubanks ...
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Storyline

A film that explores how African American communities have used the camera as a tool for social change from the invention of photography to the present. This epic tale poetically moves between the present and the past, through contemporary photographers and artists whose images and stories seek to reconcile legacies of pride and shame while giving voice to images long suppressed, forgotten, and hidden from sight. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

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Details

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Release Date:

17 January 2014 (USA)  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$11,764 (USA) (29 August 2014)

Gross:

$65,169 (USA) (23 January 2015)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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User Reviews

 
An extraordinary documentary and photographic odyssey
20 January 2015 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Thank you Thomas Allen Harris. I saw your film last night and the theatre was packed with an incredibly diverse crowd of native people, black and white folk, students, educators, an Italian playwright, old couples, interracial couples, lgbt community, elders... people sighing, cringing, crying, sitting on the edge of their seats, eyes transfixed to the screen. This is an extraordinary documentary. Shifting the gravitational field and critical frame of how we see ourselves and our shared history. An excavation of countless unseen images and unacknowledged photographers, a massive archive from the Civil War, Reconstruction and Civil Rights eras...It was so heart-felt. So brave. Raw. Tender. Vulnerable. Relentless. It's challenging to articulate everything I felt while watching this film. But I just want to thank you for opening your journey to us. For creating epiphanies in our eyes, hearts and minds. For weaving together so many lost stories and lives. For your ambition, passion and breathtaking skill. For illuminating the invisible, unseen and unheard.


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