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Psycho's Sister: Making 'The Name of the Game Is Kill' (2013)

Retrospective documentary on the making of the 1968 cult classic "The Name of the Game Is Kill!".

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Jeff Burr ...
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Gary Crutcher ...
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Tim Lucas ...
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Stu Phillips ...
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Retrospective documentary on the making of the 1968 cult classic "The Name of the Game Is Kill!".

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Documentary

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2013 (USA)  »

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$200 (estimated)
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Connections

References Hawaii Five-O (1968) See more »

Soundtracks

Shadows
Written by Michael Z. Gordon (as Mike Gordon) and Stu Phillips
Performed by The Electric Prunes
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Nifty retrospective documentary
12 January 2015 | by (The Last New Jersey Drive-In on the Left) – See all my reviews

This 46-minute documentary offers a quite interesting and informative chronicle on the making of the offbeat late 60's cult thriller "The Name of the Game Is Kill!". Screenwriter Gary Crutcher tells some of the best stories: The Terry family was based on an oddball family of women in Hollywood that he got involved with (one of them was a hand model for actress Pier Angeli), both Curtis Harrington and Roman Polanski were attached to the project as directors (Polanski wanted to change the lead male character from a Hungarian refugee to a Polish one), director Gunnar Hellstrom came up with the idea of casting female impersonator TC Jones as the mother, and Jack Lord had a pompous attitude which not surprisingly clashed with Hellstrom throughout the shooting of the picture. Cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond likewise reveals that he had great difficulty getting along with Hellstrom and talks about how he began his career in America shooting educational documentaries. Joe Dante notes how he first saw the film at a grindhouse theater in Philadelphia and reviewing it for the fanzine Castle of Frankenstein while filmmaker and historian Jeff Burr provides neat background information on various cast and crew members. Tim Lucas also makes some nice observations about the story and themes in the movie. Composer Stu Phillips points out that he primarily used electrified instruments for his score while James Lowe talks about specifically writing and recording the song "Shadows" for the movie. Worth a watch for fans of the film.


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