6.9/10
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1 user 1 critic

Boredom (2012)

Believe it or not this is the first serious documentary on boredom. Director Albert Nerenberg (LAUGHOLOGY, STUPIDITY) asks why the subject of boredom has been so religiously avoided and shows that boredom isn't what you think it is.

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Jon Bradley ...
Himself (Professor, McGill University)
Alan Caruba ...
Himself (Director, Boredom Institute)
Colleen Merrifield ...
Herself (Boredom Researcher)
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Believe it or not this is the first serious documentary on boredom. Director Albert Nerenberg (LAUGHOLOGY, STUPIDITY) asks why the subject of boredom has been so religiously avoided and shows that boredom isn't what you think it is.

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psychology | boredom | See All (2) »

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2012 (Canada)  »

Also Known As:

Ikävystymisen olemus  »

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User Reviews

 
Laced With Deadpan Humor & Makes You Think
5 March 2015 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This documentary, at just a little over an hour in length, takes a half-serious and half tongue-in-cheek look at boredom in our society. It's written and narrated by Canadian filmmaker Albert Neremberg (Laughology, Stupidity) who also appears in many of the film's scenes seeking answers about boredom.

The term "bored to death" may not be as far-fetched as one might think, as the doc cites more than one study showing how bored people may die at a younger age due to various factors. Boredom can also possibly lead to addiction, risky behaviors, and even rioting (called recreational violence--which is quite the dumb moniker).

We live in a screen addicted society with the mass prevalence of smartphones, desktops, laptops, tablets, video games, TV, movies, or even just walking down 42nd Street in New York City. However, Neremberg makes the point, with interviews and studies, that this attempt to relieve our boredom may actually be doing more harm than good, giving us more stress and isolation from others in society.

There are some very funny parts to the movie, such as seeing on national TV some guests who fall asleep even before the first question is asked of them (one of whom is Newt Gingrich). There's also an interview with the self proclaimed head of the The Boring Institute Alan Caruba, who also happens to be it's only member.

In summary, to be honest, the film can get a little repetitious and thus boring in spots, but overall I found it to be an interesting, unique, and sometimes humorous doc that made me open my mind to think about the topic.


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