Not since before Roe v. Wade has access to choice encountered so many hurdles across so many US states. 2011 and 2012 saw a record-breaking number of abortion restrictions passed throughout... See full summary »
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Cast

Credited cast:
Shelley Abrams
Victoria Cobb
Rosemary Codding
Ramey Connelly
Jim Edmondson
David Englin
Chris Freund
Meredith Harbach
Janet Howell
Tarina Keene
Bob Marshall
Jordan Romeo
Molly Vick
Katherine Waddell
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Not since before Roe v. Wade has access to choice encountered so many hurdles across so many US states. 2011 and 2012 saw a record-breaking number of abortion restrictions passed throughout the country. One of the states that led the charge was Virginia. With Virginia legislators attempting to pass everything from a Personhood amendment to transvaginal ultrasounds, Virginia quickly became ground zero in the fight for a woman's right to choose. Political Bodies documents the 3 pieces of legislation surrounding the debate, the legislators involved and the swift response from the women of Virginia. The film explores what happens when citizens fight for their reproductive rights and the determination it takes to stand up to one's government. Featured interviews from pro-choice activists including Shelley Abrams, Molly Vick, Tarina Keene and Rosemary Codding; pro-choice political figures including Katherine Waddell, Janet Howell, Jim Edmondson, David Englin; and pro-life politicians and ... Written by Anonymous

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24 October 2013 (USA)  »

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A Solid Documentary on an Important Subject
25 October 2013 | by (Austin, TX, United States) – See all my reviews

This documentary on the 2012 efforts to restrict abortion in Virginia premiered at the Austin Film Festival just blocks away from the Texas State Capitol where similar efforts unfolded in dramatic fashion around Wendy Davis's filibuster just a few months ago. Virginia could have been seen as a preview of what happened here in Texas. The film walks the line between documentary and advocacy. The film maker presents the dramatic events in Virginia in a reasonably fair manner, but his sympathies are clearly with the abortion advocates and providers. There are many more minutes of air time from the pro-choice advocates than the pro-life advocates; however, this is at least partly due to the fact that only 2 of the pro-life advocates were willing to be interviewed for the film. They certainly get to present their views, but it hard to say that they are presented in a way that most people would see them as sympathetic characters. They often come off as extremists. Of course, the viewer has to determine if that is fair way to understand them. The film is well-organized, entertaining, and informative about the latest phase of America's endless battle over abortion. The film is worthwhile for those wishing to better understand some of the complexity of this issue, but it should not be seen as fully objective. On the other hand, it hard to find anything that is fully objective on this issue.


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