6.6/10
4,483
24 user 9 critic

Turks & Caicos (2014)

Warricker is a retired spy living in the Caribbean. He realizes he is in trouble when four "businessmen" show up. They look like mob bosses, but one actually works for the CIA. He gets help from two former MI5 colleagues back in London.

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3 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Hansel Piper ...
Aldous Helier
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Julie Hewlett ...
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Sally Greenwood ...
Singer
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Rollo Maverley
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Colin Maitlis
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Clare Clovis
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Storyline

Johnny Worricker is hiding out from his work at MI5 on the tax-exile islands, Turks & Caicos. But an encounter with a CIA agent forces him into the company of some ambiguous American businessmen who claim to be on the islands for a conference on the global financial crisis. When one of them falls in the sea, then it's their financial PR who seems to know more than she's letting on. But will she help Johnny come to an understanding of what these men do and why they're here? Written by DemonMeister

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Plot Keywords:

island | cia | mi5 | escrow | account | See All (37) »


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TV-PG | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

9 November 2014 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Turks and Caicos  »

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2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The name given by Johnny Worricker for his imaginary father, 'Clifford', is the real name of the father of the film's writer, David Hare. See more »

Goofs

About 45:00, Bill Nighy's sunglasses disappear between shots while he's sitting at a table with Winona Ryder. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Curtis Pelissier: OK, here we are.
Melanie Fall: Well, what a great evening. Thank you.
Curtis Pelissier: If you want, I could come in, pour you a drink.
Melanie Fall: Tell you the problem, I'm not thirsty. But I had a great time. Thank you.
Curtis Pelissier: Good night.
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Connections

Follows Page Eight (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

The Great Pretender
(uncredited)
By Buck Ram
Performed by The Platters
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User Reviews

 
Talking shop
23 March 2014 | by See all my reviews

David Hare's 'Turcs and Caicos' is a low key drama about international intelligence, dodgy businessmen and corrupt politicians. Bill Nighy plays a renegade gentleman spy who is strangely irresistible to women half his age; Helena Bonham Cater, meanwhile, is simply too glamorous to be serious in her role. Almost all of the key plot developments occur off-screen, and, as with most of Hare's work, there's a lot of talking around the subject that never quite gets to the point. What saves it is the quality of that talk: it's theatrical, but there's a beautiful rhythm to it. To compare it to the work of another playwright named David, namely David Mamet, the dialogue is a lot less stylised, but easier on the ear, almost poetic in places. And this is enough to make the piece stand out from the vast majority of contemporary drama.


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