Perception (2012–2015)
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Ch-Ch-Changes 

Pierce is hired to determine the competency of a convicted murderer who has been granted a new trial. After examining the killer, who had subsequently suffered a brain injury and now ... See full summary »

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(created by) (as Ken Biller), (created by) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Kate Moretti
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Caroline Newsome / Natalie Vincent
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Max Lewicki
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Paul Haley
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Billy Flynn
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Alan Kendricks
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Charlie Kendricks
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Vernon Hill
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Joseph Garcia
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Judge Leslie Markway
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Rueben Bauer
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Donnie Ryan
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Jury Foreman
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Sara
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Storyline

Pierce is hired to determine the competency of a convicted murderer who has been granted a new trial. After examining the killer, who had subsequently suffered a brain injury and now exhibits a completely changed personality, Pierce asserts that he is essentially no longer the same person and should no longer be held accountable for the murder. His work puts him at odds with the new prosecutor Donnie Ryan, who doesn't like the fact that Pierce is interfering with his case, or that he is such good friends with Kate, his soon to be ex-wife. Written by A Dude Named Dude

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TV-MA | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

25 June 2013 (USA)  »

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The title comes from the lyrics of the song "Changes" by David Bowie, which feature the famous stutter during the refrain (e.g., "Ch-ch-Changes / Oh, look out, you rock 'n rollers..."). See more »

Goofs

At the beginning of the show, Daniel is showing a film to his class using a 16mm projector. His assistant stops the film without turning off the projector lamp, using it like a film strip to continually show a picture of Frankenstein's monster. Projector lamps get very hot, and film is notoriously flammable. Just a few seconds of projecting through a stopped film would result in burning through that frame--the classic picture of the film burning and breaking would appear on the screen. See more »

Connections

Features Frankenstein (1931) See more »

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