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Downward Dog Cancelled at ABC

1 hour ago | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Downward Dog is headed to the TV doghouse: ABC has cancelled the canine-centered sitcom after one season.

Related2017 Renewal Scorecard: What’s Coming Back? What’s Getting Cancelled? What’s on the Bubble?

The news was confirmed by a tweet from co-creator Samm Hodges, who called the cancellation “very surprising” and insisted “we are committed to finding a new home” for the freshman series:

Hey. Statement from @m_killen and I. Love and hope and not giving up #DownwardDog pic.twitter.com/VUn8NrgdLu

Samm Hodges (@sammhodges) June 23, 2017

RelatedDownward Dog: Is Allison Tolman’s New ABC Comedy Fetching? »

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'Downward Dog' Canceled at ABC

1 hour ago | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

ABC is not moving ahead with Downward Dog.

The comedy starring Fargo breakout Allison Tolman has been canceled after one season, creator Samm Hodges revealed on Twitter.

Despite glowing reviews and a strong reception at the Sundance Film Festival, where it became the first broadcast comedy series to bow, the series had a challenging time cutting through the reality-heavy clutter this summer and has averaged only a 0.7 in the demo. With cast options expiring June 30, ABC was forced to make a decision now on the series.

"Got the very surprising news that ABC is not moving »

- Lesley Goldberg

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Was Orphan Black Off Its Clone Game? Another Wayward Sis for Supernatural? Twin Peaks Hint Pays Off? And More Qs

7 hours ago | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

We’ve got questions, and you’ve (maybe) got answers! With another week of TV gone by, we’re lobbing queries left and right about shows including Orphan Black, Better Call Saul, Supernatural and Pretty Little Liars!

1 | Regarding Reign‘s series-ending time jump, TVLine reader Melissa asks, “21 years later… and they never aged?”

RelatedReign Boss Reveals [Spoiler]’s Tragic Finale Fate: ‘He Did Not Survive’

2 | Was Orphan Black‘s Sarah/M.K. convo a rare instance of clone eyelines not matching up? Or are we being too nitpicky? (They did flawlessly exchange clothes.)

3 | It was only for a fictional Veep episode, »

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‘The Leftovers’ & ‘Fargo’ Star Carrie Coon Joins Steve McQueen’s ‘Widows’

7 hours ago | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Carrie Coon has made quite a name for herself on the small screen recently. Her roles in “Fargo” and “The Leftovers” are putting her in the Emmy discussion. Now, it seems, she’s ready to make that transition to the big screen, and she’s signed up for her next big film. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Coon will soon begin production on “Widows.”

Widows” is based on the 1980’s British TV series about a group of armed robbers who are killed during a heist attempt.

Continue reading ‘The Leftovers’ & ‘Fargo’ Star Carrie Coon Joins Steve McQueen’s ‘Widows’ at The Playlist. »

- Charles Dean

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Fargo season 3 episode 4 review: The Narrow Escape Problem

16 hours ago | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Michael Noble Jun 23, 2017

Is there any escape in Fargo season 3? Here's our spoiler-filled review of episode 4...

This review contains spoilers.

See related  The Crystal Maze 2017: 12 changes from the original The Crystal Maze 2017: the long journey to bringing it back

3.4 The Narrow Escape Problem

The narrow escape problem is a term borrowed from biology that refers to a particle that is confined to a bounded domain, but which has a narrow window through which it can escape. Calculating the mean escape time is the the problem that our intrepid biologists seek to solve. (Before you start wondering whether I cribbed that from Wikipedia, let me tell you that yes, that’s exactly what I did and I freely admit so here in a vain effort to indemnify myself against accusations of cheating. You can correct me in the comments). What I can tell you is that, for the admitted layperson, »

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Fargo: Season Four? FX Ep Says, "Don't Tell People This Is the End"

19 hours ago | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

Fargo just ended its third season last night, but will there be a fourth season? Creator Noah Hawley spoke with Deadline about the possibility of another season for the FX TV show.Season three of the anthology drama takes place in 2010 and follows the sibling rivalry between Emmit (Ewan McGregor) the “Parking Lot King of Minnesota,” and his younger brother Ray Stussy (also McGregor), a pot-bellied parole officer. The cast also includes Carrie Coon, Michael Stuhlbarg, David Thewlis, Goran Bogdan, Andy Yu, and Mary Elizabeth Winstead.Read More… »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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Fargo’s Carrie Coon Joins Steve McQueen’s Heist Film Widows

22 June 2017 4:59 PM, PDT | ScreenRant.com | See recent Screen Rant news »

Steve McQueen's upcoming heist thriller Widows casts Fargo and The Leftovers star Carrie Coon as one of the titular widows. »

- Dusty Stowe

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How ‘The Beguiled’ Star Kirsten Dunst Took Control of Her Career by Owning Her Taste for Depressives, Smart Directors, and Powerful TV

22 June 2017 3:03 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Kirsten Dunst, who steals the show from Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell in Cannes director-winner Sofia Coppola’s Civil War potboiler “The Beguiled” (June 23, Focus Features). It’s her fourth collaboration with Coppola.

Bottom Line: Dunst steered toward playing strong women from an early age, with films that include political comedy “Dick” with Michelle Williams, John Stockwell’s “Crazy/Beautiful” with Jay Hernandez, and Peyton Reed and Jessica Bendinger’s cheerleader sleeper “Bring It On,” shot the year she graduated from Los Angeles’ Catholic high school Notre Dame. She has never settled for The Girlfriend or romantic lead, although she made a memorable Mary Jane Watson in the “Spider-Man” franchise. “Looking back, I’m proud of the choices that I’ve made,” she said. “A long career is up to you. It’s your barometer of taste and the choices you make as an actress inform how other people look at you and if they want you in their movies. So you have to be wise.”

Career Peaks: A model from the age of three, the child actress shot out of a cannon when she won a worldwide search for 11-year-old Claudia, starring opposite Tom Cruise and Brad Pitt in “Interview with the Vampire,” Neil Jordan’s fabulously kinky 1994 take on the Anne Rice classic. Dunst has long leaned into women’s subjects and directors, from Gillian Armstrong and Robin Swicord’s “Little Women” and Leslye Hedland’s raucous “Bachelorette,” to Coppola’s Cannes breakout “The Virgin Suicides,” shot when she was 16.

That film marked her segue to more adult roles. “I was sexualized,” Dunst told me, “but through her lens, which was such a wonderful way to be transitioned. There was nothing grotesque, even though I was doing things in that film that I was uncomfortable doing. I’d stress out about ‘Oh, I have to make out with that boy on the roof,’ but Sofia would just have me nuzzle into the side of their face. Even though I was blossoming, it was not something I was comfortable with yet. She really opened that door for me.”

Dunst went on to star for Coppola as a coquettish queen in the title role “Marie Antoinette,” and cameoed in “The Bling Ring.”

Assets: Beyond sexual allure, Dunst brings depth and mystery. She can play the girl next door (“Spider-Man”), a drunk bride peeing on the lawn in the moonlight in her wedding dress (“Melancholia”), an imperious 18th-century queen (“Marie Antoinette”), or a racist Nasa administrator (“Hidden Figures”). She has a steely edge, as well as a wicked sense of humor. Her career pivot came before 2010 Ryan Gosling two-hander “All Good Things,” when she started to meet with acting coach/therapist Greta Seacat (who also works with Coppola).

While Dunst always picks projects based on directors, she credits Seacat with a total game change “in terms of acting and how I approach things,” said Dunst. “And now it’s all about me. It’s cathartic for me. It’s my thing, it’s my experience, it’s nothing about pleasing anyone else but myself. And it all comes from me, so I have so much more control than anybody else; it’s all about my own inner life. By the time I get to set, I’m so prepared no one needs to direct me. No one needs to tell me anything. I feel so powerful with what I have to bring, that making movies is for myself now and it’s like getting rid of poisons. Like if you went to a therapist all the time, but I get to do it by acting out anything I want to, so that’s a powerful tool.”

She draws the line at too much nudity, and turned down a sexy role in another Lars von Trier movie. “I would work with him again,” she said. “It just depends on the part because he loves exposing… like Charlotte Gainsbourg, she has a less curvaceous body, so it’s less assaulting to see than if someone with larger breasts and more womanly-shaped did some of the things she did in movies.”

Biggest Problem: As she has come into a strong sense of her own identity, Dunst is making career choices for herself, not her fans. She’s not looking to please anyone else or playing the movie-star game, as evidenced by her maverick choices, from “Melancholia” to “Fargo.” “Only Lars and Pedro Almodovar write these incredible, messy roles for women,” she has said.

Awards Attention: She won Best Actress at Cannes for her hilariously depressed bride in Lars von Trier’s comedic end-of-the-world tragedy, “Melancholia,” after being quick enough on her feet to survive a disastrous Cannes press conference when her director went off the rails. While she earned plaudits and a Golden Globe nomination for Season Two of “Fargo” as the deeply flawed murderess Peggy Blumquist, she’s never earned an Oscar nomination. “The Beguiled” could be her first — she’s earning raves across the board.

Next page: Dunst scribes her character in “The Beguiled”: “Edwina would be me at my worst, working on a film that I don’t want to be on.”

Related storiesAna Lily Amirpour Responds to Racism Charges -- But Won't Apologize For Making You UncomfortableHow Controversies Can Hurt Movies Before They're Released -- IndieWire's Movie Podcast (Screen Talk Episode 154)'The Beguiled' Exclusive: Here's What It's Like to Work On A Sofia Coppola Set -- Watch »

- Anne Thompson

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How ‘The Beguiled’ Star Kirsten Dunst Took Control of Her Career by Owning Her Taste for Depressives, Smart Directors, and Powerful TV

22 June 2017 3:03 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Kirsten Dunst, who steals the show from Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell in Cannes director-winner Sofia Coppola’s Civil War potboiler “The Beguiled” (June 23, Focus Features). It’s her fourth collaboration with Coppola.

Bottom Line: Dunst steered toward playing strong women from an early age, with films that include political comedy “Dick” with Michelle Williams, John Stockwell’s “Crazy/Beautiful” with Jay Hernandez, and Peyton Reed and Jessica Bendinger’s cheerleader sleeper “Bring It On,” shot the year she graduated from Los Angeles’ Catholic high school Notre Dame. She has never settled for The Girlfriend or romantic lead, although she made a memorable Mary Jane Watson in the “Spider-Man” franchise. “Looking back, I’m proud of the choices that I’ve made,” she said. “A long career is up to you. It’s your barometer of taste and the choices you make as an actress inform how other people look at you and if they want you in their movies. So you have to be wise.”

Career Peaks: A model from the age of three, the child actress shot out of a cannon when she won a worldwide search for 11-year-old Claudia, starring opposite Tom Cruise and Brad Pitt in “Interview with the Vampire,” Neil Jordan’s fabulously kinky 1994 take on the Anne Rice classic. Dunst has long leaned into women’s subjects and directors, from Gillian Armstrong and Robin Swicord’s “Little Women” and Leslye Hedland’s raucous “Bachelorette,” to Coppola’s Cannes breakout “The Virgin Suicides,” shot when she was 16.

That film marked her segue to more adult roles. “I was sexualized,” Dunst told me, “but through her lens, which was such a wonderful way to be transitioned. There was nothing grotesque, even though I was doing things in that film that I was uncomfortable doing. I’d stress out about ‘Oh, I have to make out with that boy on the roof,’ but Sofia would just have me nuzzle into the side of their face. Even though I was blossoming, it was not something I was comfortable with yet. She really opened that door for me.”

Dunst went on to star for Coppola as a coquettish queen in the title role “Marie Antoinette,” and cameoed in “The Bling Ring.”

Assets: Beyond sexual allure, Dunst brings depth and mystery. She can play the girl next door (“Spider-Man”), a drunk bride peeing on the lawn in the moonlight in her wedding dress (“Melancholia”), an imperious 18th-century queen (“Marie Antoinette”), or a racist Nasa administrator (“Hidden Figures”). She has a steely edge, as well as a wicked sense of humor. Her career pivot came before 2010 Ryan Gosling two-hander “All Good Things,” when she started to meet with acting coach/therapist Greta Seacat (who also works with Coppola).

While Dunst always picks projects based on directors, she credits Seacat with a total game change “in terms of acting and how I approach things,” said Dunst. “And now it’s all about me. It’s cathartic for me. It’s my thing, it’s my experience, it’s nothing about pleasing anyone else but myself. And it all comes from me, so I have so much more control than anybody else; it’s all about my own inner life. By the time I get to set, I’m so prepared no one needs to direct me. No one needs to tell me anything. I feel so powerful with what I have to bring, that making movies is for myself now and it’s like getting rid of poisons. Like if you went to a therapist all the time, but I get to do it by acting out anything I want to, so that’s a powerful tool.”

She draws the line at too much nudity, and turned down a sexy role in another Lars von Trier movie. “I would work with him again,” she said. “It just depends on the part because he loves exposing… like Charlotte Gainsbourg, she has a less curvaceous body, so it’s less assaulting to see than if someone with larger breasts and more womanly-shaped did some of the things she did in movies.”

Biggest Problem: As she has come into a strong sense of her own identity, Dunst is making career choices for herself, not her fans. She’s not looking to please anyone else or playing the movie-star game, as evidenced by her maverick choices, from “Melancholia” to “Fargo.” “Only Lars and Pedro Almodovar write these incredible, messy roles for women,” she has said.

Awards Attention: She won Best Actress at Cannes for her hilariously depressed bride in Lars von Trier’s comedic end-of-the-world tragedy, “Melancholia,” after being quick enough on her feet to survive a disastrous Cannes press conference when her director went off the rails. While she earned plaudits and a Golden Globe nomination for Season Two of “Fargo” as the deeply flawed murderess Peggy Blumquist, she’s never earned an Oscar nomination. “The Beguiled” could be her first — she’s earning raves across the board.

Next page: Dunst scribes her character in “The Beguiled”: “Edwina would be me at my worst, working on a film that I don’t want to be on.”

Related storiesHow Controversies Can Hurt Movies Before They're Released -- IndieWire's Movie Podcast (Screen Talk Episode 154)'The Beguiled' Exclusive: Here's What It's Like to Work On A Sofia Coppola Set -- WatchSofia Coppola Explains Why She Left Her Ambitious Take on 'The Little Mermaid' »

- Anne Thompson

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Fargo Season 3 Episode 10 Review – ‘Somebody to Love’

22 June 2017 2:28 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Shaun Munro reviews the season finale of Fargo season 3…

The riveting and occasionally frustrating capper to Fargo‘s divisive third season broached its overarching theme of perception vs. reality (or perhaps more currently, “fake news”) in perfectly ambiguous, Coens-esque fashion, even if in many aspects “Somebody to Love” was a relatively predictable, foregone conclusion to the Stussy story.

Things at least surged right out of the gate with Gloria having her faith restored thanks to Nikki’s correspondence to Agent Dollard, while Nikki and Wrench got tooled up for the fight ahead, and Emmit felt lucky and tried pulling a gun on Varga.

The episode’s first big, seismic moment came during the immensely suspenseful confrontation between Varga and Nikki, which was slow-bled for maximum, delicious atmosphere. Varga finally revealed his truest colours, by leaving his men to die as he escaped in the elevator, and in a weirdly sad moment, even Meemo, whose bloody corpse was later seen being wheeled out. Nikki going full badass perhaps wasn’t that plausible, but the moment was cathartic enough to make it work.

Emmit didn’t have a fun time, did he? The long-standing fan theory was finally confirmed that Mrs. Goldfarb was indeed behind it all, forcing Emmit out of his own company and insisting he file for Chapter 11. Things got even worse when he was eventually confronted by Nikki, who dropped the immortal one-liner, “He’s a kitten now, Ray, case you were wonderin'”. However, her overzealous desire to make a theatrical Moment out of the occasion scuppered her plans, leaving both a cop and herself dead.

It was certainly an unexpected turn and, really, the most Fargo thing ever, to see Emmit as the last man standing. It’s easy to see how some might find that unsatisfying, but three seasons into the show, viewers should be trained to expect this sort of intentionally obtuse, willfully confounding storytelling.

Following poor ‘ol Nikki’s demise, an epilogue sequence takes place five years later, revealing that Sy did in fact survive Varga’s poisoning, though is sadly a mere shadow of his former self. Let’s give Michael Stuhlbarg a hand for his terrific work this season. Narwhal, meanwhile, survives with Goldfarb in control, while Wrench decides to kill Emmit.

It’s a bizarre move on Wrench’s part considering that it’s not easy to believe he’d harbour a grudge for so long and take that amount of time to act on it. Some fans have suggested that Wrench had romantic feelings for Nikki, but it just seems a bit much, to be honest.

And finally, the episode concludes with Gloria now sporting a lovely new haircut and working for the Dhs, who have captured Varga. What follows is a fantastically witty back-and-forth between the two, ending on a cliffhanger which leaves the viewer to conclude whether or not Varga did indeed bend the wills of the universe and escape. It’s a very No Country for Old Men-esque non-committal ending, where optimists will believe that Gloria eventually won, while pessimists will assert that with his wide reach and high-up connections, Varga once again slunk out.

For the most part this was a tidy, satisfying finale that nevertheless ended in a fashion likely to infuriate as many as it pleased. Now one question remains; is this it for Fargo? It’d be fine for the show to end its run with two excellent seasons and one great one, though this world is so damn compelling that fans will no doubt be keeping their fingers crossed for a fourth go-around.

Shaun Munro – Follow me on Twitter for more TV rambling. »

- Shaun Munro

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Fargo’s Carrie Coon Joins Steve McQueen’s Widows

22 June 2017 1:42 PM, PDT | Comingsoon.net | See recent Comingsoon.net news »

The heist thriller debuts in 2018

The post Fargo’s Carrie Coon Joins Steve McQueen’s Widows appeared first on ComingSoon.net. »

- Spencer Perry

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Carrie Coon Joins Steve McQueen's Heist Thriller 'Widows' (Exclusive)

22 June 2017 12:33 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Carrie Coon, currently generating Emmy heat for her superlative work on Fargo and The Leftovers, is headed to the big screen.

The actress has joined the cast of Widows, the New Regency thriller being directed by Steve McQueen. Coon will shoot her part after she wraps work on The Papers, Steven Spielberg’s journalism drama for DreamWorks centering on the Pentagon Papers.

Widows, currently in production, features an ensemble that includes Viola Davis, Elizabeth Debicki and Michelle Rodriguez as well as Liam Neeson, Colin Farrell and Daniel Kaluuya.

The story, based on the 1980s British TV series of the same name, starts »

- Borys Kit

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Kirsten Dunst Says She’s ‘Very Happy’ with Jesse Plemons — but ‘Not in Any Rush’ to Plan Their Wedding

22 June 2017 11:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Kirsten Dunst and Jesse Plemons may have already played husband and wife on television, but in real life the engaged couple are taking it slow when it comes to taking on those roles.

Though The Beguiled actress is “very happy” with her former Fargo costar-turned-fiancé, she tells People she’s “not in any rush” to plan their wedding.

“I’m very relaxed when it comes to those kinds of things,” Dunst says, adding, “I’m going to get married at some point!”

News of the engagement surfaced in January when Dunst, 35, was spotted with what appeared to be an engagement »

- Kara Warner and Brianne Tracy

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Fargo Season 3, Episode 10 Review: Somebody to Love

22 June 2017 10:25 AM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

I gotta be honest, I wasn't looking forward to the Fargo Season 3 finale. There were a lot of balls up in the air and no clear way to tie off all the dangling plot threads. Last season's finale, with the crazy motel shootout and the sudden spaceship appearance, kind of left a bad taste in my mouth -- don't give me space aliens in my neo-noir, crime drama and then fail to explain it. Unfortunately, as events in this finale play out, prepare to be somewhat disappointed... but in a good way, I guess.

Gloria (Carrie Coon) writes a resignation letter in the cold opening, she's cleaned out her desk and headed for the door when the phone rings. IRS guy, Larue Dollard (Hamish Linklater), has built an epic case of fraud, money laundering, and tax evasion -- some of it actually illegal. Nikki (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) sent the care package to Dollard to take down Emmit. He's papered his conference room walls with the documents, it looks like a big deal but it's really not -- we later learn this is all just a false show of bravado, another red herring in a season of red herrings, and it makes the case (again) that we can't trust our eyes.

Related - Fargo Season 3, Episode 9 Review: Aporia

However, with that single phone call everything changes. Gloria's back... in an IRS team-up! What? Not the sexy, dramatic moment you were hoping for? Ok, then how about Nikki and Mr. Wrench (Russell Harvard) sawing-off shotguns and prepping for a heavy assault inside a dimly lit motel room. That's more like it, amirite?

Varga (David Thewlis) has sequestered Emmit (Ewan McGregor) in his house, playing out this minor subplot's endgame. He's surrounded himself with a platoon of patrolling gunmen, fearful of the Swango and Wrench alliance -- rightly so. Emmit is tired, he just wants it all to be over, and though he makes a desperate play to kill Varga, he predictably fizzles. Emmit's story (and by extension, Ray's story too) is the least interesting of the season; things just happen to Emmit and he does little to stop them. It's not that Emmit is an unsympathetic character, rather it's that he's barely present at all, an ultimately inconsequential plot device. Fargo Season 3 has been all about Varga, Nikki, and Gloria.

Nikki lures Varga and his fireteam to an abandoned storage facility. They head for a third floor rendezvous, which is shot like a horror movie. A grim corridor of death awaits as they exit the elevator -- It's a trap (sorry, my inner Star Wars nerd got loose for a moment)!!! Shockingly, we don't witness the bloody ambush -- creator Noah Hawley is showing restraint? Naturally, Varga makes a hasty exit, sacrificing his own men to save himself. Nikki and Wrench subsequently settle their accounts, and Wrench reluctantly walks away with a pile of cash -- he's proven to be the most loyal and honest broker in this warped season, next to Gloria of course.

And then there's Ruby Goldfarb (Mary McDonnell). I kept wondering what an actress of her stature was doing in such a tiny cameo role? It didn't add up. And now we know why: she was the big boss all along; the least among us rises again. Goldfarb takes over Stussy Enterprises and shows Emmit the door in an epic power play!

Feels like we all need a warm hug in a nice Minnesota quilt, eh?

Alas, Nikki's story ends in tragedy and disgrace. She tracks down Emmit on a lonely stretch of Minnesota highway and levels a shotgun on him... until a state trooper rolls up and things go South. I can't say it makes much sense, Nikki is a smart character, a survivor -- it betrays her intelligence to go out in such a stupid fashion. But she's happier now, I guess, reunited with Ray (if you believe in that kind of thing).

But wait, there's more! Another time jump, and it's five years later. Emmit has reconciled with his family; Sy is... alive; Varga's still in the wind; and the big IRS case resulted in a limp misdemeanor and probation (Emmit's illicit earnings allegedly stashed overseas), until Mr. Wrench proves his loyalty one last time and finally settles Nikki's score with Emmit.

On a more positive note, Gloria has moved on, she's a special agent in the Department of Homeland Security. Varga turns up in a Dhs holding cell, and so we finally get our Gloria vs. Varga faceoff (referring to himself now as Daniel Rand, a software salesman out of Brussels -- Hawley is a Marvel fan too, apparently). We've come full-circle, the ending scene is reminiscent of the season's cold opening in East Germany. The dialog here is sharp and there's a fun back-and-forth tension to the scene, but it doesn't tell us very much. Varga tries to convince Gloria that he is about to go free and she contends that he's headed for federal lockup... we wait for the door behind Gloria to open. Will Varga, Rand, the Devil, or whoever he truly is walk away free or in handcuffs? The clocks ticks down and the lights go dark, roll credits. Hunh?

It's a convoluted, kind of unsatisfying ending... but I gotta give Hawley credit, he avoided the formula. I'm glad the season ended on character rather than spectacle. Season 3 really didn't connect with Seasons 1 and 2, and that's Ok. There's no good way to end any complicated story, particularly one this quirky and oddball. What's actually so surprising about this finale is that it's all about the ladies. Noah Hawley is a progressive! It's not the slam bang ending we were expecting, but dammit, it's the ending we deserved! We wish you well in your future endeavors agent Burgle, it's well-earned.

Grade: B

Was this the ending to Fargo Season 3 that you expected? Let us know in the comments down below!

Don't forget to share this post on your Facebook wall and with your Twitter followers! Just hit the buttons on the top of this page. Lrm Lego Origins, Daredevil's Best Fight, Steve McQueen, and More! -- The Lrm Weekend #LRM_Weekend #DavidKozlowski https://t.co/1T4EZ0Yfo4 about 18 minutes ago »

- David Kozlowski

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‘Fargo’ Delivers An Ambiguous, Gender-Improved Season 3 Finale

22 June 2017 9:50 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

**Spoilers about the final episode below.**

Another season of FX’s “Fargo” ended last night, leaving viewers with more questions than answers. Where seasons one and two of the anthology ended with more finality (since season one more or less lays out the future for season two), this third season concluded with the same titillating ambiguity that defines the overall show. “The future is certain,” our villain Varga (David Thewlis) declared ironically in the open-ended finale, as the season — perhaps the show — drew to a close.

Continue reading ‘Fargo’ Delivers An Ambiguous, Gender-Improved Season 3 Finale at The Playlist. »

- Lena Wilson

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‘Fargo’ Season 3 Squandered TV’s Greatest Cast By Trying to Be Every Show At Once

22 June 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

After two seasons worth of magic, “FargoSeason 3 — or Year 3, to use the preferred nomenclature — was finally unable to outrun the specter of Peak TV hovering over its shoulder. Even with one of the greatest TV casts ever assembled, the story of feuding brothers and a nefarious conglomerate slowed the series’ hot streak and brought it back down from the realm of tightly constructed, riveting crime drama into the realm of ordinary.

Wednesday night’s season finale showed why the rest of the previous episodes lacked the distinctive spirit that’s helped make “Fargo” into its own creative entity. The previous two seasons have funneled their experiences through the police officer Solversons at the center: Alison Tolman’s Molly and Patrick Wilson’s Lou both anchored their respective seasons amidst a maelstrom of criminal (and in notable instances, supernatural) activity.

Read More: Noah Hawley on the ‘FargoFinale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You Think

But with a near-unprecedented cast including Ewan McGregor, Carrie Coon, David Thewlis, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Scoot McNairy, Mary McDonnell, Shea Wigham and Michael Stuhlbarg, “Fargo” had that unique but very real problem of juggling an ensemble of actors who were each carrying their own shows within their respective plot lines. Gloria Burgle’s pursuit, the existential quandary of loyalty from Sy, and the classic, biblical blood feud between the two Stussy brothers all seemed like they were vying for supremacy in a show that tried to have it every way.

With all that impressive output in front of the camera, the various adventures that these characters went on seemed too stylistically disparate to be part of a focused season of television. Take Episode 8, “Who Rules the Land of Denial?” as an example. It’s a striking hour of TV, but one that owed its visual and philosophical approach to some of the other biggest TV shows on air right now. Nikki’s kitten-filled encounter in the bowling alley dipped into “Twin Peaks” territory, complete with Ray Wise’s presence. The bloody escape from the prison bus into the woods was practically a dimly lit “Game of Thrones” set-piece, complete with a surprise garroting.

These scenes came in the wake of the overtly Don Hertzfeldt-ian animation sequence from Episode 3 and presaged a “Leftovers”-adjacent piano theme at the end of Episode 9 that would probably make Max Richter do a double take. “Fargo” has always worn its influences on it sleeve, often with an accompanying wink and nod. This season felt like the first time some of the most gorgeous images on TV were in service of a faithful recreation of what’s worked elsewhere, rather than a visionary reinterpretation.

A series that had previously managed to bring together a nuanced look at opposing forces of good and evil managed to play this season fairly straight. By Thewlis’ own admission, V.M. Varga is a character completely without any redeeming qualities. He’s an out-and-out villain from frame one, drab business attire and all. The closest that he comes to any kind of sympathy is his sniveling, tiptoeing towards the elevator after he’s found out he’s under attack in the season finale.

Varga’s two defining characteristics — his rotting teeth and propensity to vomit up his nervous binge eating — were far more literal manifestations of the evil rotting him from inside and out than the show ever burdened its predecessors with. Lorne Malvo and Mike Milligan, previous “Fargo” heavies, were more than just sophisticated bad guys. Their calm demeanor, without much affectation, hinted at the insidious nature of human corruptibility. By placing all its narrative weight on a character who showed so much outward, borderline-cartoonish villainy, Season 3 robbed its central conflict of comparable substance.

And as far as the victim of Varga’s plotting, Emmit Stussy never really moved beyond being a hapless victim, closer to the bumbling cycle of unfortunate circumstances of Jerry Lundegaard from the “Fargo” film than the poisonous, bitter edge that Martin Freeman added to Lester Nygaard. As a result, Ewan McGregor’s double casting never really had the opportunity to move beyond a half-baked treatise on the nature of free will.

One of the reasons “Fargo” succeeded in creating something all its own in preceding installments is that it guided its ambiguities towards a greater purpose. Season 3’s many allegories and literary allusions left little room for interpretation or subversion. Whether listening to Billy Bob Thornton explain the opening of “Peter and the Wolf,” Varga explain Lenin’s appreciation Beethoven, or a series of animated characters float through the Stussy-authored sci-fi universe, each of these came with a blatant, explicit connection to the characters we saw on the screen. In previous seasons, those conclusions would be left to the audience to draw.

The conversation between Gloria and Winnie in Season 3’s penultimate episode also helped to underline this idea. A mystery that our own Ben Travers pointed out fairly early on — Gloria’s invisibility to technology — was made more intriguing by the explanatory distance the show took from it. But in baring her soul to Winnie, there was Gloria expressing all of those concerns out loud in convenient, metaphorical detail. The old “Fargo” would have had her merely stare down the bathroom sink sensor before finally realizing that her circumstances had changed, taking out any references to it in the conversation that came before.

As one final parting confirmation, the show delivered its Season 3 version of a time jump; a transformation that seemed so radical in Season 1 but here seems like a tacked-on afterthought. That audience handholding became even more literal when, without leaving the audience to fill in the blanks, it put the aftermath of the Stussy fortune in direct on-screen text. You could argue that this is a playful, twisted diversion meant to make Emmit’s kitchen assassination all the more shocking. But instead it seemed like a final emphatic exclamation point on the season’s special brand of reinforced cynicism.

Read More: The Coen Brothers’ Rules: 4 Filmmaking Practices That Give ‘Fargo’ Its Cinematic Consistency

All told, this season of “Fargo” was far from without merit. As much as Sy was hamstrung for most of the season, Stuhlbarg still proved that he’s one of the greatest working actors and a worthy addition to the series’ roster of Coen Brothers alumni. The Ray Stussy apartment ambush sequence is one of the best-directed scenes of the year. And the finale’s Mexican standoff was delivered in such a simple and unadorned way that made its consequences all the more tragic.

But even in the artistry of showing the two bodies fall from far away, Nikki’s character farewell underlined how much this version of “Fargo” reveled in making each new development as definitive as possible. A bullet hole to the forehead leaves little room for doubt. “Fargo” is still one of TVs most visceral crime shows, but one thing it didn’t borrow from its fellow 2017 TV shows was to let the mystery be.

Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Related stories'Fargo' Review: Season 3 Finale Ends the Debate and Tells Us If We've Been Wasting Our BreathNoah Hawley on the 'Fargo' Finale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You ThinkHow Editors of 'The Crown,' 'American Gods,' and 'This Is Us' Achieved Emotional Power »

- Steve Greene

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‘Fargo’ Season 3 Squandered TV’s Greatest Cast By Trying to Be Every Show At Once

22 June 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

After two seasons worth of magic, “FargoSeason 3 — or Year 3, to use the preferred nomenclature — was finally unable to outrun the specter of Peak TV hovering over its shoulder. Even with one of the greatest TV casts ever assembled, the story of feuding brothers and a nefarious conglomerate slowed the series’ hot streak and brought it back down from the realm of tightly constructed, riveting crime drama into the realm of ordinary.

Wednesday night’s season finale showed why the rest of the previous episodes lacked the distinctive spirit that’s helped make “Fargo” into its own creative entity. The previous two seasons have funneled their experiences through the police officer Solversons at the center: Alison Tolman’s Molly and Patrick Wilson’s Lou both anchored their respective seasons amidst a maelstrom of criminal (and in notable instances, supernatural) activity.

Read More: Noah Hawley on the ‘FargoFinale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You Think

But with a near-unprecedented cast including Ewan McGregor, Carrie Coon, David Thewlis, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Scoot McNairy, Mary McDonnell, Shea Wigham and Michael Stuhlbarg, “Fargo” had that unique but very real problem of juggling an ensemble of actors who were each carrying their own shows within their respective plot lines. Gloria Burgle’s pursuit, the existential quandary of loyalty from Sy, and the classic, biblical blood feud between the two Stussy brothers all seemed like they were vying for supremacy in a show that tried to have it every way.

With all that impressive output in front of the camera, the various adventures that these characters went on seemed too stylistically disparate to be part of a focused season of television. Take Episode 8, “Who Rules the Land of Denial?” as an example. It’s a striking hour of TV, but one that owed its visual and philosophical approach to some of the other biggest TV shows on air right now. Nikki’s kitten-filled encounter in the bowling alley dipped into “Twin Peaks” territory, complete with Ray Wise’s presence. The bloody escape from the prison bus into the woods was practically a dimly lit “Game of Thrones” set-piece, complete with a surprise garroting.

These scenes came in the wake of the overtly Don Hertzfeldt-ian animation sequence from Episode 3 and presaged a “Leftovers”-adjacent piano theme at the end of Episode 9 that would probably make Max Richter do a double take. “Fargo” has always worn its influences on it sleeve, often with an accompanying wink and nod. This season felt like the first time some of the most gorgeous images on TV were in service of a faithful recreation of what’s worked elsewhere, rather than a visionary reinterpretation.

A series that had previously managed to bring together a nuanced look at opposing forces of good and evil managed to play this season fairly straight. By Thewlis’ own admission, V.M. Varga is a character completely without any redeeming qualities. He’s an out-and-out villain from frame one, drab business attire and all. The closest that he comes to any kind of sympathy is his sniveling, tiptoeing towards the elevator after he’s found out he’s under attack in the season finale.

Varga’s two defining characteristics — his rotting teeth and propensity to vomit up his nervous binge eating — were far more literal manifestations of the evil rotting him from inside and out than the show ever burdened its predecessors with. Lorne Malvo and Mike Milligan, previous “Fargo” heavies, were more than just sophisticated bad guys. Their calm demeanor, without much affectation, hinted at the insidious nature of human corruptibility. By placing all its narrative weight on a character who showed so much outward, borderline-cartoonish villainy, Season 3 robbed its central conflict of comparable substance.

And as far as the victim of Varga’s plotting, Emmit Stussy never really moved beyond being a hapless victim, closer to the bumbling cycle of unfortunate circumstances of Jerry Lundegaard from the “Fargo” film than the poisonous, bitter edge that Martin Freeman added to Lester Nygaard. As a result, Ewan McGregor’s double casting never really had the opportunity to move beyond a half-baked treatise on the nature of free will.

One of the reasons “Fargo” succeeded in creating something all its own in preceding installments is that it guided its ambiguities towards a greater purpose. Season 3’s many allegories and literary allusions left little room for interpretation or subversion. Whether listening to Billy Bob Thornton explain the opening of “Peter and the Wolf,” Varga explain Lenin’s appreciation Beethoven, or a series of animated characters float through the Stussy-authored sci-fi universe, each of these came with a blatant, explicit connection to the characters we saw on the screen. In previous seasons, those conclusions would be left to the audience to draw.

The conversation between Gloria and Winnie in Season 3’s penultimate episode also helped to underline this idea. A mystery that our own Ben Travers pointed out fairly early on — Gloria’s invisibility to technology — was made more intriguing by the explanatory distance the show took from it. But in baring her soul to Winnie, there was Gloria expressing all of those concerns out loud in convenient, metaphorical detail. The old “Fargo” would have had her merely stare down the bathroom sink sensor before finally realizing that her circumstances had changed, taking out any references to it in the conversation that came before.

As one final parting confirmation, the show delivered its Season 3 version of a time jump; a transformation that seemed so radical in Season 1 but here seems like a tacked-on afterthought. That audience handholding became even more literal when, without leaving the audience to fill in the blanks, it put the aftermath of the Stussy fortune in direct on-screen text. You could argue that this is a playful, twisted diversion meant to make Emmit’s kitchen assassination all the more shocking. But instead it seemed like a final emphatic exclamation point on the season’s special brand of reinforced cynicism.

Read More: The Coen Brothers’ Rules: 4 Filmmaking Practices That Give ‘Fargo’ Its Cinematic Consistency

All told, this season of “Fargo” was far from without merit. As much as Sy was hamstrung for most of the season, Stuhlbarg still proved that he’s one of the greatest working actors and a worthy addition to the series’ roster of Coen Brothers alumni. The Ray Stussy apartment ambush sequence is one of the best-directed scenes of the year. And the finale’s Mexican standoff was delivered in such a simple and unadorned way that made its consequences all the more tragic.

But even in the artistry of showing the two bodies fall from far away, Nikki’s character farewell underlined how much this version of “Fargo” reveled in making each new development as definitive as possible. A bullet hole to the forehead leaves little room for doubt. “Fargo” is still one of TVs most visceral crime shows, but one thing it didn’t borrow from its fellow 2017 TV shows was to let the mystery be.

Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Related stories'Fargo' Review: Season 3 Finale Ends the Debate and Tells Us If We've Been Wasting Our BreathNoah Hawley on the 'Fargo' Finale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You ThinkHow Editors of 'The Crown,' 'American Gods,' and 'This Is Us' Achieved Emotional Power »

- Steve Greene

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Fargo Season 4 is Potentially Years Away

22 June 2017 5:31 AM, PDT | ScreenRant.com | See recent Screen Rant news »

Fargo season 3 has come to a close, and showrunner Noah Hawley says there's likely to be a very long wait before season 4 arrives. »

- Becky Fuller

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‘Fargo’ Finale: Noah Hawley Talks Season 3

21 June 2017 8:30 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Spoiler Alert: Do not read if you have not watched “Somebody to Love,” the June 21 episode of “Fargo.”

The third season of FX’s “Fargo” ended Wednesday night in bloody, morally murky fashion as is its wont. Creator and executive producer Noah Hawley spoke with Variety about season three, the big ideas at the center of the story, and what the future of the series looks like.

What was different about this season from previous seasons?

I think there was something to writing these last few hours that felt like a dialogue with our current moment. And I tried to »

- Daniel Holloway

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‘Fargo’ Ep Noah Hawley On Open-Ended Finale, Potential Season 4 & ‘Cat’s Cradle’

21 June 2017 8:15 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Spoiler Alert: This story contains details of tonight's Fargo Season 3 finale. “Please don’t tell people this is the end,” says Fargo series creator Noah Hawley about the recent news that there may never be another season of the FX show. “Right now, I just can’t point to (a production start) date on the calendar.” Hawley is a busy guy. He’s currently breaking story on the second season of FX/Marvel’s Legion, which goes into production in September and lasts through the… »

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