6.8/10
3,605
35 user 34 critic

Bombay Talkies (2013)

Trailer
2:10 | Trailer
One hundred years of Hindi cinema is celebrated in four short stories showcasing the power of film.

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
Reviews
2 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Crime | Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

A British woman faces challenges while attempting to locate her father in India.

Director: Anurag Kashyap
Stars: Kalki Koechlin, Prashant Prakash, Naseeruddin Shah
Bombay Velvet (2015)
Crime | Drama | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.7/10 X  

An ordinary man goes against all odds and forges his destiny to become a 'Big Shot'.

Director: Anurag Kashyap
Stars: Ranbir Kapoor, Anushka Sharma, Karan Johar
No Smoking (2007)
Drama | Fantasy | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

A man fights against a tyrannical institution for his right to smoke, hence, for individual freedom.

Director: Anurag Kashyap
Stars: John Abraham, Ayesha Takia, Paresh Rawal
Paanch (2003)
Crime | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

Four friends (Luke, Murgi, Joy and Pondy) wasted by youth and self destruction play together in a band along with a fifth female member (Shiuli). Luke the lead singer and self-imposed ... See full summary »

Director: Anurag Kashyap
Stars: Kay Kay Menon, Aditya Srivastava, Joy Fernandes
Comedy | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

A video camcorder, a store security camera, and concealed cameras candidly expose lives in three loosely-linked tales.

Director: Dibakar Banerjee
Stars: Nushrat Bharucha, Anshuman Jha, Neha Chauhan
Ugly (2013)
Crime | Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

The case of a missing girl takes us through a journey of human greed and brushes upon the egos and repressed emotions of the characters.

Director: Anurag Kashyap
Stars: Rahul Bhat, Ronit Roy, Tejaswini Kolhapure
Short | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

That day after every day deals with eve teasing , an extremely relevant and sensitive social cause that has been disturbing all of us for quite some time now. The film revolves around three... See full summary »

Director: Anurag Kashyap
Stars: Radhika Apte, Mahesh Balraj, Geetanjali
Kali-Katha (2014)
Short | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

A struggling actor and his desperate wife get twisted by society and conceive Kali.

Director: Anurag Kashyap
Stars: Rahul Bhat, Tejaswini Kolhapure, Vineet Kumar Singh
Gulaal (2009)
Crime | Drama | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

A law student witnesses deception, homicide, and crime after being elected as General Secretary of his college.

Director: Anurag Kashyap
Stars: Kay Kay Menon, Raj Singh Chaudhary, Jesse Randhawa
Dev.D (2009)
Comedy | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

After breaking up with his childhood sweetheart, a young man finds solace in drugs. Meanwhile, a teenage girl is caught in the world of prostitution. Will they be destroyed, or will they find redemption?

Director: Anurag Kashyap
Stars: Abhay Deol, Mahie Gill, Kalki Koechlin
Shorts (2013)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

A compilation of five short films.

Directors: Neeraj Ghaywan, Siddharth Gupt, and 3 more credits »
Stars: Satyakam Anand, Aparajit Bhattacharjee, Richa Chadha
Shanghai (2012)
Crime | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

Prime leader of a campaign against a big government project is killed in what appears to be a road accident. An IAS officer is ordered to probe the incident and the veils of falsehood begin to drop.

Director: Dibakar Banerjee
Stars: Emraan Hashmi, Abhay Deol, Prasenjit Chatterjee
Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
...
Gayatri
...
Dev
...
Avinash
...
Purandar
...
Herself
...
Vicky's Father
...
Himself
...
Herself
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
...
Himself
...
Herself
...
Herself
...
Herself
...
Vicky
...
Himself
Edit

Storyline

One hundred years of Hindi cinema is celebrated in four short stories showcasing the power of film.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

3 May 2013 (India)  »

Also Known As:

Говорит и показывает Бомбей  »

Box Office

Budget:

INR 60,000,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

This is the second time the stars Aamir Khan and Shah Rukh Khan share screen space (towards the song at the end of the movie) after Pehla Nasha (1993)in which they cameoed together for a scene. See more »

Goofs

In the Murabba story, when Vineet Kumar(Vijay) is talking to the Omelette guy, his lips move for a full sentence but only half of the sentence is audible in the vocal playback. See more »

Connections

Features Don (2006) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Banerjee's Work is So Rich and Alive It Blows The Other Works Out of Water. Kashyap Holds His Own But Akhtar Struggles and Johar's Work Seems Flaccid In Comparison.
6 May 2013 | by (India) – See all my reviews

Director Dibakar Banerjee is keener in establishing the little world his characters, both major and minor, inhabit. You are far more enthusiastic and involved with these people because Banerjee knits together the entire fabric of his creation rather than simply weaving the design; he allows his camera to capture the sight, the sound and the essence of his world and you are respond and reciprocate it to it more than you would to works by other directors. He is one of the best new Indian directors I have seen whose films have gotten far less credit than they deserve. Everyone talks about Karan Johar's or Anurag Kashyap's involvement and only a few (which includes me) may've gone for Bombay Talkies to watch out for Dibakar Banerjee. His segment is called Star and it comes right after Johar's opening segment; Banerjee's work simply blows the other segments out of water, and only Kashyap's Murabba is able to escape uninjured. But poor Zoya Akhtar's segment Sheila Ki Jawaani isn't very lucky, barely holding up to the standards of Banerjee's work. And Johar's hokey gay-themed segment seems flaccid in comparison.

I don't mean by saying all this that you should skip the other segments and only catch Banerjee's; Bombay Talkies is a far better offering than most other Indian movies you might catch in theaters. It's got a limited release and has managed to rake in mediocre box-office collections, but it surely deserves to be recognized for being novel not just for the sake of being novel. Four different directors with quite different styles and palettes put up their works for an anthology film and you as an audience member have a lot more to discuss here than just the quality of the film itself: you compare these filmmakers' works and form your own preferences. I loved Banerjee's work but I hear many other praising Karan Johar more, but you see what's happening here is that everyone's talking a lot more about the film than they usually would. For this alone people should catch Bombay Talkies before it exits theaters with its final salute to Bollywood.

Bombay Talkies, named after a prestigious movie studio of the same name which opened in the 30s and has closed down now, is a cinematic ode to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of Bollywood. This ode is sung by four directors: 1) Karan Johar, known for his epic-length melodramas with names usually beginning with letter 'K', 2) Dibakar Banerjee, a superbly talented director whose works evoke the multiplicities seen in Neorealist films 3) Zoya Akhtar, who has won a couple of awards in India and comes from a family of talented actors, musicians and lyricists and 4) Anurag Kashyap, whose works have been screened at Cannes. While Johar and Akhtar share this style of directing that many of the filmmakers who've been brought up in this industry from the start possess, Kashyap and Banerjee inject the flavor of world cinema into commercial Bollywood.

Johar begins first, his film being about Avinash, a lonely gay man estranged from his family who meets a lonely married straight woman whose sex life (with her husband, of course. Infidelity not usually tackled in Indian films) is sterile. There's the husband who is dull and lonely (and completely not aroused by his wife) and loves old Hindi songs, and things get complicated when Avinash meets the husband and his gay sensor tingles. You perfectly know what's going to happen next. Once Johar's done, its Banerjee's turn: his film is about a lower-middle class Maharashtrian (Nawazuddin Siddique, awards coming your way) whose many little ambitions, which includes breeding Emus, have never taken flight until the moment he gets the golden opportunity to share the screen space with megastar Ranbir Kapoor one day. If Banerjee makes us hate the theater owners for keeping an interval for the film, Zoya Akhtar's segment post-intermission about a little kid who hates football and likes dressing up like a girl and who idolizes actress Katrina Kaif makes us hate the film's editor for not including more of Dibakar's story. The final segment is a little queer and quirky, and it's by Kashyap; his film is about Vijay, an Allahabad native who, under his ailing father's insistence, travels to Bombay to offer the King of Bollywood half of a Murabba, a jam pickle, so that the other half, once blessed with Bachchan's uhm…teeth could be consumed by Vijay's father to get well.

Johar's segment is simple are quite predictable; you are well aware what's going to happen and because it's a Johar film, you know there'll be a lot of tears shed by the characters. Apart from its hokey and hackneyed theme, I really wasn't sure whether it portrayed gays in a flattering light. Akhtar on the other hand makes a film full of annoyingly precocious children and one-dimensional characters, especially the kid's father who keeps repeating 'Football is a guy's game. Football will make you strong'. Anurag Kashyap's 'Murabba' is delicious and delightful, but not anywhere close to the richness of Banerjee's offering. There's so much to enjoy, so many little things that we watch happening in Banerjee's film, and he's a pro when it comes to handling his camera and sound. There's a common theme of father-son relationship running in all four shorts.

There's a music video after the shorts which celebrates the hundred years of Bollywood, and they've added a montage that shows Bollywood through the period. Towards the end, stars like Aamir Khan turn up but I was sadly disappointed by the presence of some actors like Sonam Kapoor here, which shows just how retarded Bollywood has become. Why couldn't they let Nawazuddin sing? Or Kalki Koechlin? When your entire film is about celebrating the true stars, why ruin the moment by bringing in the hundred crore club whose films are strapped on stars and short on sense?


6 of 10 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?

Top Rated and Trending Indian Movies

Check out the Indian movies with the highest ratings from IMDb users, as well as the movies that are trending in real time.