6.6/10
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39 user 132 critic

Rosewater (2014)

Trailer
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Iranian-Canadian journalist Maziar Bahari is detained by Iranian forces who brutally interrogate him under suspicion that he is a spy.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (book) | 1 more credit »
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Davood
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Baba Akbar
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Moloojoon
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Paola
Amir El-Masry ...
Alireza
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Haj Agha
Kambiz Hosseini ...
Hassan
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Rahim
Ayman Sharaiha ...
Blue-Eyed Seyyed
Zeid Kattan ...
Seyyed
Ali Elayan ...
Channel One State TV Interviewer
Nidal Ali ...
Prison Soundsman
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Storyline

Based of a true story about a journalist who gets detained and brutally interrogated in prison for 118 days. The journalist Maziar Bahari was blindfolded and interrogated for 4 months in Evin prison in Iran, while the only distinguishable feature about his captor is the distinct smell of rosewater. An interview and sketch that Maziar did with a journalist on The Daily Show was used as evidence that Maziar was a spy and in communication with the American government and the CIA. Written by abivians

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Biography | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language including some crude references, and violent content | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

27 November 2014 (Israel)  »

Also Known As:

118 Dias  »

Filming Locations:


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Box Office

Budget:

$5,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$567,038, 21 November 2014, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$3,128,941, 30 January 2015
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jon Stewart's directing debut. See more »

Goofs

Maziar Bahari was in prison for over three months but neither his hair or facial hair changes in length. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Maziar Bahari: [narrating] When I was nine my sister took me to the Shrine of Masumeh. It was beautiful. I will never forget the smell. A mix of sweat and rosewater they showered down on the faithful. I used to think only the most pious carried that scent.
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Connections

References Teorema (1968) See more »

Soundtracks

Vagheyi
Performed by Ouf
Written by Mahdyar Aghajani
Courtesy of Mahdyar Aghajani
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User Reviews

 
Decent debut from Jon Stewart
11 February 2016 | by See all my reviews

Decent debut from Jon Stewart.

The true story of Maziar Bahari, an Iran-Canadian Newsweek journalist who went back to Iran in 2009 to cover the national elections. Once the despot Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the incumbent, wins the Presidency, protests breaks out. After filming and reporting on the election and protests, Bahari is arrested, imprisoned and tortured.

The first film, as director, for Jon Stewart, of The Daily Show fame. He also wrote the screenplay, adapted from Bahari's book "Then they came for me". A good place for Stewart to start as he knows Bahari well and had interviewed him many times on The Daily Show. Plus, Bahari's light-hearted interview with Jason Jones on The Daily Show is used against him during his arrest.

An interesting story, though doesn't really cover any new ground regarding freedom and how despots treat their people. Not a very compelling story, for this reason. Stewart pretty much covers the story in linear, blow-by-blow fashion, with the only departure from this being that the first scene is Bahari's arrest, and then we go back in time to see what lead to it.

Solid work from Gael Garcia Bernal in the lead role. Supporting cast are fine too.

A good enough start from Jon Stewart. He had a story he wanted to tell, and he told it. With experience and confidence he'll get better at telling stories in movie form.


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