Endeavour (2012– )
8.3/10
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4 user 1 critic

Rocket 

An unpopular fitter is murdered during a royal visit at a family owned munitions factory.

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
James Merry ...
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Estella Broom
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Lenny Frost
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Crown Prince Nabil
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Richard Broom
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Joanna Cassidy ...
Brenda Grice
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Storyline

On the day an Arab trade delegation visits the Broom family's arms factory owner Henry Broom announces a proposed French merger,which his abrasive,estranged wife Nora opposes. Soon afterwards the corpse of unpopular workman Percy Malleson is discovered,the suggestion being that the Brooms used him to spy on the work-force after the suspension of employee Lenny Frost. Then Morse learns that Percy was actually Eustace Kendrick and he was investigating the disappearance of his girl-friend Olive Rix,who had been romantically involved with Harry,the now deceased elder son of the Brooms. However,following a second murder another suspect and motive come to Morse's attention. Written by don @ minifie-1

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Genres:

Crime | Drama | Mystery

Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

21 July 2013 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The clue in the final credits is Standfast, the name of the missile system. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Time Clerk: Morning.
Percy Malleson: Percy Malleson.
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Connections

References Inspector Morse: Dead on Time (1992) See more »

Soundtracks

Inspector Morse Theme (Full Version)
(uncredited)
Written by Barrington Pheloung
Performed by Barrington Pheloung
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User Reviews

 
Morse at the munitions plant
3 July 2017 | by See all my reviews

Having recently been, and just finished being, on a roll reviewing all the episodes of 'Lewis', which generally was very enjoyable before having some disappointments later on, it occurred to me to do the same for 'Inspector Morse's' (one of my favourites for over a decade, and all the episodes were also reviewed in my first year on IMDb eight years ago) prequel series 'Endeavour'.

As said in my review for the entire show two years ago, 'Endeavour' is not just a more than worthy prequel series to one of my favourite detective dramas of all time and goes very well with it, but it is a great series on its own as well. It maintains everything that makes 'Inspector Morse' so good, while also containing enough to make it its own, and in my mind 'Inspector Morse', 'Lewis' and 'Endeavour' go perfectly well together.

Was very impressed by the pilot episode, even with a very understandable slight finding-its-feet feel (that is true of a lot of shows, exceptions like 'Morse' itself, 'A Touch of Frost' and 'Midsomer Murders', which started off great and were remarkably well established, are fairly few. The first episode of the first season "Girl" was a very welcome return, a fine episode in its own right and was even better. Morse's personality is more established with more obvious recognisable personality quirks and generally things feel more settled.

It must have been very difficult following on, and living up to, from one of the show's best episodes "Fugue", but "Rocket" manages to do brilliantly and is just as good.

"Rocket's" production values can't be faulted. It is exquisitely photographed and there is something very nostalgic and charming about the atmospherically evoked 1960s period detail. It was also a genius move to keep Barrington Pheloung on board, with his hauntingly beautiful scoring and immortal 'Inspector Morse' theme, and while the use of music isn't as ingenious as it was in "Fugue" it's hugely effective still.

Writing, even for so early on, is every bit as intelligent, entertaining and tense as the previous episodes and as the best of 'Morse'. The story has tension, ), a good deal going on and little feels improbable or too obvious while being suitably complicated. Morse and Thursday's father/son relationship, while even stronger later being more entertaining and heartfelt, has a lot of warmth, is so well written within the story and is a large part of the series' appeal and there is some good suspense. How great to see a younger Max and Strange well before he became superintendent.

The pacing is restrained, but that allows the atmosphere to come through, and pretty much all the same it excels in that aspect. The characters are interesting.

Shaun Evans again does some powerful, charismatic work as younger Morse, showing enough loyalty to John Thaw's iconic Morse while making the character his own too. Roger Allam is also superb, his rapport with Evans always compels and entertains but Thursday is quite a sympathetic character, as well as loyal and firm, and Allam does a lot special with a role that could have been less interesting possibly in lesser hands. All the acting is very good from Sean Rigby, Anton Lesser and Martin Jarvis standing out of the guest supporting cast.

Overall, another brilliant episode. 10/10 Bethany Cox


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