Endeavour (2012– )
8.5/10
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Morse investigates a seemingly apparent hit-and-run accident that has claimed the life of an Oxford don.

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Paul Venables ...
Prof Alistair Coke Norris
...
...
Judy Vallens
Guy Williams ...
Jolyon Frobisher
...
Charlie Ayres
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Dr. Ian Kern
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PC Jim Strange
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Millicent Coke Norris
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...
Joan Thursday
...
Chief Superintendent Bright
...
Dr. Max DeBryn
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...
Dorothea Frazil
Chris Barnes ...
Albert Gudgeon
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Storyline

Professor Coke Norris is killed in a hit and run. At the same time Thursday is perturbed to learn that the new owner of the Moonlight Room night club is Vic Kasper,a London gangster with whom he has history. Morse finds proof that Coke Norris visited the club as well as discovering that he was opposed to the sale of college land to build a housing estate. The murder of a cigarette girl from the club used in a blackmail plot to expedite the sale leads Thursday to Kasper as Morse discovers the reason for his superior's hatred of the man and they combine to act when Thursday's daughter is endangered. Morse then works out the real reason for the professor's murder before sitting his sergeant's exams. Written by don @ minifie-1

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Genres:

Crime | Drama | Mystery

Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

28 July 2013 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

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(DVD)

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Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The clue in the final credit is Proms, referring to the concert series, a clue to the murderer. See more »

Goofs

DI Thursday insinuates that DC Morse's firing range results were very good but the footage of the qualifying at the shooting range shows Morse firing in two shot bursts and the gun barrel during each second shot is obviously pointed way too high to hit the target because of the recoil from the first shot. See more »

Quotes

[in the pub, Jakes carries three glasses of beer to the table: two pints of bitter for Morse and Thursday and a pint of lighter beer for himself]
DI Fred Thursday: [to Jakes] What's that, then? *Lager* beer, is it?
[Jakes echoes the advertising slogan]
DS Peter Jakes: Double Diamond. Works wonders.
DC Endeavour Morse: [dryly] The wonder is anyone buys the stuff.
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Soundtracks

In Paradisum
and "Sanctus" from "Requiem in D minor, op. 48"
Written by Gabriel Fauré
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User Reviews

 
Superior!
11 August 2015 | by See all my reviews

"Endeavor," through every episode of the first season, presents a smart, sensitive, thoughtful, beautifully filmed and well-written series. It is a huge improvement on "Lewis," and in some ways is better than the original "Morse." This episode is equal to the previous ones. Great performances, good editing, good pace.

"Lewis" has been held back by the limitations of the character the wonderful Whately plays, the too-one-note Fox, and shabby writing. It has been pretentious. "Morse" had the matchless Thaw, and with Whately and other good supporting actors it managed to seem intelligent, if in a heavy- handed way.

Noir forgives unbelievability. In fact, it requires it. A realistic, don't-call-it-cozy, near- contemporary treatments of crime in academia yielding to American influences demands believability - and a firm brake on formula. "Academia is Byzantium" and "Scholarship is Corruption" are heavy-handedly repetitive themes.

But "Endeavor" does not stretch for significance and achieves it in the process. Shaun Evans manages to create his own character and presents him as a troubled young man with a reserved but expressive demeanor. He remains inscrutable enough to convey depth but maintains a fuller humanity than Thaw could as a finished (in more ways than one) character.

The plots pull back from the Sturm und Drang of both "Morse" and "Lewis," showing a more realistic world. And the setting of the show in the 1960s permits a design that lends detachment and style. (Sometimes the 1960s effects are over-played - not EVERY young woman wore an impeccable bob and sported perfect mod colors and tailoring mid-decade. Call it the "Mad Men" influence, via Thames Valley. But that's not really a complaint since the look is gorgeous.)

The message of "Morse" was that life is cruel and people are miserable but art can help if you drink enough booze (and good colleagues make life bearable).

The message of "Lewis" is that life is cruel and intelligence comes at a price, but love can make it worth the harm (and good colleagues make life bearable).

The message of "Endeavor," however, at least through the first set, is that life is life. One has a chance for both peace and damage, and it's better to take both with open eyes (and good colleagues make life bearable - Roger Allam's Thursday is a marvel).

Evans just has to avoid appearing like Dr. Who on an undercover mission in the near-swinging Earth of 1966.

Well, maybe he doesn't have to avoid it, at that.


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