8.0/10
46
1 user 4 critic

Broadway Musicals: A Jewish Legacy (2013)

Engaging, humorous, and provocative, Broadway Musicals: A Jewish Legacy examines the unique role of Jewish composers and lyricists in the creation of the modern American musical. The film ... See full summary »

Director:

Writer:

Reviews

Watch Now

From $9.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Mary Ellen Barrett ...
Herself (as Mary Ellin Barrett)
Jamie Bernstein ...
Herself
Jerry Bock ...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Himself
...
Himself
...
Herself
...
Sportin' Life (archive footage)
...
Narrator
Ernest Harburg ...
Himself
Sheldon Harnick ...
Himself
Stuart J. Hecht ...
Himself - Theatre Historian
Jerry Herman ...
Himself
...
Himself
...
Himself
John Kander ...
Himself
Edit

Storyline

Engaging, humorous, and provocative, Broadway Musicals: A Jewish Legacy examines the unique role of Jewish composers and lyricists in the creation of the modern American musical. The film showcases the work of legends such as Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, George and Ira Gershwin, Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II, Leonard Bernstein, and Stephen Sondheim. Interviews with songwriters and luminaries including Sheldon Harnick, Stephen Schwartz, Harold Prince, Arthur Laurents, Charles Strouse, and Mel Brooks provide insight, alongside standout performances and archival footage. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

1 January 2013 (USA)  »

Box Office

Budget:

$1,500,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Featured in Imagine: Broadway Musicals: A Jewish Legacy (2013) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Broadway Musicals: You Do Have to Be Jewish ****
3 December 2013 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Excellent documentary detailing the role of the Jewish composer in Broadway musicals.

It was the hope of the composers to be able to assimilate, accommodate and bring music into the lives of audiences. While we can see Jewish liturgy being used in composition, shows were made to highlight the traditions of all people, not only depicting the Jewish experience. In fact, many of the composers went out of their way to write pieces dealing with non-Jewish characters. That is why 1964's "Fiddler on the Roof" was such a break through in the history of the musical theater.

Mel Brooks' idea of destroying Hitler through comedy is certainly unique, but as far as I'm concerned is still quite controversial to say the least.

Cole Porter claimed that he would be successful in the field by writing Jewish.

Ethel Merman disgraced herself by bringing a ham sandwich to a Seder on Passover. Merman lived in fear of being associated with Jewish identity.


1 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?