5.8/10
6,717
46 user 71 critic

Boulevard (2014)

R | | Drama | 10 July 2015 (USA)
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A devoted husband in a marriage of convenience is forced to confront his secret life.

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1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Joy
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Leo
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Eddie
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Patty
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Winston
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Beaumont
Gary Gardner ...
Lionel Mack (Father)
Crystal Gray ...
Nurse
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ER Doctor
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Gloria Beaumont
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Blyden
Steven Randazzo ...
Guard Walt
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Cat
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Night Nurse
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Storyline

Nolan Mack is sixty. Married to Joy, a charming and intelligent woman, friend to Winston, a bright literature professor, and well-regarded in the bank where he works, Noland leads a quiet uneventful life. But is he happy, as his superior at the bank once asks him...? One night, as he drives back home, he nearly runs into a gay hooker. Sorry for what might have happened, Nolan starts a conversation with the young man named Leo and ends up in a hotel room. Not for paid sex as Leo expects though. In fact, the polished old man has fallen in love with the raw prostitute. For, having been gay since the age of twelve, Nolan has never been able to express his sexual orientation and Leo happens to crystallize all his feelings and desires. But is a hooker the ideal object of a romantic love? And to what extent will it affect his married life and professional career? Written by Guy Bellinger

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

It's never too late to make a U-turn

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and sexual content. | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

10 July 2015 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Η λεωφόρος των ονείρων  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$27,000 (USA) (17 July 2015)

Gross:

$121,150 (USA) (22 June 2016)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The script was originally titled, "Santa Monica Boulevard". See more »

Goofs

When Nolan and Leo are eating dinner at the restaurant Nolan lifts his glass of wine by the bowl to take a sip. Next, we see Nolan from behind holding the glass by the stem while taking the same sip. See more »

Quotes

Nolan Mack: It is just time for us to be in the real world.
Joy: What if I don't wanna be in the real world?
Nolan Mack: Well, I do.
Joy: Well, I don't.
Joy: That's why I married you.
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Connections

Referenced in Half in the Bag: The 2016 Oscars (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Goodbye Joy
Written by Charlie Girl
Performed by Jimmy Haun
Courtesy Ditostuff
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User Reviews

 
His Dramatic Swan Song
9 July 2015 | by (Dallas, Texas) – See all my reviews

Greetings again from the darkness. The tragic death of Robin Williams last year left a void in the world of comedy, and his absence is also felt on the big screen where his dramatic skills were often under-appreciated. His final non-comedic role comes courtesy of a film that is probably not worthy of his talents, but leaves us with a reminder of what a skilled actor he was.

The premise feels at once a bit dated and also timely. Williams plays Nolan, a 60 year old man who works at his comfortable bank job (of 26 years), goes home each day to his comfortable suburban home, to a comfortable marriage to his wife (Kathy Baker) with whom he no longer shares a bed or much of anything else. He also periodically stops off to put a straw in the ginger ale for his near comatose father with whom he has never had much of a relationship. His entire life is a façade of comfort and life lived well enough.

"Are you happy?" That seemingly odd and innocent question from his boss sets Nolan off on a path of awakening. It turns out that since he was 12 years old, Nolan has suppressed his true identity as a gay man. A spontaneous u-turn on the titular Boulevard sends Nolan on a collision path with Leo (Roberto Aguire), a young male prostitute with whom he quickly bonds … through only talking and self-identification.

It's this awakening that brings a level of modern-timeliness as Nolan's story is not so different from that of Bruce/Caitlyn Jenner who has dominated the recent media with the late-in-life shift in persona. They are sixty-plus year old men who have evidently each lived a lie for much of their lives. It's difficult for many of us to relate to, but clearly it's a real thing, and director Dito Montiel and writer Douglas Soesbe capitalize.

The best and most uncomfortable scenes occur with Ms. Baker and Mr. Williams avoiding the issue through years of practice, and also the scenes with Mr. Williams and Bob Odenkirk who plays his long-time friend and confidant. These are three strong actors who work well with each other.

There is really nothing wrong with the film … it's slow pace designed to match that of Nolan's life … but the Nolan and Leo segment just never clicked, leaving me struggling with a third of the story. It's about a man who is totally not comfortable in his own skin, and lives a somber and unfulfilled life right up until the point where he takes a leap. It's not that he takes a leap, but rather the specific leap he takes that just didn't click for me. Still, it's a performance from Williams that is worth watching – in fact, must be watched if you are a Robin Williams fan.


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