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The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years (2016)

Unrated | | Documentary, Music | 16 September 2016 (USA)
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A compilation of found footage featuring music, interviews, and stories of The Beatles' 250 concerts from 1963 to 1966.

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, (story consultant)
Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 1 win & 9 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Himself
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Himself
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Himself (archive footage)
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Himself (archive footage)
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Themselves (archive footage)
Larry Kane ...
Himself
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Herself
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Himself
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Himself
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Herself
Neil Aspinall ...
Himself (archive footage)
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Himself
Kitty Oliver ...
Herself
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Himself
Jon Savage ...
Himself
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Storyline

In the 1960s, the Beatles exploded on to the public scene, seemingly out of nowhere as the band's formative years of constant performing at home and in Hamburg, and Brian Epstein's grooming, finally paid off beyond their wildest dreams. Accompanying new interviews of the remaining Beatles, their associates and fans as well as archival interviews of the late ones, this film features footage of the heady concert years of 1963 to 66 when the band became a worldwide cultural phenomena topping them all. Furthermore, it also follows how the Fab Four began to change and grow while the excitement of Beatlemania began to sour their lives into an intolerable slog they needed to escape from to become more than what their fans wanted. Written by Kenneth Chisholm (kchishol@rogers.com)

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The band you know. The story you don't.

Genres:

Documentary | Music

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

16 September 2016 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Eight Days a Week  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$615,632 (USA) (16 September 2016)

Gross:

$2,930,414 (USA) (6 January 2017)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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| (archive footage)
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The genesis of this film arose from Ron Howard's association with Nigel Sinclair who'd been an executive producer on Ron's earlier Rush (2013). Sinclair, who produced his share of rockumentaries (George Harrison: Living in the Material World (2011), etc), had been impressed with Ron's Made in America (2013) music documentary and simply invited him into process. See more »

Goofs

In the theatre special concert from Shea Stadium, George very visibly switches to his 12-string Rickenbacker guitar for "A Hard Day's Night", but during the song, there are a few shots of him suddenly playing his Gretsch instead. See more »

Quotes

Ringo Starr: Y'know, like, I can talk like I'm from Liverpool,
[points to the camera]
Ringo Starr: fuck you, I'm tellin' you, don't give me any hard time.
See more »

Connections

Features Hullabaloo (1965) See more »

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User Reviews

 
An old tale retold
17 September 2016 | by (Australia) – See all my reviews

If, like me, you've been an obsessed Beatle fan all of your life, watching Ron Howard's Eight Days A Week may be a slightly strange experience.

For the casual fan it should, for the most part, be a fun 2 1/4 hours packed with lots of interesting footage and interviews. But for myself, who has virtually every bit of video footage and audio tape that fans can get their hands on, there isn't much that's new and you may be left wondering why Howard would take the brave step of releasing nostalgic stuff like this on the big screen. "Ah, let's see, we can watch Jason Bourne or Suicide Squad...I know, let's watch old footage of the Beatles!" But I cannot deny that the audience that shared my viewing was reasonably large in numbers, and they seemed to appreciate the experience, so I guess its a case of "well done, Ron Howard".

If I had to complain about a few things, it would be the cropped footage converting 4:3 to 16:9, or having BW turned to colour in a lot of cases. I prefer historical things to not be messed with. Having said that, I was pleasantly surprised to see that the full concert they show at the end of the film was uncropped, and the picture quality was excellent!

So was it worth this very experienced Beatle fan's while to see Eight Days A Week in the cinema and not just wait for the Blu-ray? Yes, it was worthwhile, and I think my lasting memories will be the rest of the audience snickering every time the footage jumped to another hysterical fan screaming out for one of the four. It made the viewing more fun.


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