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Yip Man: Jung gik yat jin
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Ip Man: The Final Fight (2013) More at IMDbPro »Yip Man: Jung gik yat jin (original title)

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Ip Man: The Final Fight -- In postwar Hong Kong, legendary Wing Chun grandmaster Ip Man is reluctantly called into action once more.  What began as simple challenges from rival kung fu schools soon finds him drawn into the dark and dangerous underworld of the Triads.  Now, to defend life and honor, Ip Man has no choice but to fight - one last time.
Ip Man: The Final Fight --  In postwar Hong Kong, legendary Wing Chun grandmaster Ip Man is reluctantly called into action once more, when what begin as simple challenges from rival kung fu styles soon draw him into the dark and dangerous underworld of the Triads. Now, to defend li

Overview

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Director:
Writer:
Erica Lee (screenplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for Ip Man: The Final Fight on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
22 March 2013 (China) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
In postwar Hong Kong, legendary Wing Chun grandmaster Ip Man is reluctantly called into action once more... See more » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
2 wins & 1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
Alternately heartwarming, poignant and thrilling, this portrait of Ip Man's later to twilight years boasts an exceptionally nuanced performance by Anthony Wong See more (15 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Anthony Chau-Sang Wong ... Yip Man
Gillian Chung ... Chan Sei-mui
Jordan Chan ... Tang Shing

Eric Tsang ... Ng Chung
Marvel Chow ... Wang Dong
Zhou Chuchu ... Jenny
Timmy Hung ... Leung Sheung
Luxia Jiang ... Li Qiong
Xin Xin Xiong ... Local Dragon
Ip Chun ... Stall owner with phone
Anita Yuen ... Cheung Wing-Sing

Kai Chi Liu ... Lee Yiu-wah
Cho-lam Wong ... Blind Chan
Jonathan Wong ... Ni Tang
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Leo Au-Yeung ... Fat Choi
Aki Chan ... Worker
Rose Chan
Cho Kwai Chee ... Queen Mary Hospital Doctor
Kevin Cheng ... young Ip Man
Queenie Chu ... So Fei
Zhou Dingyu ... Wong Tung
Hark-On Fung ... Chess Onlooker

Ash Gordey ... Superintendent of Police
Junlica ... Worker
Lam Chi Kit ... Dentist
Yiu Kin Kong ... Disciple of Pak Hok Pai
Koon-Lan Law ... Lee Yiu-wah's wife
Ken Lo ... Wei Batian
Joe Luk ... Luk Fu
Au Tsui Yea Maggie ... Queen Mary Hospital Nurse
Hoi Mang ... Chess Onlooker
Mulhall ... Disciple
Donny Ng ... Ng Chan
Wang Qinxi ... Daughter of Lee Yiu-wah
Sebastian ... Disciple
Kasey Tang ... Worker
Chalie Wong ... Worker
Donny Wu ... Wu Zan
Jia Hui Wu ... Loan-shark
Ding Xiaolong ... Monkey
Liang Xinwen ... Daughter of Lee Yiu-wah
Huangli Xu ... Lee Yiu-wah's daughter
Lu Yangyang ... Daughter of Lee Yiu-wah
Chen Yanxi ... Son of Lee Yiu-wah
Junjie Zhang ... Disciple of Ip Man
Songwen Zhang ... Yip Chun
Lv Ziying ... Son of Chan Sei Mai

Directed by
Herman Yau 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Erica Lee  screenplay

Produced by
Chi-Wai Fung .... line producer
Catherine Hun .... co-producer
Cherry Law .... co-producer
Nga-Bok Lee .... executive producer (as Albert Lee)
Nga-Bok Lee .... producer (as Albert Lee)
Kwok Lam Sin .... executive producer
Kwok Lam Sin .... producer
Bak-Ming Wong .... producer
Albert Yeung .... producer
 
Original Music by
Chun Hung Mak 
 
Cinematography by
Kwong-Hung Chan (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Wai Chiu Chung 
 
Production Design by
Raymond Chan 
 
Costume Design by
Thomas Chong 
 
Sound Department
Gerald Leung .... a.d.r. recordist
 
Stunts
Leo Au-Yeung .... wing chun consultant
Marvel Chow .... wing chun consultant
Chung Chi Li .... action choreographer
Kwok Lam Sin .... action choreographer
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Kin Man Ng .... gaffer
 
Other crew
Ip Chun .... advisor and consultant
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Yip Man: Jung gik yat jin" - Hong Kong (original title)
See more »
MPAA:
Rated PG-13 for martial arts violence and some drug material
Runtime:
100 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:

Did You Know?

Goofs:
Anachronisms: When Ip Man arrives in Hong Kong in 1949, he is nearly struck by a Volkswagen Type 2 (aka Camper or Minibus). The first Type 2's were not produced until mid-November 1949 and the vehicle was not available for sale until 1950.See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
DreamSee more »

FAQ

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26 out of 35 people found the following review useful.
Alternately heartwarming, poignant and thrilling, this portrait of Ip Man's later to twilight years boasts an exceptionally nuanced performance by Anthony Wong, 24 March 2013
Author: moviexclusive from Singapore

Is it too soon for yet another story based on the life of the legendary Wing Chun grandmaster? Well, seeing as how utterly disappointing Wong Kar Wai's version was, the answer is an empathetic yes. Here to revive hope that there is still much we have yet to see about Ip Man's life is Herman Yau's 'Ip Man: The Final Fight', a sequel of sorts to his much flashier predecessor 'Ip Man: The Legend is Born' that focuses on the character's middle to later years.

Like Donnie Yen's 'Ip Man 2', this one begins in 1949 as Ip Man (Anthony Wong) arrives in Hong Kong from Foshan to settle into a humble room on the roof of a three-storey shophouse. Thanks to a chance encounter with martial arts enthusiast Leung Sheung (Timmy Hung, better known as son of Sammo Hung), Ip gains a small following of working-class individuals to start a makeshift Wing Chun school without needing to go against his nature to advertise his craft.

It might seem like a motley crew – including a policeman (Jordan Chan), a seamstress and union activist (Jiang Luxia), a waitress at a dim-sum restaurant (Gillian Chung), a prison officer (Marvel Chow) and a tram driver – but there's no denying their passion to learn, and at least at the start, how close-knit a group they make. Yet the circumstances then don't make it any easier for Ip nor for his students, and it is from casting the fates of Ip and his disciples against a constantly evolving but always tumultuous Hong Kong in the 1950s to 1970s that Yau's film truly comes alive.

Similarities to Alex Law's 'Echoes of the Rainbow' are not unjustified, since Yau clearly evokes the same sense of nostalgia for the period during which the former was also set. Expertly weaving several disparate themes, screenwriter Erica Li deftly paints a vivid picture of a colony rocked by tensions between the unions and their companies, infighting between the various martial arts schools, corruption of the local police and most importantly, the struggle of ordinary folk to make ends meet and provide for their family.

Li draws on these real-life historical contexts to delineate the fates of Ip and his disciples, in particular that of Tang Sing (Chan) and Wong Tung (Chow). Among the disciples, Tang Sing's character is the most fully-fleshed, depicted as a good man caught in a moral crisis between following his conscience (as Ip advises) and the temptations of power and money in his position of authority. Tang's choice to side with the infamous kingpin named Dragon (Xiong Xin Xin) behind many of the illegal activities taking place inside the notorious Kowloon Walled City inevitably entwines Wong Tung, and by extension the entire Ip Man clan that culminates in the titular showdown.

That finale is but one of four thrilling action setpieces, and easily the most gripping and exhilarating one. First within the confines of an illegal boxing ring in a warehouse and then along the exterior windswept alley battered by the onslaught of an imminent typhoon, action choreographers Li Chung Chi and Checkley Sin let the climactic fight between Ip Man and Dragon play out – the joy here not solely being from seeing veteran martial arts actor Xiong Xin Xin show off his impressive moves, but also from how Anthony Wong's one-year training in Wing Chun has truly paid off. Of course, that is also apparent from the earlier sequences, in particular one in which Ip Man squares off in a friendly closed-door bout with rival 'White Crane' master Ng Chun (comedian Eric Tsang in a fantastic cameo that shows off his agility quite certainly honed from his former days as a stuntman).

Besides demonstrating a facet of Anthony Wong's acting repertoire that is rarely seen (fun fact – the man is a dedicated practitioner of the 'Monkey Fist' style), this portrayal of Ip Man also benefits from the dramatic skills of arguably one of the best actors in Hong Kong cinema today. While Tony Leung's was just like any other of his from other Wong Kar Wai collaborations and Donnie Yen's was probably more stagey than who Ip Man was in real life, Wong's depiction is – we dare say – the most nuanced that captures both the man's humble dispositions and his internal struggles.

The latter is also thanks to a multi-layered script that doesn't just dwell on the aspects of Ip Man's life that pertain to his martial artistry, but also his personal life in relation to his wife Yong Cheng (Anita Yuen) and his son (Mainland actor Zhang Song Wen). The first Ip Man film so far to pay due attention to what must have been one of his greatest regrets spending the large part of his postwar years apart from wife and son, it just as poignantly reveals his gentle affection for a Shanghainese songstress Jenny (Zhou Chuchu) - despite the veiled objections of his students - that again finds closure in death. Wong is absolutely brilliant in these intimate moments of Ip Man's life, and it's hard to imagine a more befitting actor here to play the role.

In choosing to illuminate the less ostentatious but more relatable characteristics of Ip Man's twilight years, Yau's film truly stands apart from the other four films that have come before it. Less concerned about the legend than the Man behind it, 'Ip Man: The Final Fight' is the most heartfelt one yet about him, with an assured and sensitive directorial hand from Yau guiding a well-written script and a terrific lead performance by Anthony Wong as well as fine supporting acts from Jordan Chan, Eric Tsang and Chuchu. Even though it doesn't have Donnie Yen's star power or the marquee names of Wong Kar Wai and Tony Leung, this is a beautiful film that offers a well-balanced perspective of Ip Man's later years against the rich backdrop of post-World War II Hong Kong

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