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How Martin Scorsese Will Save Filmmaking From Extinction — Exclusive Interview

How Martin Scorsese Will Save Filmmaking From Extinction — Exclusive Interview
It means something when one of American cinema’s greatest auteurs and commits to working on a digital platform, big-screen experience be damned. That’s exactly what Martin Scorsese did by partnering with Netflix on his next project, the $125 million mob movie “The Irishman.” While the 74-year-old New Yorker delights in celebrating film history, he’s practical enough to know his movies must remain relevant in rapidly changing times.

The fast-talking cinephile has also moved into television (“Boardwalk Empire” and “Vinyl”), fought to preserve film history through archival efforts, and produced films from younger generations. By getting a handle on multiple facets of the moving image, he’s saving filmmaking from extinction in a fragmented media age, even as he contributes to the art form with his own vibrant and ambitious directing efforts.

“I do think, with the advent of digital, there’s good hope that the storytelling impulse will always be there,
See full article at Indiewire »

Tribeca Review: ‘Abundant Acreage Available’ is a Quietly Moving Character Study

Faith-based cinema is as diverse a genre as there is, from the extreme, often violent portraits of devotion from established directors like Martin Scorsese and Mel Gibson, to the attacks on logic in the God’s Not Dead and Left Behind pictures. Angus MacLachlan, a great storyteller of the not-too-deep south, offers a nuanced example of what this genre can bring, returning with the moving Abundant Acreage Available. The title may signal a light-hearted film, and given MacLachlan’s previous feature (the charming sex comedy Goodbye To All That) and writing credits (which include Phil Morrison’s masterpiece Junebug), you might be forgiven for having that expectation. However, MacLachlan’s latest is a departure from his previous work: a quiet, powerful portrait of two families at a crossroads, featuring the middle-aged Ledbetters — including the reformed alcoholic Jesse (Terry Kinney) and his adopted sister Tracy (Amy Ryan) — and three aging brothers (Max Gail,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Tribeca Film Review: ‘Abundant Acreage Available’

Tribeca Film Review: ‘Abundant Acreage Available’
If you liked “Manchester by the Sea” — or the kind of low-key emotional drama in which men break down and sob uncontrollably — then Martin Scorsese has the movie for you. It’s called “Abundant Acreage Available,” and it’s pretty much the opposite of anything Scorsese has directed, which stands to reason, because he didn’t direct it. North Carolina playwright-turned-director Angus MacLachlan did, and like the “Junebug” script for which he’s best known, this one achieves a tricky kind of subtlety amid so much stage-style chatter. (Just to be clear about Scorsese’s involvement, he agreed to executive produce after seeing MacLachlan’s promising debut feature, “Goodbye to All That,” which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival two years earlier.)

Set on a family-owned North Carolina tobacco farm, recognizable as such from its almost blood-red clay, “Abundant Acreage Available” begins as many a play has, with a pair
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Amy Ryan Doesn’t Care What You Think In This Exclusive Clip From ‘Abundant Acreage Available’

Filmmaker Angus MacLachlan has a good history with the Tribeca Film Festival. Back in 2014, MacLachlan’s debut film — the divorce dramedy “Goodbye to All That” — was a hit with the Tribeca jury members and crowds alike, garnering a Best Narrative Feature nomination as well as a Best Actor win for star Paul Schneider. Now, three years later, MacLachlan is back at the festival with “Abundant Acreage Available,” his film about a pair of rural siblings dealing with the loss of their father.

Continue reading Amy Ryan Doesn’t Care What You Think In This Exclusive Clip From ‘Abundant Acreage Available’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Amy Ryan Gives Her Best Performance In a Decade With ‘Abundant Acreage Available’ — Tribeca 2017 Review

Amy Ryan Gives Her Best Performance In a Decade With ‘Abundant Acreage Available’ — Tribeca 2017 Review
If “Abundant Acreage Available” didn’t have closeups or outdoor scenes, it could have been filmed theater. Writer-director Angus MacLachlan’s second feature focuses on grown siblings Tracy (Amy Ryan) and Jesse (Terry Kinney) in the immediate aftermath of their father’s death. Stuck with his expansive farmland, they’re unsure what to do next, until the arrival of three older men who knew the deceased stake a claim to it. Set in a single location with a cast of five, the movie offers a lesson in minimalist drama, unfolding as a sharply acted mood piece that never crescendos, but hums along with wise observations and first-rate performances.

A intergenerational family drama that wouldn’t look out of place in the oeuvres of Tennessee Miller or Arthur Miller, “Abundant Acreage Available” is a noticeably more somber work for MacLachlan, whose directorial debut “Goodbye to All That” was a vulgar black comedy about overcoming divorce.
See full article at Indiewire »

Tribeca 2017: 14 Must-See Films From This Year’s Festival

Tribeca 2017: 14 Must-See Films From This Year’s Festival
Now in its sixteenth year, New York City’s own Tribeca Film Festival kicks off every spring with a wide variety of programming on offer, from an ever-expanding Vr installation to an enviable television lineup, but the bread and butter of the annual festival is still in its film slate. This year’s festival offers up plenty of returning favorites with new projects, alongside fresh faces itching to break out. From insightful documentaries to fanciful features, with a heavy dose of Gotham-centric films (hey, it is Tribeca after all), there’s plenty to dive into here, so we’ve culled the schedule for a few surefire hits.

This year’s Tribeca Film Festival takes place April 20 – 30. Check out some of our must-see picks below.

Read More: Why ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Is the Most Anticipated Screening of the Tribeca Film Festival

“A Gray State”

It might be the craziest story
See full article at Indiewire »

Tribeca 2015 Critic’s Notebook: When I Live My Life Over Again, Dirty Weekend, Applesauce and Bad Hurt

It’s awards day at Tribeca and judging by the informal polling taking place at parties with free booze and in line at the Shake Shack next to the Regal Battery Park, the cinerati thinks this was a lukewarm edition. The fest’s first weekend provided more than its fair share of dreary viewing, with no films like last year’s still-unreleased Noah Buschel stunner Glass Chin or Angus MacLachlan’s unfairly overlooked Goodbye to All That to salve my hunger for top-shelf small movies that ought to matter. The festival surely has some strong surprises I haven’t uncovered, but time is running out; around mid-fest, everyone’s […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Tribeca 2015 Critic’s Notebook: When I Live My Life Over Again, Dirty Weekend, Applesauce and Bad Hurt

It’s awards day at Tribeca and judging by the informal polling taking place at parties with free booze and in line at the Shake Shack next to the Regal Battery Park, the cinerati thinks this was a lukewarm edition. The fest’s first weekend provided more than its fair share of dreary viewing, with no films like last year’s still-unreleased Noah Buschel stunner Glass Chin or Angus MacLachlan’s unfairly overlooked Goodbye to All That to salve my hunger for top-shelf small movies that ought to matter. The festival surely has some strong surprises I haven’t uncovered, but time is running out; around mid-fest, everyone’s […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Melanie Lynskey on Togetherness, realism and 'radical' nudity

From Heavenly Creatures to HBO’s Togetherness, the New Zealand actor reflects on what 20 years – and Charlie Sheen – have taught her about showbusiness

There are few more disturbing scenes than the violent conclusion to Heavenly Creatures. Peter Jackson’s film introduced not only future Oscar-winner Kate Winslet to the world in 1994, but also the talents and charm of Melanie Lynskey. The New Zealander has since become a stalwart supporting actor in the likes of Up In the Air, Shattered Glass and The Informant.

Her gig as Rose in the incomprehensibly popular sitcom Two and a Half Men now wrapped, she is currently impressing in Togetherness, HBO’s new show from the Duplass brothers which aired its first season finale on Sunday. With roles in indie flicks Happy Christmas, We’ll Never Have Paris and Goodbye To All That reaching Antipodean screens in 2015, Lynskey spoke to Guardian Australia about her penchant for realism,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Spotlight lines up Chloe & Theo for Efm

  • ScreenDaily
Spotlight lines up Chloe & Theo for Efm
Exclusive: La-based Spotlight Pictures heads to Berlin with two new titles on its sales roster.

"Chloe & Theo" Trailer from Spotlight Pictures on Vimeo.

Chloe & Theo stars Dakota Johnson, who heads to Berlin for the February 11 international premiere of the highly anticipated erotic adaptation and Berlinale Special Gala Fifty Shades Of Grey.

Miro Sorvino and Theo Ikummaq also star in Chloe & Theo, which boasts Richard Branson as executive producer and centres on a homeless girl in New York who befriends an Inuit from the Arctic on a mission to convince the leaders of the industrialised world to act on climate change. Ezna Sands directed.

Goodbye To All That from director Angus MacLachlan stars Paul Schneider, Heather Graham, Melanie Lynskey, Anna Camp and Ashley Hinshaw.

Mindy Goldberg and Anne Carey produced the comedy about a hapless man who re-enters the dating pool after his wife suddenly asks for a divorce.

Schneider was named best actor when the film premiered
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘Mr. Turner’ Paints A Solid Box-Office Bow; ‘Inherent Vice,’ ‘Imitation Game’ Take Top PTAs

  • Deadline
Sony Classics’ Mr. Turner had a near masterpiece of a theatrical debut in limited release, creating director Mike Leigh‘s highest per-theater average for any of his titles opening on multiple screens. But holdovers Inherent Vice from Warner Bros and TWC’s The Imitation Game took the highest and second-highest averages this weekend, while Whiplash, Citizenfour and Force Majeure all passed notable milestones in their on-screen runs.

Mr. Turner, starring Timothy Spall, grossed $108,638 for a $21,728 average in five theaters.

“This is the perfect alternative to the big Hollywood blockbuster,” said Spc co-president Michael Barker. “This movie is really going to cross over. The reason we wanted to become involved with this film years ago is that Turner is the first modern painter. He bridged the gap between the classical and the modern, and his fans range in all ages. Young people are also very interested in seeing this film.”

The
See full article at Deadline »

Indie Romantic Comedies Are a Dime a Dozen, But Goodbye to All That Is Charming, Beautiful, and Sad

  • Vulture
Indie Romantic Comedies Are a Dime a Dozen, But Goodbye to All That Is Charming, Beautiful, and Sad
Romantic comedies involving people moving on after divorce are a dime a dozen, but rarely are they as generous, sharply observed, and humane as Angus MacLachlan’s Goodbye to All That, a teeny, tiny indie opening amid this week’s big-studio behemoths. It’s the modest tale of Otto (a fantastic Paul Schneider), a likable, klutzy, self-absorbed North Carolina husband and father whose wife (an equally fantastic Melanie Lynskey) announces one day that she wants a divorce. Or rather her psychiatrist announces it for her. Otto, it seems, is so clueless to the needs of those around him that he didn’t even know his wife was seeing a shrink. The divorce is presented as a fait accompli; nobody around Otto, including his distracted lawyer, suggests he fight it or that he do much of anything, except move on.And so he does. He gets on Facebook and connects with high-school sweethearts.
See full article at Vulture »

Five reasons to seek out the sexy indie comedy 'Goodbye to All That'

Five reasons to seek out the sexy indie comedy 'Goodbye to All That'
Goodbye to All That is about a nice guy who misses out on everything that’s funny, sexy, sweet, sad and exciting about life because he’s just not paying attention. Moviegoers could lose out on the same if they don’t seek out this new indie comedy. The film, written and directed by Junebug screenwriter Angus MacLachlan, stars Paul Schneider as a clumsy but kind-hearted dad named Otto Wall, who is blindsided one day by wife Melanie Lynskey’s request for a divorce. As his life falls apart, he discovers he wasn’t making much use of it anyway and embarks on a romantic,
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

“Scary and Sad and Difficult and Funny and Erotic and Exciting”: Angus MacLachlan on Goodbye to All That

Goodbye to All That‘s protagonist Otto Wall is a limited man — the type of man who just goes along with the flow, who doesn’t try to ruffle feathers. He’s not stupid, but neither is he gifted with remarkable intelligence. He has a good job, an attractive if possibly overbearing wife (Melanie Lynskey) and an adorable, auburn-haired daughter who is quickly turning into a North Carolina Methodist. He’s lucky, at least until he isn’t. Played with gentle moxie by Paul Schneider, in his most memorable motion picture role since Dick Liddil in The Assassination of Jesse James By the Coward Robert […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

“Scary and Sad and Difficult and Funny and Erotic and Exciting”: Angus MacLachlan on Goodbye to All That

Goodbye to All That‘s protagonist Otto Wall is a limited man — the type of man who just goes along with the flow, who doesn’t try to ruffle feathers. He’s not stupid, but neither is he gifted with remarkable intelligence. He has a good job, an attractive if possibly overbearing wife (Melanie Lynskey) and an adorable, auburn-haired daughter who is quickly turning into a North Carolina Methodist. He’s lucky, at least until he isn’t. Played with gentle moxie by Paul Schneider, in his most memorable motion picture role since Dick Liddil in The Assassination of Jesse James By the Coward Robert […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Weekend Movies & TV: 'The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies,' 'The Honorable Woman,' & More (Video)

This weekend, Bilbo and company fight Smaug and an array of combatants to save Middle-Earth in "The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies," the political BBC mini-series "The Honorable Woman" starring Maggie Gyllenhaal comes to Netflix, and the annual special "A Home for the Holidays" airs this Friday at 9 p.m. on CBS with performances from Earth Wind & Fire, Train, Jennifer Hudson, and more.

Also in theaters this weekend: The musical "Annie" gets a modern-day twist with Quvenzhané Wallis as Annie, Jamie Foxx as the business tycoon, and Cameron Diaz as foster mother, Hannigan. Rose Byrne and Bobby Cannavale round out the All-Star cast. In "Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb," favorite and new characters are united as Larry (Ben Stiller) spans the globe to save the magic before it is gone forever. Owen Wilson, Rebel Wilson, the late Robin Williams, and many more star in supporting roles.
See full article at Moviefone »

Family Drama Goodbye to All That Strikes One Note

Family Drama Goodbye to All That Strikes One Note
From the first moments of Goodbye to All That, when Otto Wall (Paul Schneider) is jogging past vibrant autumn foliage to the strains of a Haydn piano concerto, Angus MacLachlan's directorial debut feels like a 1980s Alan Alda dramedy (The Four Seasons, A New Life). Otto is a comfortably oblivious white-collar suburban dad who's unaware that tween daughter Edie (Audrey Scott) worries about his safety — or that his wife, Annie (Melanie Lynskey), is filing divorce papers. "Why do these things always happen to Daddy?" Edie asks after an Atv accident hobbles the marathon runner. "He doesn't pay attention," answers the weary Annie, and that's as insightful as MacLachlan's script gets. Otto's inattention is manifested in clumsiness and bad luck. Oth...
See full article at Village Voice »

Exclusive: Heather Graham & Paul Schneider Reconnect In Clip From 'Goodbye To All That'

There are plenty of movies about the complications of breakups and the difficulty of moving on. But few tackle those themes from the perspective of older, middle aged folks who have plenty of history and baggage behind them. And that's the charm of  Angus MacLachlan's "Goodbye To All That," and today we have an exclusive look at the film. Starring Paul Schneider (who won a Best Actor award at the Tribeca Film Festival for his performance), Heather Graham, Melanie Lynskey, Amy Sedaris and Ashley Hinshaw, the story follows Otto, who winds up on the receiving end of an unexpected divorce and has to deal with the responsibilities of single parenthood and navigating the dating scene. In this clip, he meets up with an old flame, and the two reconnect via their shared histories and new lives. "Goodbye To All That" opens on December 17th in New York City and hits VOD the same day.
See full article at The Playlist »

Watch the Trailer for Under-the-Radar Indie Charmer ‘Goodbye to All That’

Watch the Trailer for Under-the-Radar Indie Charmer ‘Goodbye to All That’
One indie film that’s mostly flown under the radar is Goodbye to All That, which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival this past spring. But judging by the first trailer, it may be time to give this one a closer look. Goodbye to All That is the directorial debut of Angus MacLachlan, screenwriter of the […]

The post Watch the Trailer for Under-the-Radar Indie Charmer ‘Goodbye to All That’ appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Paul Schneider Stars in Ensemble 'Goodbye to All That' First Trailer

As far as underrated actors go, Paul Schneider certainly ranks up there. With understated roles in films like Away We Go, Lars and the Real Girl, Elizabethtown and a two season role on "Parks & Recreation," he's proven to be a likeable everyman. Now he's back with a new indie ensemble drama called Goodbye to All That, a drama that marks the directorial debut of Junebug screenwriter Angus MacLachlan. The film follows a domesticated father and husband whose life is thrown into upheaval when his wife wants a divorce. Cue the struggle of being single again and trying to date. But this looks genuine and honest. Watch! Here's the first trailer for Angus MacLachlan's Goodbye to All That, originally from Yahoo: Goodbye to All That is written and directed by Angus MacLachlan (writer of Junebug) Otto Wall (Paul Schneider of All the Real Girls, Away We Go) is your typical suburban husband and father,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »
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