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2014 | 2013 | 2012

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Wftv honours Redgrave, Baines, Pike, Hogg

6 December 2014 5:45 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Joanna Hogg dedicated her award to the late Chris Collins.

The 24th annual Women in Film and TV Awards, held at the Park Lane Hilton in London yesterday, honoured Vanessa Redgrave with its Lifetime Achievement Award, sponsored by Eon Productions. She is pictured with David Hare, who presented her trophy. “Thank you beyond words,” Redgrave said. “Good luck to everybody who is trying to do good work in film and TV wherever they may be.”

Rosamund Pike was honoured with the Mac Best Performance Award for her role in Gone Girl. The heavily pregnant actress accepted with a charming video message that praised novelist Gillian Flynn and director David Fincher for taking a risk by casting her as Amy. She joked that she could give birth while the lunch was going on, and quipped that “it takes less time to make a human being than it does to make a film.”

Exhibition director »

- wendy.mitchell@screendaily.com (Wendy Mitchell)

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News Bits: Nyfcc, Prayer, Monsters, Top 10s

1 December 2014 12:17 PM, PST | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

New York Film Critics Circle

Richard Linklater's "Boyhood" swept the New York Film Critics Circle awards announced this morning. The feature scored best film, director, and supporting actress for Patricia Arquette's role. Also nabbing acting honors were Marion Cotillard for "Two Days, One Night," Timothy Spall for "Mr. Turner" and J.K. Simmons for "Whiplash".

"The Grand Budapest Hotel" scored best screenplay, "The Babadook" won best first film, "The Immigrant" nabbed best cinematography, "Ida" won best foreign language film, "The Lego Movie" scored best animated feature, and "Citizenfour" won best documentary. [Source: Nyfcc]

Hunter's Prayer

Allen Leech ("Downton Abbey," "In Fear," "The Imitation Game") will join Sam Worthington and Odeya Rush in Jonathan Mostow's "Hunter’s Prayer" based on Kevin Wignall's novel "For the Dogs".

Worthington plays a hired assassin sent to target a woman whom he instead bonds with and together they go on the run. Leech will play the assassin's former employer. »

- Garth Franklin

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Edgar Wright and John Waters Reveal Their Top 10 of 2014 Lists; Show Love to Boyhood and Maps To The Stars

1 December 2014 10:00 AM, PST | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

The critics groups and guilds will soon be announcing their year-end picks and nominations for 2014, and individual filmmakers are chiming in as well.  Edgar Wright and John Waters are the first out the gate, and their lists are both interesting.  Wright went with a nice mix of blockbusters and indies with Boyhood, Interstellar, The Lego Movie, and Whiplash in his Top 10 while Waters went a bit more obscure with L'il Quinquin, Who Took Johnny, and Violette, although his favorite film of the year was David Cronenberg's Maps to the Stars, and also put Lars Von Trier's Nymphomaniac: Vol. 1 and 2 on the list. Hit the jump for the filmmakers' lists. Edgar Wright (click over to Esquire for his explanation on his unordered choices) Boyhood The Grand Budapest Hotel Birdman Snowpiercer Interstellar Nightcrawler Under The Skin The Lego Movie Whiplash Edge Of Tomorrow John Waters (Artforum [via The Playlist] has his comments on »

- Matt Goldberg

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Screen Awards 2014 winners

23 October 2014 5:01 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Updated (gallery/official winners book): The Screen Awards has unveiled its 2014 winners, recognising excellence in UK marketing, distribution and exhibition.Scroll down for full list of winnersBrowse the Screen Awards book Heregallery: Click here for pictures from the night

The awards were handed out at a glamorous ceremony at The Brewery in London last night, before 500 assembled guests. Broadcaster Edith Bowman hosted the event for the third year.

Twentieth Century Fox took home the hotly contested studio distributor of the year award, while Curzon Artificial Eye won the best independent distributor prize.

Prison drama Starred Up, from Twentieth Century Fox, took home theatrical campaign of the year, with a highly commended notice for Alain Guiraudie’s Stranger By The Lake.

Twentieth Century Fox scored a further four wins including 3D campaign for How To Train Your Dragon 2 and prizes for best marketing team, online campaign for Dawn of the Planet of the Apes with Think Jam »

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Screen Awards 2014 winners revealed

23 October 2014 5:01 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Updated (gallery/official winners book): The Screen Awards has unveiled its 2014 winners, recognising excellence in UK marketing, distribution and exhibition.Scroll down for full list of winnersBrowse the Screen Awards book Heregallery: Click here for pictures from the night

The awards were handed out at a glamorous ceremony at The Brewery in London last night, before 500 assembled guests. Broadcaster Edith Bowman hosted the event for the third year.

Twentieth Century Fox took home the hotly contested studio distributor of the year award, while Curzon Artificial Eye won the best independent distributor prize.

Prison drama Starred Up, from Twentieth Century Fox, took home theatrical campaign of the year, with a highly commended notice for Alain Guiraudie’s Stranger By The Lake.

Twentieth Century Fox scored a further four wins including 3D campaign for How To Train Your Dragon 2 and prizes for best marketing team, online campaign for Dawn of the Planet of the Apes with Think Jam »

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Portrait of an Exhibition, part 2 by Anne-Katrin Titze

29 July 2014 8:03 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Liam Gillick in New York on Exhibition: "The problem is essentially a crisis in representation. These people in the film thought they were beyond difference." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

A married couple live in a fantastic house in London designed by late architect James Melvin. Their relationship to each other and to the building, their work as artists and how it relates to their bodies are exposed by Joanna Hogg in Exhibition.

Liam Gillick and I continue our conversation with an examination of a crisis in representation, the influence of Julia Kristeva and Luce Irigaray, and how Valie Export and early Marina Abramovic informed Viv Albertine's portrait of the artist D. Ed Rutherford's cinematography, Liam's future in acting and the meaning of bare feet are also explored.

Anne-Katrin Titze: Where did you first see the finished film?

Liam Gillick as H on his belly in the grass with »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Interview with Liam Gillick about Exhibition

28 July 2014 7:38 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Joanna Hogg's H in Exhibition, Liam Gillick, with Anne-Katrin Titze at Dolce & Gabbana: "Before the film happened, I've been thinking a lot about the problem of cinema. That's when the phone rang."

I met up for coffee with the man who plays H in Joanna Hogg's Exhibition, to talk about his work as a first time actor, Cary Grant improvising for Leo McCarey with Irene Dunne in The Awful Truth, Alain Delon with Maurice Ronet interpreting Patricia Highsmith's The Talented Mr. Ripley in Purple Noon, and his newfound appreciation for the Grudge Match antics between Robert De Niro and Sylvester Stallone. Liam Gillick talked parallel lives, what cinema means to contemporary artists, and how it felt to become material. Robert Bresson and Hermann Hesse were assigned as homework by Hogg to prepare him for his role opposite Viv Albertine's D in Exhibition.

Liam had just arrived »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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The Noteworthy: Cinema Scope 59, Best Films of the 90s, Il Cinema Ritrovato

14 July 2014 5:37 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Edited by Adam Cook

First up: the summer issue of Cinema Scope has arrived, and aside from Mark Persanson's annual biting take on Cannes (this year's is particularly inspired), there are several pieces available online to read. For the rest (including my review of Abel Ferrara's Welcome to New York!), you'll have to pick up the print issue. The latest edition of La Furia Umana is also now available online. Check out Toni D'Angela's editor's note, "The 'Film' of the Visible". From Interview Magazine, Harmony Korine talks to Kenneth Anger!! Interesting takes on Michael Bay's Transformers: Age of Extinction are few and far between (hopefully our forthcoming piece on the film will suffice...), but Richard Brody has two measured, insightful articles: one on the film itself, and one on its cultural impact. In Film Comment, Graham Fuller chats with British filmmaker Joanna Hogg:

"Fc: Why did you choose, »

- Notebook

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Look for this ‘Exhibition’ in the art house

29 June 2014 10:15 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Exhibition

Written & Directed by Joanna Hogg

UK, 2013

 

Exhibition is a collection of moments that add up to something if the viewer is prepared to do the math.  Plots, character arcs and narrative considerations are nowhere to be found in this art house offering from writer-director, Joanna Hogg.  It’s an immersive visual experience, but its objectives remain tantalizingly out of reach.  Challenging and uncompromising, this film is not for everyone.  For cinephiles who enjoy the heavy lifting, however, there’s just enough weight to warrant the workout.

At its heart, Exhibition is a love triangle between two married artists and their modernist house.  The husband, H (Liam Gillick), knows that it’s time to leave, but his wife, D (Viviane Albertine), is reluctant to accept the truth.  We spend most of our time with D, quietly peering over her tightened shoulders.  She’s a struggling performance artist who mixes sexuality »

- J.R. Kinnard

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Daily | Joanna Hogg @FilmLinc

27 June 2014 6:36 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

"British filmmaker Joanna Hogg has made three intimate, sympathetic features in which vulnerable friends and family members attempt to hide secrets from each other within large houses and open frames," writes Aaron Cutler, who interviews Hogg for Artforum. Today we gather fresh reviews of Unrelated (2007), Archipelago (2009) and Exhibition (2013), all of which are screening at the Film Society of Lincoln Center. » - David Hudson »

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Interview: Joanna Hogg unravels 'Exhibition'

23 June 2014 4:29 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

Exhibition (2013), the latest film from British auteur Joanna Hogg, is a mysterious work that poses provocative questions about how we relate to the people and spaces around us. While most of the industry is mired in what director Mike Figgis once called "kitsch 'n' sink", Hogg is making original, formally adventurous works that burrows deep into the English metropolitan psyche. The trajectory of the characters in Exhibition is elusive; we may be witnessing disintegration, stasis or progression. Hogg's brilliance lies in the way she muddies the lines between these states, and how the amorphous outside forces of London can prompts a form or modern urban anxiety that bears down on our relationships. CineVue's Craig Williams recently spoke with her about her brave new work.

»

- CineVue UK

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Exhibition Review

22 June 2014 7:22 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Somewhere in England’s capital, a pair of married, middle-aged artists spend their days seeking creative inspiration inside their modernist home, a vertical palace of cold minimalism in which D (Viv Albertine) and her husband H (Liam Gillick) communicate largely via interhouse telecom. Though she appears bored, he’s too blind in his artistic and domestic contentment to notice, too concerned with his own work to see that his marriage has reached a stalemate. She finds more satisfaction in onanism, which she keeps secret from her pretentious, passively domineering husband, who removes the clothes from his wife during their alone time, as she dutifully lays on their bed, primed for a joyless fuck.

The idea that a setting is its own “character” is bandied around all too often, but in Exhibition the setting is as integral as the script – the house’s unique spiral staircases and sliding doors couldn’t be removed from the story, »

- Brogan Morris

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Conversaton with Joanna Hogg about Unrelated, Archipelago and Exhibition

22 June 2014 2:56 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Walking to the castle in Unrelated: "Anna wears that looks like a maternity dress. It belonged to Kathryn Worth's mother."

In part 2 of our conversation Joanna Hogg and I discuss the influence of Roberto Rossellini's Stromboli on Archipelago, how Edith Head would not have come upon Tom Hiddleston and Kathryn Worth's capes in Unrelated, the many roles Viv Albertine and Liam Gillick have in Exhibition, A Nos Amours starting with Chantal Akerman, Catherine Deneuve in Jacques Demy's Donkey Skin, and games people play.

Anne-Katrin Titze: Unrelated, Archipelago, Exhibition, each have totally distinct concepts about costumes.

Joanna Hogg: It's so much about the different stories. With Unrelated, there is a dress that Anna wears that looks like a maternity dress. It belonged to Kathryn Worth's mother. Stéphane [Collonge] and myself were looking at what Kathryn has of her own clothes that might fit into the story. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Outside Looking In: An Interview With Exhibition Director Joanna Hogg

20 June 2014 4:00 PM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

With her new film Exhibition beginning a two-week exclusive engagement at the Film Society of Lincoln Center today, along with her two previous films Unrelated and Archipelago getting theatrical runs concurrently, British filmmaker Joanna Hogg is in town and I was lucky enough to catch up with her for a chat. I saw Exhibition at last year's New York Film Festival and was blown away by it, so I was eager to pick her brains about her Antonioni-esque use of the environment in her family/relationship dramas. Unguarded and sincere, she opened up to all the questions and explained away lengthily much more so than many other directors I've talked with over the years. For this, I thank you Ms. Hogg.An exclusive theatrical run of Exhibition starts 6/20...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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Competition: Win Joanna Hogg's 'Exhibition' on DVD

20 June 2014 1:53 PM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

The latest triumph from acclaimed British director Joanna Hogg (Archipelago, Unrelated), Exhibition (2013) is an intimate, austere and remarkably engrossing portrait of a modern marriage gradually falling apart, as well as a revealing investigation into memory, architecture and the artistic process. To celebrate the home entertainment release of Hogg's strange and beautiful new endeavour, we have Three brand new DVD copies of Exhibition to give away to our regular returning readers, courtesy of the team at independent and world cinema distributors Artificial Eye. This is an exclusive competition for our Facebook and Twitter fans, so if you haven't already, 'Like' us at facebook.com/CineVueUK or follow us @CineVue before answering the question below.

»

- CineVue UK

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“A Relationship is Never a Straight Line”: Joanna Hogg on Exhibition

20 June 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

“It’d be nice if you could come up here, maybe distract me from my work,” H (Liam Gillick) tells his wife D (Viviane Albertine) at the start of Joanna Hogg’s surprising and stunning new film Exhibition. The two speak via intercom, from separate stories of their postmodern London behemoth, and Hogg’s film is as much about communication, or lack there of, as it is about staving off our most prized objectives. D and H — both artists, only one of whom is “successful” — have decided to sell their house after living there for nearly 20 years. That decision, or rather, acquiescence on D’s part, […] »

- Sarah Salovaara

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Review: Joanna Hogg's Exhibition Is An Exceptional 'Scenes From A Marriage'

19 June 2014 4:05 PM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

A three-story modern house is just as much a character in Joanna Hogg's Exhibition as a married artist couple (played by non actors Viv Albertine, of the punk rock band Slits, and artist Liam Gillick) who inhibit it. Equipped with floor to ceiling glass windows, a small lift, a spiral staircase, curtains and dividing screens, the building possesses strong sense of utilitarianism. The childless, middle aged couple have their own work spaces and talk to each other through intercoms whenever they need each other's company. He is a successful architect and she seems to be an artist who is still looking for her voice. At the moment, she is obsessed with recreating Ecstasy of St. Teresa with her own image. For hours on end, she poses...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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Review: Joanna Hogg's Brave, Cerebral But Unengaging 'Exhibition'

19 June 2014 4:01 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

It’s one of movieland’s minor mysteries that “Exhibition,” the third feature from British director Joanna Hogg, is the first to have been snapped up immediately for U.S. distribution: it is by some distance her least accessible movie, and features the smallest, cameo-level role from Tom Hiddleston, the bona-fide star whom Hogg is credited with discovering. And we can’t help but think it’s a shame, as her previous two films “Unrelated” and “Archipelago” are brilliantly chilly, incisive surgeries performed on the living patient that is the middle class British family, that are in themselves extremely uncompromising in terms of focus and ambivalence. But in “Exhibition” she narrows that focus so drastically that it feels like we’re at maximum zoom, looking more intently at the space between things, than the things themselves. It’s a very brave and unapologetically cerebral approach to have taken, but it »

- Jessica Kiang

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What to See or Skip This Weekend, From Must-See Indie Sci-Fi 'Coherence' to Eastwood's Musical 'Jersey Boys'

19 June 2014 2:23 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

If you're in New York or Los Angeles this weekend, run don't walk to James Ward Byrkit's dizzying metaphysical horror film "Coherence," or Roman Polanski's elegant pas-de-deux "Venus in Fur." But think twice before heading to Clint Eastwood's 1960s musical biopic "Jersey Boys," meeting a mixed critical response, or Paul Haggis' awful collage of interlocking soap operas "Third Person," currently crashing with reviewers. On the indie side of the spectrum, you can catch Brit Joanna Hogg's "Exhibition," starring Tom Hiddleston, which Indiewire says has shades of Michael Haneke by way of Miranda July; Filipino helmer Lav Diaz's latest multi-hour epic, "Norte, The End of History," will hold court at NY's Lincoln Center after a long festival tour dating back to Cannes 2013, where "Venus in Fur" also bowed; and Jan Troell's austere WWII-era psychodrama "The Last Sentence" hits select markets too. The film to see this weekend is "Coherence, »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Conversaton with Joanna Hogg about Unrelated, Archipelago and Exhibition

19 June 2014 12:10 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Kathryn Worth as Anna with Tom Hiddleston as Oakley in Unrelated: "What she really wants is to be part of a group."

When I met up with Joanna Hogg in New York at the Film Society of Lincoln Center she was preparing for the Us theatrical release of her latest film Exhibition, starring Viv Albertine and Liam Gillick with cameos from members of her Unrelated cast, Tom Hiddleston, Mary Roscoe and Harry Kershaw. Hiddleston also stars in her second film Archipelago with Lydia Leonard, Kate Fahy, Amy Lloyd and Christopher Baker.

Joanna was selected in 2013 to have her films screened in the Emerging Artists program along with Fernando Eimbcke at the 51st New York Film Festival.

In part 1 of our conversation we discussed D and H as not in Dh Lawrence, Stéphane Collonge's production design, turning absence into a character, how to begin and what an arranged marriage »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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2014 | 2013 | 2012

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