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What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 5: 2000–2017

24 March 2017 2:02 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Mira Nair and Ava DuVernay: Wikimedia Commons/IndiaFM/Bollywoodhungama/usbotschaftberlin

by Carrie Rickey

This five-part Truthdig series by Carrie Rickey is published in partnership with Women and Hollywood. The series considers the historic accomplishments of women behind the camera, how they got marginalized, and how they are fighting for equal employment. Specifically, this series asks, why do females make up between 33 and 50 percent of film-school graduates but account for only seven percent of working directors? What happened to the women directors in Hollywood?

Female filmmakers greeted the 21st century with optimism. By most measures, movies by women were garnering increased respect in the industry and at the multiplex. Their makers cracked glass ceilings, created new genres, and established new box-office records.

With “Nowhere in Africa” (2001), Caroline Link became the second woman to direct the Oscar-winner for the year’s best foreign film. With “Lost in Translation” (2003), Sofia Coppola was the third woman to receive a best director nomination from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. And with “The Hurt Locker” (2009), Kathryn Bigelow was the fourth woman nominated in the directing category — and the first to win. The following year, Danish filmmaker Susanna Bier directed the winner in the best foreign film category, “In a Better World.”

Gina Prince-Bythewood’s “Love & Basketball” (2000), Karyn Kusama’s “Girlfight” (2000) and Gurinder Chadha’s “Bend It Like Beckham” (2003) created what might be called the “Title IX” movie, celebrating female athletes on the court, in the ring, and on the field. These are sports movies that celebrate the female body — not for its sex appeal, but for its power. These films inspired younger women (and their mothers were thrilled to take them to movies that didn’t objectify women).

Comedies by women continued to make serious box office, proving the Hollywood wisdom that “funny is money.” Nancy Meyers’ “What Women Want” (2000), starring Mel Gibson as a player briefly given the power to hear what women think about him, made $374 million. Sharon Maguire’s “Bridget Jones’s Diary” (2001), in which the title character says what she thinks about womanizers and prigs, brought in $282 million. Movies like these permitted men and women to laugh at men’s foibles.

From Patricia Cardoso’s “Real Women Have Curves” (2002), which introduced America Ferrera as a college-bound Latina, to Julie Taymor’s biopic “Frida” (2003), with Salma Hayek as Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, to Patty Jenkins’ “Monster” (2003), with Charlize Theron as serial killer Aileen Wuornos, audiences saw realistic women — as opposed to human swizzle sticks with breasts — in movies by women.

Many critics hailed Niki Caro’s “Whale Rider” (2003), about a Maori preteen who challenges her tribal patriarchy and becomes the new chief, as a harbinger of the triumph of female filmmakers over the status quo. Others pointed to the fact that for the first time since records had been kept, in 2000 women made 11 percent of the top 250 box office films. For women who make movies, the new century felt like a new day.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Sadly, that encouraging percentage turned out to be a fluke. After 2000, the number dwindled. It remains stuck in the 6 to 9 percent range, says Martha Lauzen, professor of communications and head of the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film at San Diego State University. Since 1998 Lauzen has tracked women working in the industry in her annual “Celluloid Ceiling” report.

“When I started this, I thought it was merely an issue of people not knowing how low the numbers were,” Lauzen said ruefully. “I didn’t know how slow social change is.”

Lauzen’s reporting represents one of three vital resources for understanding the triumphs female filmmakers have made and how far they need to go to achieve parity with men. The others are Stacy Smith’s Media Diversity and Social Change Institute at USC’s Annenberg School and The Bunche Center at UCLA.

Collectively and individually, these creators of annual good news/bad news reports have kept the issue of representation in the public eye.

The Good: For Kathryn Bigelow (“The Hurt Locker,” “Zero Dark Thirty”), the late Nora Ephron (“Julie & Julia”), and Nancy Meyers (“It’s Complicated,” “The Intern”), the 21st century has been a fruitful time. So, too, for younger female moviemakers. Consider Lisa Cholodenko (“Laurel Canyon,” “The Kids Are All Right”), Ava DuVernay (“Selma,” “13th”), and Mira Nair (“Monsoon Wedding,” “The Namesake”).

Consider also that Catherine Hardwicke established a franchise with “Twilight” (which made $393 million), Sam Taylor-Johnson created another with “50 Shades of Grey” ($571 million), and that Anne Fletcher’s “The Proposal” made $317 million and Phyllida Lloyd’s “Mamma Mia!” earned $609 million.

Additionally, filmmakers like Dee Rees (“Pariah”), Debra Granik (“Winter’s Bone”), and Lone Scherfig (“An Education”) broke into the market with unique visions and eyes for new talent, including Adepero Oduye, Jennifer Lawrence, and Carey Mulligan. Significantly, Vicky Jenson (“Shrek”), Jennifer Lee (“Frozen”), Jennifer Yuh Nelson (“Kung Fu Panda 2”), and Brenda Chapman (“Brave”) staked a place for women in animation.

The Bad: For every woman appearing onscreen in movies in 2015 there were 2.3 men, according to Stacy Smith’s Media Diversity & Social Change Initiative.

The Ugly: When Walt Hickey, culture reporter for the website fivethirtyeight.com, goes to the movies and sees the screen population is 69 percent male, it just looks wrong to him. “It’s like something apocalyptic has happened, like a parallel universe — a man’s world,” he says.

Both Lauzen’s and Smith’s data show that when a woman is behind the camera and/or screenplay, 39 percent of protagonists are female. In movies by male directors, only four percent of the lead characters are female.

A century ago, male dominance behind the camera and on the screen was not the norm. For women behind the camera, it’s been the norm since 1920. And for women onscreen, it’s been the norm since 1950. Because of this, moviegoers have a distorted picture of America as predominantly male and predominantly Caucasian, when it is neither. (For finer-grain data on minority representation, see this annual report from UCLA’s Bunche Center.)

The Force Reawakens

The Hollywood Dream Factory tailors the majority of its product to the measurements of the men in the audience. This troubles those who want their daughters to partake of the same professional opportunities, cultural representation, and dream lives as their sons. While “Nine to Five,” “Norma Rae,” and “Erin Brockovich” show that studios love stories of women who triumph over the odds, there is less obvious love for female filmmakers trying to beat the odds stacked against them in their professional lives.

Since the Original Six filed suit against two studios in 1983 (see Part 3), female filmmakers have met, strategized, and troubleshot. So much so that in one of her final essays before her death in 2012, Nora Ephron made a list of “Things I Won’t Miss.” Near the top: “Panels on Women in Film.” Many women in film felt as though they were running in place.

“Instead of holding a million panels about it,” Christine Vachon, producer of “Boys Don’t Cry” and “Carol,” exclaimed at the 2016 Sundance Festival, “let’s do something about it!”

Someone had. She is Maria Giese, director of the feature films “When Saturday Comes” and “Hunger.” In February 2013 she brought a complaint to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (Eeoc) in Los Angeles. Her contention was that the cohort of working filmmakers in the Directors Guild of America (DGA), of which she is a member, was overwhelmingly male.

(While the number of women in the guild directing episodic television amounts to 17 percent, the DGA 2015 census of female filmmakers registered 6.4 percent. That’s lower than the nine percent of female coal miners, and fractional next to the 32 percent of practicing physicians and 36 percent of practicing lawyers who are women).

The Eeoc, which collects data on employer/employee relations for each calendar year, was reluctant to take on a class-action suit.

In April 2013, Giese contacted the Aclu of Southern California and showed the evidence to Melissa Goodman, director of its Lgbtq, Gender & Reproductive Justice Project. For the next two years Goodman and her colleague Ariela Migdal took testimony from more than 50 female directors. In May 2015 they sent the Eeoc an extraordinary letter that counted the ways in which “female filmmakers are effectively excluded from directing big-budget films and seriously underrepresented in television.” A compelling argument in their letter: “The entertainment industry employs many people and makes products that profoundly shape our culture and the perception of women and girls.” Later in 2015, the Eeoc commenced its own investigation.

In January 2017, based on a high-level internal DGA leak received by Giese, Deadline Hollywood reported that after a federal investigation spanning a year that included testimony from over 100 women directors, the Eeoc recently served charges of sex discrimination and unfair hiring practice against all six major studios. While the federal agency does not comment on active cases, Gillian Thomas and Melissa Goodman of the Aclu wrote in an editorial that they had no reason to doubt the veracity of the leak.

A key factor contributing to Giese’s success in getting this issue to the Aclu and Eeoc was her ability to expose the structural obstacles female filmmakers face, from a guild that puts female and minority filmmakers in the same category, to the studios that question the fitness of women to direct.

Myths and Continued Underrepresentation

Over the 25 years I’ve reported on female filmmakers, I’ve interviewed two generations of movie executives. Most, but not all, were male. Most took seriously my questions about the apparent exclusion of women behind the camera, both on the screen and their forthcoming line-up.

Without exception, all of them retold one or more of the “Three Hollywood Myths.”

Myth #1) “Women don’t want to direct action movies and those are the films which are making money.”

Untrue. See: Martha Coolidge’s “Real Genius” (1985), Kathryn Bigelow’s “Point Break” (1991), Mimi Leder’s “The Peacemaker” (1997) and “Deep Impact” (1998), Lexi Alexander’s “Punisher: War Zone” (2008), and Bigelow’s “The Hurt Locker” (2009) and “Zero Dark Thirty” (2012).

What is true is that Patty Jenkins was hired to direct “Thor: The Dark World” (2013) and left due to creative differences. She is now working on the forthcoming “Wonder Woman.”

What is true is that Mira Nair was offered a “Harry Potter” film and chose instead to make the family drama “The Namesake” because the material was more important to her, and that Ava DuVernay was offered “Black Panther,” the film version of the Marvel Comics series, and declined for similar reasons.

Myth #2) “Movies by women don’t make money.”

Untrue again. Some movies by women don’t make back their investment, just as some movies by men do not. What is true is that many movies by women make major bank. Catherine Hardwicke’s little $37 million film “Twilight” grossed $393 million and launched a billion-dollar franchise.

Hardwicke told me by phone that she hears all the time from studios that films by women are poor investments. “And every time you say, ‘Well, this one made money, that one made money,’ they say, ‘This one made money because it was based on a best-selling book,’ or ‘That one made money because of its hot actress.’”

Here are six more films by women and their box-office grosses. They made money because they powerfully connected with audiences.

Bend it Like Beckham” (Gurinder Chadha). Cost: $6 million/Gross: $77 million“Frida” (Julie Taymor). Cost: $12 million/Gross: $56 million“Frozen” (Jennifer Lee). Cost: $150 million/Gross: $1.2 billion“The Proposal” (Anne Fletcher). Cost: $40 million/Gross: $317 million“Selma” (Ava DuVernay). Cost: $20 million/Gross $67 million“Lost in Translation” (Sofia Coppola). Cost: $4 million/Gross $120 million

Myth #3) “A woman behind the camera means women on the screen and no men in the audience.”

Untrue, if taken literally. Sometimes movies by women have a lower percentage of men in the audience, just as sometimes movies by men have a lower percentage of women in the audience. Take, for example, the 2015 films, “Bridge of Spies” by Steven Spielberg and “The Intern” by Nancy Meyers.

According to Paul Dergarabedian of comScore, the research company’s “PostTrak” data shows the audience gender breakdown at “Bridge of Spies,” a ’60s-era political thriller starring Tom Hanks, was 54 percent male and 46 percent female. For “The Intern,” a contemporary workplace comedy co-starring Anne Hathaway and Robert De Niro, it was 41 percent male and 59 percent female. Spielberg’s film grossed $165 million; Meyers’ $194 million. His budget was $40 million; hers was $35 million.

Ava DuVernay’s “Selma,” the story of the 1965 march for voting rights led by Martin Luther King and starring David Oyelowo, had an audience gender breakdown of 47 percent male and 53 percent female. The assumption that movies come gendered with a blue or pink ribbon is a canard that still lingers in Hollywood, perhaps a vestige of the target marketing that began in the 1980s.

Speaking from the set of “Queen Sugar” in 2016, DuVernay observed, “We’re in a place right now where every other film is about a comic book superhero. We’re top-heavy with testosterone.”

How did Hollywood, a century ago a place where female directors thrived and prospered, come to this?

Stacy Title, director of “The Last Supper” and “The Bye Bye Man,” points the finger at “unconscious bias.”

Mira Nair, who was born in India, suspects chauvinism. “I’ve always remarked at the irony that the percentage of female directors is higher in India than in the United States,” she explained in a phone conversation. “India is supposed to be the traditional chauvinist culture,” she observes. Nair wonders if the historic examples of female prime ministers in South Asia — Indira Gandhi in India, Benazir Bhutto in Pakistan — may have broken the glass ceiling for all professional women there. “Their examples don’t exist in the U.S.”

DuVernay looks forward to the outcome — and hoped-for positive resolution — of the Eeoc investigation. “It’s a systematic problem and it requires radical change,” she said. “If it’s not happening organically, systems should be put in place.” Like many female filmmakers, DuVernay hopes the Eeoc can reconfigure what Giese calls the “vertical playing field for women” into a level one.

“One thing I’m heartened by,” said Nair, who’s been making features for nearly 30 years, “is that the variety and confidence of female filmmakers today is inspiring.”

Do others think it’s changed for the better for women since the 1980s?

“For me, there’s no comparison between the ’80s and now,” reflected Nancy Meyers, whose six films as a director or writer/director have grossed more than a billion dollars. By email she wrote:

Men were still getting used to us being on set in the ’80s. (Men used to have photos of pinups on the set in the ’80s! I’m not kidding.)The only women around back then worked in costumes and hair and makeup. Today women are in every department and often department heads. There are still very few women in the camera department and that’s a shame. That seems to still be a real boy’s club. Today, most crew members are far more comfortable working for and with women.

Yet one thing has not changed: “Now, getting the job to be the director — that’s still an uphill battle,” Meyers said.

In addition to writing film reviews and essays for Truthdig, Carrie Rickey has been a film critic at The Philadelphia Inquirer and Village Voice, and an art critic at Artforum and Art in America. Rickey has taught at various institutions, including School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania, and has appeared frequently on NPR’s “Talk of the Nation,” MSNBC, and CNN.

What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 5: 2000–2017 was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Women and Hollywood

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Cate Blanchett gets a new sparring partner, Kristen Wiig

24 March 2017 9:36 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

by Murtada

Cate Blanchett always manages to get sizzling chemistry with her female co-stars, whether the story they are in is sapphic or not. She had it with Judi Dench playing the architect of her destruction in Notes on a Scandal (2007). And with Sally Hawkins as her curtseying worse gened adoptive sister in Blue Jasmine (2013). Most famously, she had it with Rooney Mara as the girl flung out of space in Carol (2015). In the same movie she etched a believable and palpable friendship with Sarah Paulson. We assume she’ll do it again with Paulson next year in Ocean’s Eight (and with Sandra Bullock, Rihanna et al).Those set pictures don’t lie. And now we can add Kristen Wiig to the list.

They already make each other laugh

In the adaptation of Maria Semple’s bestselling novel Where’d You Go, Bernadette, to be directed by Richard Linklater, »

- Murtada Elfadl

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Chuck Berry: Looking Back at His 20 Greatest Songs

20 March 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

This article originally appeared on EW.com.

In his 90 years, Chuck Berry — who died Saturday in Missouri — recorded hundreds of songs, including 13 top 10 R&B hits and seven pop smashes. Regardless of chart success, his work went on to inspire multiple generations of artists, many of whom paid tribute to the rock architect with covers.

Berry’s final tracks will appear on the upcoming album, Chuck, his first new release since 1979. Announced on his 90th birthday last October, the album features his children, Charles Berry Jr. and Ingrid, on guitar and harmonica, and is dedicated to his wife of 68 years, »

- Jim Farber

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Summer Storm

18 March 2017 11:42 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

 

Here’s a real gem — a ‘classic’ Chekhov story turned into a compelling tale of lust and murder. George Sanders and Linda Darnell shine as a judge and the peasant girl who intrigues him; Edward Everett Horton is excellent cast against type in a dramatic role.

Summer Storm

DVD

Sprocket Vault / Kit Parker

1944 / B&W / 1:37 Academy / 106 min. / Street Date October 20, 2009 (I’m a little late) / available through Sprocket Vault / 14.99

Starring: George Sanders, Edward Everett Horton, Linda Darnell, Anna Lee, Hugo Haas, Lori Lahner, Sig Ruman, Robert Greig, Byron Foulger, Mike Mazurki, Elizabeth Russell.

Cinematography: Archie Stout, Eugen Schüfftan

Art Direction: Rudi Feld

Collaborating Editor: Gregg G. Tallas

Original Music: Karl Hajos

Written by Roland Leigh, Douglas Sirk (as Michael O’Hara), Robert Theoren based on the play The Shooting Party by Anton Chekhov

Produced by Seymour Nebenzal

Directed by Douglas Sirk

 

Douglas Sirk, born Hans Detlef Sierck, had a pretty amazing career. »

- Glenn Erickson

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'Song to Song' Review: Terrence Malick's Austin-Music Movie Is One Texas Turkey

15 March 2017 2:19 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

The music scene in Austin, Texas, is alive with talent and energy – and you hope that energy would inspire Terrence Malick, who lives there, to bust out of the filmmaking funk of his recent work (Knight of Cups, To the Wonder). No such luck. Despite a few glimpses of Iggy Pop, Flea, Lykke Li and Big Freedia in live performance, Song to Song has no music in its DNA, not to mention its soul. Instead, Malick indulges in his usual visual tropes, having characters wander around aimlessly while muttering their mock-profound thoughts in voiceover. »

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‘Holy Motors’ Director Leos Carax Will Soon Start Production on ‘Annette’ With Adam Driver and Rihanna

14 March 2017 1:12 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Amazon Studios has acquired the U.S. and Canadian distribution rights to “Annette,” starring Adam Driver and Rihanna, as reported by Variety. The musical drama will be helmed by French director Leos Carax (“Holy Motors”), who’s working in English for the first time.

“I hope to make a film one day that will be music. I wanted life in music, that is what I wanted here,” Carax told IndieWire’s Eric Kohn back in 2012. Now, he gets to do exactly that.

Shooting for “Annette” will begin in the spring and include several international locations. The film will feature original songs by American art-rock band Sparks.

Read More: Film Acquisition Rundown: Grasshopper Film Gets ‘Escapes,’ Amazon and IFC Films Date ‘City of Ghosts’ and More

Annette” follows a stand-up comedian who is faced with the reality of caking care of his 2-year-old daughter after his opera singer wife dies. But »

- Yoselin Acevedo

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We Haven’t Seen The McU’s Latest Concept Art, But We Can Describe It

11 March 2017 8:36 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

It turns out that what you really need to get the inside scoop into the biggest films isn’t a busy rolodex of contacts or a thrumming rumor mill, but a couple of shares in Disney. I’m deeply envious of the lucky attendees of the recent Disney shareholders meeting in Denver, who not only got to see a selection of footage from The Last Jedi, but previews of most of the upcoming McU big hitters.

/Film’s inside source, shareholder Michael Hansen, has the scoop, telling us they got a look at Anna and Elsa in Frozen 2 – “Elsa had a blue, velvet-looking dress” – clips from Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 -“Baby Groot sitting in a seat on the Milano as Star-Lord yells back “Groot, put your seatbelt on!” – a first look at Cate Blanchett in action in Thor: Ragnarok in which it’s revealed that she has »

- David James

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Focus Features Hires Veteran Publicity Executive Dani Weinstein

10 March 2017 9:07 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Focus Features has hired veteran executive Dani Weinstein — who has worked extensively on the Weinstein Company’s awards campaigns — as executive vice president of publicity.

Weinstein will oversee theatrical publicity efforts for the entire Focus Features slate, including all awards campaigns. She will be based in New York and report to Jason Cassidy, Focus Features’ president of marketing.

“Dani is a consummate professional who has an incredible track record for spearheading breakthrough publicity campaigns for specialty titles,” said Cassidy. “Her breadth of experience working with world class filmmakers and talent, and collaborative style of leadership, makes her uniquely qualified. We’re thrilled that she is joining the Focus team.”

Weinstein has spent two decades in the entertainment industry. She has spent most of the last 17 years with TWC and Miramax, culminating as the studio’s president of publicity.

Her tenure included the campaign for “The King’s Speech,” which won »

- Dave McNary

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The Weinstein Company 2017 Release Calendar: Here’s the Oscar Hopefuls, and the Damaged Goods

9 March 2017 9:29 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

May 2015 was the last time Harvey Weinstein hosted a Cannes presentation at the Majestic Hotel. Among the titles was a preview of Justin Chadwick’s “Tulip Fever,” with the then white-hot Swedish actress Alicia Vikander on hand. A romantic triangle period piece costarring Christoph Waltz and Dane DeHaan, Weinstein later pushed the release from July 2016 to February 2017. Now, two years later, it’s booked for August 25 — the dog days of summer.

Last year, the Weinstein Co. had so few bonafide Oscar contenders on the docket that they didn’t mount their usual Cannes show-and-tell at all. Garth Davis’s “Lion” did yield six nominations and, like critics’ darling “Carol” the year before, no wins. The lengthy awards season did pay off for “Lion” at the box office; it’s made $103 million worldwide. However, it also represents a rare tick in the ‘win’ column for TWC, which is struggling to maneuver in these challenging times. »

- Anne Thompson

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The Weinstein Company 2017 Release Calendar: Here’s the Hopefuls, and the Damaged Goods

9 March 2017 9:29 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

May 2015 was the last time Harvey Weinstein hosted a Cannes presentation at the Majestic Hotel. Among the titles was a preview of Justin Chadwick’s “Tulip Fever,” with the then white-hot Swedish actress Alicia Vikander on hand. A romantic triangle period piece costarring Christoph Waltz and Dane DeHaan, Weinstein later pushed the release from July 2016 to February 2017. Now, two years later, it’s booked for August 25 — the dog days of summer.

Last year, the Weinstein Co. had so few bonafide Oscar contenders on the docket that they didn’t mount their usual Cannes show-and-tell at all. Garth Davis’s “Lion” did yield six nominations and, like critics’ darling “Carol” the year before, no wins. The lengthy awards season did pay off for “Lion” at the box office; it’s made $103 million worldwide. However, it also represents a rare tick in the ‘win’ column for TWC, which is struggling to maneuver in these challenging times. »

- Anne Thompson

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‘Carol’ Without Women is Like The Worst Terrence Malick Movie Ever Made — Watch

8 March 2017 1:56 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Trains, toys, and Kyle Chandler’s furrowed brow — that’s what you get when you watch “Carol” without women.

In honor of International Women’s Day, women around the world are striking from unpaid and paid labor in an act of solidarity highlighting women’s contributions to the workforce. In honor of the strike, dubbed “Day Without a Woman,” this oddly moving video essay presents every scene in Todd Haynes’ 2015 masterpiece, “Carol,” that does not feature a woman.

Read More: IndieWire Stands With Women: 27 TV Shows Created by Women, Starring Women, That We Absolutely Love

From the opening credits to Kyle Chandler and the other guys in the movie, “Carol” without women plays like six minutes of a discarded idea for a Terrence Malick film. Without the film’s two leads, Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara, the film doesn’t deliver much. “Carol,” which was written by Phyllis Nagy and »

- Jude Dry

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Toby Oliver Acs || Get Out || Cinematography Series

4 March 2017 10:27 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Get Out, a genre sleeper hit rightfully boasted as having spawned ‘From the mind of Jordan Peele’, has seized online review aggregators & the box office as its own. Making back ($33.4m), already, nearly 6 times its budget ($4.5m) in its debuting weekend, Get Out looks to grow in the comings weeks and has, as of March 3rd massed a $57.8 million gross revenue. Careers have been secured.

Pivotal to the realization of this social thriller: Toby Oliver Acs, a veteran of small feature budgets and cutthroat schedules, applied his technical prowess and distinct eye to Jordan Peele’s idiosyncratic vision. His background in documentary as well as narrative features seems to lend him balance and clarity throughout his cinematographic perspective. Get Out, both in tonality & Oliver’s light and lensing, begins grounded and transitions to something weirder and surreal. The language Oliver developed alongside writer/director Jordan Peele helps accennuate this change. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Aaron Hunt)

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Toby Oliver Acs || Get Out || Cinematography Series

4 March 2017 10:27 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Get Out, a genre sleeper hit rightfully boasted as having spawned ‘From the mind of Jordan Peele’, has seized online review aggregators & the box office as its own. Making back ($33.4m), already, nearly 6 times its budget ($4.5m) in its debuting weekend, Get Out looks to grow in the comings weeks and has, as of March 3rd massed a $57.8 million gross revenue. Careers have been secured.

Pivotal to the realization of this social thriller: Toby Oliver Acs, a veteran of small feature budgets and cutthroat schedules, applied his technical prowess and distinct eye to Jordan Peele’s idiosyncratic vision. His background in documentary as well as narrative features seems to lend him balance and clarity throughout his cinematographic perspective. Get Out, both in tonality & Oliver’s light and lensing, begins grounded and transitions to something weirder and surreal. The language Oliver developed alongside writer/director Jordan Peele helps accennuate this change. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Aaron Hunt)

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Toby Oliver Acs || Get Out || Cinematography Series

4 March 2017 10:27 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Get Out, a genre sleeper hit rightfully boasted as having spawned ‘From the mind of Jordan Peele’, has seized online review aggregators & the box office as its own. Making back ($33.4m), already, nearly 6 times its budget ($4.5m) in its debuting weekend, Get Out looks to grow in the comings weeks and has, as of March 3rd massed a $57.8 million gross revenue. Careers have been secured.

Pivotal to the realization of this social thriller: Toby Oliver Acs, a veteran of small feature budgets and cutthroat schedules, applied his technical prowess and distinct eye to Jordan Peele’s idiosyncratic vision. His background in documentary as well as narrative features seems to lend him balance and clarity throughout his cinematographic perspective. Get Out, both in tonality & Oliver’s light and lensing, begins grounded and transitions to something weirder and surreal. The language Oliver developed alongside writer/director Jordan Peele helps accennuate this change. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Aaron Hunt)

Permalink | Report a problem


Toby Oliver Acs || Get Out || Cinematography Series

4 March 2017 10:27 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Get Out, a genre sleeper hit rightfully boasted as having spawned ‘From the mind of Jordan Peele’, has seized online review aggregators & the box office as its own. Making back ($33.4m), already, nearly 6 times its budget ($4.5m) in its debuting weekend, Get Out looks to grow in the comings weeks and has, as of March 3rd massed a $57.8 million gross revenue. Careers have been secured.

Pivotal to the realization of this social thriller: Toby Oliver Acs, a veteran of small feature budgets and cutthroat schedules, applied his technical prowess and distinct eye to Jordan Peele’s idiosyncratic vision. His background in documentary as well as narrative features seems to lend him balance and clarity throughout his cinematographic perspective. Get Out, both in tonality & Oliver’s light and lensing, begins grounded and transitions to something weirder and surreal. The language Oliver developed alongside writer/director Jordan Peele helps accennuate this change. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Aaron Hunt)

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Toby Oliver Acs || Get Out || Cinematography Series

4 March 2017 10:27 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Get Out, a genre sleeper hit rightfully boasted as having spawned ‘From the mind of Jordan Peele’, has seized online review aggregators & the box office as its own. Making back ($33.4m), already, nearly 6 times its budget ($4.5m) in its debuting weekend, Get Out looks to grow in the comings weeks and has, as of March 3rd massed a $57.8 million gross revenue. Careers have been secured.

Pivotal to the realization of this social thriller: Toby Oliver Acs, a veteran of small feature budgets and cutthroat schedules, applied his technical prowess and distinct eye to Jordan Peele’s idiosyncratic vision. His background in documentary as well as narrative features seems to lend him balance and clarity throughout his cinematographic perspective. Get Out, both in tonality & Oliver’s light and lensing, begins grounded and transitions to something weirder and surreal. The language Oliver developed alongside writer/director Jordan Peele helps accennuate this change. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Aaron Hunt)

Permalink | Report a problem


Toby Oliver Acs || Get Out || Cinematography Series

4 March 2017 10:27 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Get Out, a genre sleeper hit rightfully boasted as having spawned ‘From the mind of Jordan Peele’, has seized online review aggregators & the box office as its own. Making back ($33.4m), already, nearly 6 times its budget ($4.5m) in its debuting weekend, Get Out looks to grow in the comings weeks and has, as of March 3rd massed a $57.8 million gross revenue. Careers have been secured.

Pivotal to the realization of this social thriller: Toby Oliver Acs, a veteran of small feature budgets and cutthroat schedules, applied his technical prowess and distinct eye to Jordan Peele’s idiosyncratic vision. His background in documentary as well as narrative features seems to lend him balance and clarity throughout his cinematographic perspective. Get Out, both in tonality & Oliver’s light and lensing, begins grounded and transitions to something weirder and surreal. The language Oliver developed alongside writer/director Jordan Peele helps accennuate this change. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Aaron Hunt)

Permalink | Report a problem


Toby Oliver Acs || Get Out || Cinematography Series

4 March 2017 10:27 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Get Out, a genre sleeper hit rightfully boasted as having spawned ‘From the mind of Jordan Peele’, has seized online review aggregators & the box office as its own. Making back ($33.4m), already, nearly 6 times its budget ($4.5m) in its debuting weekend, Get Out looks to grow in the comings weeks and has, as of March 3rd massed a $57.8 million gross revenue. Careers have been secured.

Pivotal to the realization of this social thriller: Toby Oliver Acs, a veteran of small feature budgets and cutthroat schedules, applied his technical prowess and distinct eye to Jordan Peele’s idiosyncratic vision. His background in documentary as well as narrative features seems to lend him balance and clarity throughout his cinematographic perspective. Get Out, both in tonality & Oliver’s light and lensing, begins grounded and transitions to something weirder and surreal. The language Oliver developed alongside writer/director Jordan Peele helps accennuate this change. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Aaron Hunt)

Permalink | Report a problem


Toby Oliver Acs || Get Out || Cinematography Series

4 March 2017 10:27 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Get Out, a genre sleeper hit rightfully boasted as having spawned ‘From the mind of Jordan Peele’, has seized online review aggregators & the box office as its own. Making back ($33.4m), already, nearly 6 times its budget ($4.5m) in its debuting weekend, Get Out looks to grow in the comings weeks and has, as of March 3rd massed a $57.8 million gross revenue. Careers have been secured.

Pivotal to the realization of this social thriller: Toby Oliver Acs, a veteran of small feature budgets and cutthroat schedules, applied his technical prowess and distinct eye to Jordan Peele’s idiosyncratic vision. His background in documentary as well as narrative features seems to lend him balance and clarity throughout his cinematographic perspective. Get Out, both in tonality & Oliver’s light and lensing, begins grounded and transitions to something weirder and surreal. The language Oliver developed alongside writer/director Jordan Peele helps accennuate this change. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Aaron Hunt)

Permalink | Report a problem


Toby Oliver Acs || Get Out || Cinematography Series

4 March 2017 10:27 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Get Out, a genre sleeper hit rightfully boasted as having spawned ‘From the mind of Jordan Peele’, has seized online review aggregators & the box office as its own. Making back ($33.4m), already, nearly 6 times its budget ($4.5m) in its debuting weekend, Get Out looks to grow in the comings weeks and has, as of March 3rd massed a $57.8 million gross revenue. Careers have been secured.

Pivotal to the realization of this social thriller: Toby Oliver Acs, a veteran of small feature budgets and cutthroat schedules, applied his technical prowess and distinct eye to Jordan Peele’s idiosyncratic vision. His background in documentary as well as narrative features seems to lend him balance and clarity throughout his cinematographic perspective. Get Out, both in tonality & Oliver’s light and lensing, begins grounded and transitions to something weirder and surreal. The language Oliver developed alongside writer/director Jordan Peele helps accennuate this change. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Aaron Hunt)

Permalink | Report a problem


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