7.4/10
5,470
35 user 139 critic

Still Life (2013)

Trailer
1:43 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

A council case worker looks for the relatives of those found dead and alone.

Director:

Writer:

18 wins & 5 nominations. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Kelly Stoke
Karen Drury ...
Mary
...
Council Manager
...
Shakthi
David Shaw Parker ...
Billy Stoke's Caretaker
...
Caretaker
Ciaran McIntyre ...
Jumbo
...
Homeless Man
...
Homeless Man
...
Morgue Attendant
Leon Silver ...
Crematorium Attendant
...
Prison Officer
...
Garry
...
Lucy
Edit

Storyline

Still Life is a poignant, quixotic tale of life, love and the afterlife. Meticulous and organized to the point of obsession, John May (Eddie Marsan) is a council worker charged with finding the next of kin of those who have died alone. When his department is downsized, John must up his efforts on his final case, taking him on a liberating journey that allows him to start living life at last. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

For John May, life is looking up.

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

12 December 2013 (Italy)  »

Also Known As:

Mr. May und das Flüstern der Ewigkeit  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The song played at the Greek left-handed bouzouki player's funeral (second in order at the start of the movie) is Misirlou, a song of numerous covers and versions in discography, famously appearing in the Pulp Fiction soundtrack, amongst others. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Film '72: Episode #44.4 (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Scotland the Brave
Traditional
Performed by The Pipes and Drums of the 1st Royal Tank Regiment
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Incredibly moving

Inherent in the very title of the film Still Life lies its biggest challenge – how to convey a sense of stillness in a medium that by its very name is supposed to, yes, move. And yet, Uberto Pasolini, who wrote and directed Still Life, rivals the Flemish masters of old. What a triumph. What layers of plot intertwined with those images to tell the story of a man who will break your heart a thousand times in each still life moment he creates in his very, very, very deliberate life. I am grateful to have seen this movie.

I named some of the still life images that were seared in my mind. Man in Kitchen with Plate on Drainboard. Man at Bus Stop… Alone. Safe Office Prison. Happy Death. Train Ride with Meat Pie. They go on and on. Two Drunks on Steps. Each and every scene is a moving still life that speaks to a life of safe deliberation that turns to moving outside the net of safety, that is punishable by death. We all know the dangers of leaving safe plodding behind. Those moments outside the box of life's monotony will be worth it in the end – and they were.

The acting is perfection. I'm sure even Lucian Freud would want to paint the actors Pasolini gathered for this film. How can we thank Eddie Marsan for bringing Mr. May to life with such dignity, charm and humor? Does he utter more than fifty words in the entire film? I don't think so, and yet, I heard his voice through the entire showing. And, Joanne Froggatt, (yes, from Downton Abbey), gifts us with a portrayal of Kelly Stoke that is the perfect answer to Marsan's May.

I have to confess when I went to the film I didn't realize that Pasolini was the producer of The Full Monty, The Emperor's New Clothes, and The Closer You Get. Producer? No way. Stick with writing and directing, sir. You are surely one of the best in the business.

Death will come to us all. It is our hope that we never die alone, with no one to celebrate our lives afterward. In fact, few of us think about those that do die without anyone to put them to rest. Still Life will change a lot of things for you if you can take it in as if it were a museum tour of a great exhibit. I think it's a 'see it more than once' film for sure. And yes, forgive the pun, it is an incredibly moving experience.

This might be The Hampton Film Festival's best sleeper this year. Congratulations. Oh, and thank you.


58 of 60 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?