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Folie à Deux: Madness Made of Two (2012)

Folie à Deux - madness made of two is set in one of England's finest houses. The central character, Helen Heraty, is a tour de force - beautiful with typical English Rose looks (she was the... See full summary »

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Folie à Deux - madness made of two is set in one of England's finest houses. The central character, Helen Heraty, is a tour de force - beautiful with typical English Rose looks (she was the face of LK Bennett in 2010) but no wallflower. Always ready for a fight, Helen is ambitious, strong, brave single mother with 7 children and a dream to turn one of Britain's most historical buildings into a 72-roomed boutique hotel. She lives her life with a conviction that borders on madness and when the financial crisis and family tragedy threatens to crush her dream it is her strength of character that will have you saluting her and wanting to share her extraordinary story with others. Written by Margareta Szabo

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4 October 2013 (UK)  »

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Hotel Folly  »

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A Grand Design that Ultimately Reveals the Folly of Hubris
17 November 2013 | by (London) – See all my reviews

Helen Heraty and her partner John Edwards decide to buy a 72-room mansion in York, northern England, but then discover to their cost that renovating it proves prohibitively expensive. Eventually the task is accomplished, but at what cost? John dies of a heart attack, leaving Helen to manage the place on her own. Ostensibly about the effect of Britain's economic crisis on individuals, HOTEL FOLLY is much more about the consequences of hubris; hubris on Helen's part, as her obsession with trying to renovate the property blinds her to everything and everyone around her. The smallest things begin to affect her - for example, the dispute with the National Trust (her immediate neighbors) over the courtyard in front of her property. Rather than negotiating a settlement, she prefers to adopt an aggressive approach with inevitable consequences. The film has a certain macabre fascination, as we watch Helen becoming embroiled in conflict after conflict, while desperately trying to raise money from any source she can, but she is fundamentally an unattractive personality. You feel sorry for her family; her seven children, the poor animals (who become more and more neglected) and the luckless John trying - and failing - to cope with impossibly stressful situations.


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