IMDb > "Faith" (2012) > Reviews & Ratings - IMDb

Reviews & Ratings for
"Faith" More at IMDbPro »"Shinui" (original title)

Write review
Filter: Hide Spoilers:
Index 9 reviews in total 

8 out of 8 people found the following review useful:

A nice balance of action, drama, and politics

8/10
Author: FilmExpertWannabe from United States
10 September 2012

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Afflicted by delays and casting issues, Faith is one of the higher profile series to come out of South Korea in 2012. Hot off the well received City Hunter series last year, Lee Min Ho has done an excellent job and appears in a role unique to what some of us have seen him do before.

Since this IMDb page doesn't list a brief summary, here's a quick breakdown: Choi Young (Lee Min Ho) is a top royal body guard in the 1300s. When the queen suffers a severe injury requiring medical attention beyond their capabilities, it is suggested that they use a mysterious portal-type formation to go to Heaven and find God's doctor. Lee Min Ho is the man for the job. Unknown to these people, the portal actually leads to the future (2012) and the doctor he selected is not God's doctor at all, but rather Yoo Eun-soo (Kim Hee-Sun). With her back in the 1300s, where will the story go?

It is well acted, well shot, although there are a few pockets of episodes they might have missed. On the whole, I could see them tightening the series up and bringing it down to, say, 20 episodes and keep the emotion, action, and character development while leaving behind a little of the excess. In spite of some pacing issues, the series finishes well and is very much worth seeing.

Was the above review useful to you?

6 out of 6 people found the following review useful:

Director's Beautiful Touch - an explanation of why there is no embrace in the last scene

10/10
Author: Geneva Ashdene
22 November 2014

Dear Friends,

If you mention my article below, please credit me as the writer. Please do not copy and/or transpose and upload in any form my article without my permission. Many thanks!

In memory of Director Kim Jong Hak (4th anniversary, 2016)

The place where the tree is located is small. The way the director filmed the scene with the two (Choi Yong and Eun Soo) apart gave it distance and made the place seemed bigger, thus the cinematography became epic. Even though they were not that far away from each other, we would feel that the distance was large. In the scene that we keep playing over and over in our minds, the more we want them to come together, and the fact that they just stand there staring at each other makes the distance between them feel like the distance is even greater and the place larger and thus the scene becomes epic.

They are far apart...

Many steps, many years, many lifetimes apart…

The third element – a genius at work

The third element is the tension of expectation that something is going to happen, that which we know is going to happen and that we longed for but is actually not there - yet. We know the next frame is what we expect to happen. From an art history studies point of view, this is very Boroque. The third element in the Boroque painting style is the missing part that is the next moment, that which is not in the painting but in the viewer's mind as an expectation and is often dramatically different from what is visible in the painting. This adds depth to the scene as there is a third element in the two dimensional plane. The expectation of a dramatic change to the whole scene makes the scene more emotionally moving and it leaves the viewer a more lasting impression. It evokes a lot more emotion from the viewer because the next moment is elusive. It keeps you thinking and longing for the next moment that follows the scene you are viewing.

They will come together. The third element...

And because of this third element and the epic scenery, the film reel in our minds will play it over and over - that they were apart but would come together in a very epic and dramatic way. They were finally close, but apart, or they were apart, but would come together. The last scene makes the viewer feel what Choi Yong and Eun Soo had felt in all those lifetimes, years and steps apart.

I appreciate what the director had done for the ending. Anyone can do a kissing and hugging scene for the ending. But the director did something extraordinary - powerful, epic, emotional and lasting. He made us feel the frustration, the surprise, the longing, the faithfulness, the patience, the sadness, the joy, the gratefulness, and much more - all the emotions that went through the two characters - all in but one scene. How else would we feel everything that the two characters feel? How else could we have such strong feelings and a long-lasting memory of the story that the director told? That is an unexpected and ingenious way to sum it up and end it for in this way, with the third element at work, it never ends.

And this never-ending and looping element is also another theme of the story - how many lifetimes of these two diverged and converged? Based on faith and love?

Have you wondered why to this day you still talk about the story, still have strong feelings for the character and still want to view it over and over again? This is why. The third element at work.

That was a genius at work. That was beautiful. That was his touch which touched my heart. And I discovered this at the tree.

Was the above review useful to you?

6 out of 6 people found the following review useful:

The search for the truth is not for the faint hearted. Vincent D'Onofrio

9/10
Author: utopianwizard-22-274383 from Los Angeles
11 December 2013

I have come to appreciate the emotions good Korean actors can emit in a scene. This series is so very well done, I'm hoping it continues. I found it on Netflix {I'm not trying to sell Netflix), and was thinking it probably is an adolescent series. It isn't that simple. The subtitles are obviously done by an inexperienced translator, which sometimes is irritating, but also can be very interesting for a native English-speaker. The language the translator uses is very contemporary, using terms like "punk" etc., but I imagined from the get-go that there was a meeting of the staff to decide if using contemporary language would add or detract from the series. I believe they made the right decision in one sense because viewers (and most likely they are as adolescent viewers as me, it's true} can get caught up in the exchanges between actors, Min-ho Lee {Choi Young, the general, and Hee-seon Kim {Yoo Eun-Soo, the good doctor} as the love tension between them evolves, and there are some hilarious moments with these two as they struggle to hide their growing love from both themselves and one another. But I'm so curious about the archaic language that I might be missing because that language has always reflected the complex and brutal formality of the ancient cultures of the Asian societies. It's so very Shakespearean in his characters' consistent struggle to find one another in a feudal age where honor is everything to a male. But even with their use of contemporary Korean, I realize at this very instant, the power lies in a mixture of archaic expression with the contemporary "kids", "punks", etc., showing the exquisite complexity that one simple word can carry in the politics of the mind in a chess game or Go. As the first reviewer has said, it is very obvious the director tightens the series very sublimely as it progresses, moving nicely to much deeper themes than simply a love story or drama. I've been privileged to have seen some of the top actors of the series in other major films, and the impetus created by the story-lines and stylistic methodology compels the viewer to keep watching for the next episodes.

I'm amazed by the Korean theatre. It is very well established, and this series makes that obvious. The result makes for scholarly study of such a phenomenon as well as an enjoyable and even emotional/spiritual experience even if it is adolescent at its core. Perhaps I'm simply a 65 year old baby looking at my past remembering in my own melancholy some of the finer things in my life. As a former film maker though, I cannot help but want this show to continue to evolve. So does it matter that perhaps it is a little adolescent while covering a sublime set of universal themes? there's so much more I would like to say here, but I guess I will have to write an essay about it. No room here.

Was the above review useful to you?

6 out of 7 people found the following review useful:

Awesome!!

9/10
Author: pratikshya-mishra72 from Bhubaneswar, India
17 May 2014

This is a drama in which the writer has deftly used the history, mythology, and Korean legends along with a bit of fantasy to weave a beautiful and powerful story.

A Tale of Love across Time: The love story of Choi Young and Eun Soo is sure to tug the viewers' heartstrings. This love across centuries, love defying time, will be a hit among romantics. From making her learn the way of their world to protecting her from innumerable death traps, Choi Young is falling for Eun Soo, even though he knows he has to keep his promise to her, to help her return to her world. And Eun Soo changes her perspective from seeing him as her kidnapper to the only one she can trust in the unknown world of past, and to be with him becomes a habit she's reluctant to change. The gradual falling in love is beautifully portrayed in this period drama, while the question 'will she return?' refuses to cease anyone's mind.

Was the above review useful to you?

2 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

Good Movie

9/10
Author: nodatatoshare from Washington, DC
18 September 2014

This is a good series. I wanted most of episodes 1 -12 diligently then skipped to episode 18 or 19 and even then began following the plot but skipping along. Instead of providing high analysis I will just say, I wish the main characters embraced at the very end. To be correct I would have given it an 8.9 out of 10. Will definitely find other Korean movies to watch in future. Did not have the heart or time to thoroughly watch episodes 13-17 as it was more of the back and forth plotting and endangerment stuff. Definitely opened my eyes to some of Korean culture and historical drama. There are no outright make-out scenes, but some of the replay views of the past help to continually reinforce the bond the main characters have built up. I also wish more US/Western or UK stories were told from this perspective- not exclusively first person, always sticking the audience hearing in first person what the main character or characters are feeling.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

For everyone who thinks the ending of Faith wasn't self-explanatory or wants answers for

9/10
Author: Alexandra Steinberg from Germany
21 August 2016

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

the questions like "What's with the tree?", "Why was Tansongwan so angry about the doctor saving someone's life, she shouldn't save?", "Why did he get the order to kill her from his great-great- grandfather?" or "What was on the destroyed last pages of her diary?".

Please, visit the Faith page on Asian Wiki, here:

http://asianwiki.com/index.php? title=Faith_(Korean_Drama)&forcepurge=1#comment-1148452

and read the comment of Alexandra.

This is a wonderful drama and it needs a wonderful ending. A romantic and solving one. Enjoy!

Was the above review useful to you?

4 out of 7 people found the following review useful:

Great fun

7/10
Author: drarthurwells from United States
12 February 2014

Fassbinder's Berlin Alexanderplatz (1980) was a long movie - over 15 hours long. The Thornbirds, Roots and other early TV mini-series were long movies broken into consecutive episodes. I love a mini-series as a melodrama that tells a story in the long movie format, as opposed to those that tell different stories in the same setting (like Grey's Anatomy, Mad Men and to a lesser extent Damages, Breaking Bad, and Revenge that change the story at times while keeping to a general story). In this regard, I have discovered some gems in the South Korean TV mini-series of recent years.

The basic melodrama is the oft repeated formula: Boy meets Girl, Boy loses Girl, Boy gets Girl Back. This me recur in the same story. Human relations can be complex even if only the boy and girl are involved, but this complexity increases as more people are involved. If personality dynamics are properly depicted in a valid manner, and if the production is skillful, powerful emotions can be evoked in the viewer. In this way we can live many lifetimes through movies, in our one lifetime - greatly enriching our incarnate experience. These South Korean productions (seen on Netflix streaming) are first class with excellent production and direction, some terrific casting and acting (particularly from some of the females who give some matchless world class performances), brilliant musical accompaniment, and staging. What makes these so good is the way they skillfully evoke deep emotion in the viewer. South Korean movie making is superb - world class.

However, the following caveats must be considered by the USA viewer. They are subtitled and some people hate this. The South Korean cultural norms, values and sanctions may sometimes seems silly or old fashioned to the USA viewer. The families are close knit and decisions by an individual may be subject to family approval. Social distance is maintained where formal speech is used, and personal speech forms are reserved for close friends or family. There is a strong work ethic and community cooperation/unity - sometimes reminiscence of a old Frank Capra film.

Most importantly, in order for the sometimes complicated sub-plots to work, people fail to communicate with each other as might be expected, keeping many in the dark as to what others are doing, and this leads to misunderstandings and error judgments of some people, that sometimes seem to be unlikely by USA cultural standards. The viewer may wonder at times why good but trusting people are so easily manipulated and deceived by bad and selfish people, but con artists do often succeed (just look at politicians for example). However this poetic license of improbability is needed to develop the story - just accept it as occurring even though unlikely at times. Taking these factors into account Will help you become involved and emotionally engrossed. It was hard t for me to quit watching at times so I binged watched.

I would rank these as follows but tastes differ and your rankings might not agree: 1 - 4 (hard to say which is best)

Shining Inheritance

When a Man Loves

That Winter, The Wind Blows

Secret garden

5. Five Fingers

6. The Scent of a Woman

7. The Great Queen Seondeok

8. A Hundred Years Inheritance

9. Lie To me

10. Roof Top Prince

11. Dr. Jin

12. The Great Doctor

Like Rooftop Prince and Dr. Jin, The Great Doctor has a fantasy premise - a warrior General experiences time travel from the past to the present day and then back to his past. Then a political struggle and suspenseful turns is a background for romantic melodrama, with some fantasy aspects thrown into the mix. Time travel is rare but has been reported by reputable people. See J. Randles book, Time Slips, for more on this. Accept the fantasy and enjoy the fun.

Was the above review useful to you?

What I have figured out after watching this series 5 times!

10/10
Author: marina0481 from Greece
15 February 2017

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

SPOILER ALERT!!! After watching this series for about 5 times! (Yeah I know! I am a Kdrama fan :P ) I have come to this conclusion: In her first life Eun Soo went back in time where Choi Young was killed by the ambush set by he evil uncle of the king, so she wrote down the whole incident in her diary and went through the portal that send her further back in time.

In her second life Eun Soo went back in time where after finding the previous pages of the diary saved Choi Young from the ambush that had killed him the previous time only for him to be driven crazy with guilt after the queen was killed by the evil uncle of the king when he abducted her, she then had to leave him and traveled further back in time where she also wrote this incident to her diary.

In her third life Eun Soo went back in time, saved Choi Young from the ambush of the evil uncle, saved the queen from the evil uncle and then went further back in time, because she was ambushed, only to be reunited with our sweetheart Choi Young in the heartfelt end of the series.

We can only assume that the fourth time she would have written what had happened the third time and avoided the crazy heaven-citizen- wannabe.

I feel like the whole concept of this series is that everyone's lives had already been, and we have to live again, and again the same life for eternity, and that is why Eun Soo has written so many "BE CAREFUL! DANGER" pages about Choi Young because of the fact that every time she "lives" she adds a little something to that diary.

I would have loved to see my sweetheart Lee Goon Ji in the main role, had it not been for his military service, but I found Lee Min Ho just as gorgeous. That's all from me! I hope I was somewhat understandable! :)

Was the above review useful to you?

What I have figured out after watching this series 5 times!

10/10
Author: marina0481 from Greece
12 February 2017

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

SPOILER ALERT!!! After watching this series for about 5 times! (Yeah I know! I am a Kdrama fan :P ) I have come to this conclusion: In her first life Eun Soo went back in time where Choi Young was killed by the ambush set by he evil uncle of the king, so she wrote down the whole incident in her diary and went through the portal that send her further back in time.

In her second life Eun Soo went back in time where after finding the previous pages of the diary saved Choi Young from the ambush that had killed him the previous time only for him to be driven crazy with guilt after the queen was killed by the evil uncle of the king when he abducted her, she then had to leave him and traveled further back in time where she also wrote this incident to her diary.

In her third life Eun Soo went back in time, saved Choi Young from the ambush of the evil uncle, saved the queen from the evil uncle and then went further back in time, because she was ambushed, only to be reunited with our sweetheart Choi Young in the heartfelt end of the series.

We can only assume that the fourth time she would have written what had happened the third time and avoided the crazy heaven-citizen- wannabe.

I feel like the whole concept of this series is that everyone's lives had already been, and we have to live again, and again the same life for eternity, and that is why Eun Soo has written so many "BE CAREFUL! DANGER" pages about Choi Young because of the fact that every time she "lives" she adds a little something to that diary.

I would have loved to see my sweetheart Lee Goon Ji in the main role, had it not been for his military service, but I found Lee Min Ho just as gorgeous. That's all from me! I hope I was somewhat understandable! :)

Was the above review useful to you?


Add another review


Related Links

Plot summary Ratings Awards
Official site Plot keywords Main details
Your user reviews Your vote history