Space Station 76 (2014) - News Poster

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George Takei Thanks Gay and Lesbian Entertainment Critics Association Photos

In an intimate finish to the busy 2014/15 awards season, celebrities, industry executives and L.A.-area members of the Gay and Lesbian Entertainment Critics Association (Galeca) gathered Sunday at Hollywood’s The Pikey Café and Bar to pop champagne, mingle and toast the group’s annual Dorian Award picks for the finest in TV and film (revealed Jan. 20).From the release:In the mix: Transparent star Melora Hardin, Robert Michael Morris of The Comeback, actor and Lgbt-rights activist Wilson Cruz, ABC Studios honcho Patrick Moran, TV writer/creator Jordan Budde (Mistresses, The Client List), Space Station 76 producers Bob Hayes and Jim Burba, author Anna […]
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

‘The Loft’ Review: James Marsden and Wentworth Miller Thriller as Exciting as an Escrow Hearing

  • The Wrap
‘The Loft’ Review: James Marsden and Wentworth Miller Thriller as Exciting as an Escrow Hearing
If you were to unleash a naughty, baroque prankster like Brian De Palma onto the grimly joyless adulterous goings-on of “The Loft,” you might wind up with the kind of delicious trash this thriller so wants to be. Filmed in blue-steel noir-in-color and featuring performances in which everyone’s either mumbling or screaming, however, this silly chamber piece about sex and murder elicits only yawns, interrupted by the occasional unintentional giggle.

A remake of a 2008 Belgian film, this movie does occasionally have that awkward feel of something that’s been translated from one language into Esperanto and then finally into English.
See full article at The Wrap »

'Guardians,' 'Whiplash,' and… '12 Years a Slave' (throwback!) among Casting Society’s nominees

  • Hitfix
'Guardians,' 'Whiplash,' and… '12 Years a Slave' (throwback!) among Casting Society’s nominees
Because the Casting Society of America shifted the date of its Artios Awards, this year’s nominees include films released theatrically from July 1, 2013 to Dec. 31, 2014, paving the way for last year’s Best Picture winner to nuzzle its way into contention along with 2014 hopefuls like "Birdman," "Boyhood," and "Selma." With categories ranging from Big Budget Drama to Low Budget Comedy, nearly every film that one expects to make the cut made the cut. And then some. The Csa’s nominees put "Guardians of the Galaxy" side by side with "Wolf of Wall Street," "Whiplash" with "Inside Llewyn Davis," and Disney’s "Planes" with "Frozen." If you were dreaming of a re-evaluation of "We’re the Millers," your time is now. 2015’s bicoastal Artios Awards will be hosted by Patton Oswalt (Los Angeles) and Michael Urie (New York City). The evening will also honor two-time Academy Award®-nominee Richard Linklater ("Boyhood
See full article at Hitfix »

Casting Society Nominations Pit ‘Gone Girl,’ ‘Selma’ and ‘Foxcatcher’ Against 2013’s Big Movies

  • The Wrap
Casting Society Nominations Pit ‘Gone Girl,’ ‘Selma’ and ‘Foxcatcher’ Against 2013’s Big Movies
The Casting Society of America has super-sized its Artios Awards feature film nominations this year, honoring 42 different films and putting some of 2014’s top contenders in categories where they’ll compete against 2013’s awards movies.

For its 30th annual ceremony, the awards for casting directors have moved from their usual fall slot to a late-January date that placed them in the middle of awards season. To accommodate the new date, this year’s eligibility period spanned 18 months instead of a single year, encompassing films released in the second half of 2013 and all of 2014.

See photos: The 17 Breakout Stars of 2014:
See full article at The Wrap »

Casting Society Unveils Artios Film Nominees

  • Deadline
Casting Society Unveils Artios Film Nominees
Guardians Of The Galaxy, Into The Woods, Big Eyes and Gone Girl are among the feature film nominees announced today for the Casting Society of America’s 30th Annual Artios Awards. Winners for film, television, theater and new media categories will be announced January 22 at simultaneous award ceremonies at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles and 42West Cabaret & Lounge in New York City. Patton Oswalt will host in La and Michael Urie in New York.

Csa also will honor Richard Linklater (Boyhood) with the Career Achievement Award, Rob Marshall (Into The Woods) with the New York Apple Award and casting director Ellen Lewis with the Hoyt Bowers Award. Due to the Artios Awards date change this year (from November to January), the eligibility period for film projects was expanded for this award ceremony only, to include films released theatrically from July 1, 2013 through December 31, 2014. Here’s the complete list of
See full article at Deadline »

TheWrap’s Film Critics Pick 10 Best Movies of 2014

  • The Wrap
TheWrap’s Film Critics Pick 10 Best Movies of 2014
When is a gimmick not a gimmick? When it underscores strong storytelling rather than distracting from a bad script. It was easy to think of the selling points behind “Boyhood” (actors age in real time during a production spread out over a dozen years); “Locke” (movie centered around one man in a car making phone calls) or “Birdman” (camera and editing tricks employed to make the film look like one continuous take) as mere hoopla – and then we saw the movies.

Not all of the year’s best films employed such razzle-dazzle, but it was heartening to know that in
See full article at The Wrap »

The 14 Best Sci-Fi and Fantasy Movies of 2014

Thanks to the continued popularity of superhero movies and Ya literature adaptations and now the reignited interest in monsters, the joined genres of science fiction and fantasy are giving us what seems to be more releases than ever. It helps that computer effects are cheaper and easier for the benefit of indies and that so many makers of shorts see simple yet impressively visualized stories involving robots, dystopias and alien invasions as the perfect calling card for Hollywood. The plethora of works dealing with the unreal and as yet impossible means that while last year a Hobbit movie made the cut, this year the final chapter did not. It means that a new sci-fi film from Terry Gilliam, my longtime favorite director, also fell below our limit of the top 14. And it also means there was just too much out there for me to get around to. Apologies to Space Station 76, The Hunger Games
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

The Stack: Canfield Talks Space Station 76, Animated Rick And Morty, Vintage William Castle, And More

Welcome back to The Stack. This is the final episode before I kick off our Holiday Gift Guide this Tuesday November 25. This is also the beginning of a new, shorter format. But The Stack is still packed with home entertainment goodness. A favorite release is Space Station 76 (2014), directed by Jack Plotnick, whom you might remember from Rubber (2010) and Wrong (2012). Olive Films releases Fedora (1978), which many consider to be Billy Wilder's late career followup to Sunset Boulevard (1950). I also take a look at one of their back catalog titles, the nearly forgotten William Castle science fiction spy thriller Project X (1968). Lastly and quite excitedly, I tease the gift guide coverage by revealing one of this year's great TV Blu-ray box...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Stretch | Review

To Live and Drive in La: Carnahan’s Trip into Hollyweird

In an unprecedented and surprisingly brusque move, Universal chose to dump Joe Carnahan’s latest film, Stretch into a sole VOD platform release, bypassing a theatrical run completely. While this signifies the studio’s lack of confidence in the title, it’s most likely a herald of things to come for filmmakers working within the system. The rule of thumb in the film industry used to be that you’re only as good as your last picture, but Carnahan received some of the best notices of his directorial career with 2012’s The Grey—it no longer seems to matter just how well your last picture performed. In defense of the eclectic director’s tastes, his latest is a bizarre romp through Tinseltown that never adheres to a particular mold, making it a rather tough sell but pleasantly offbeat feature,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

As the Indie Biz Booms, Budding Filmmakers Need to Stand Out

As the Indie Biz Booms, Budding Filmmakers Need to Stand Out
One of my guilty pleasures is to read the dozens of mini reviews of new indie films that run Fridays in the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times. I admire their commitment to support the indie scene with reviews, but it’s daunting (if darkly amusing) that nearly all of them are pans.

Hence, the film titled “Plastic” is dismissed as “a cheap knockoff.” On “The Scribbler,” the critic says “someone should have scribbled a better script.” The review of “Space Station 76” advises that cast and crew “are lost in space.” One exasperated critic for the New York Times scolds in his review of “Swim Little Fish Swim” that too many young filmmakers “have a camera or tape recorder but little insight to put into it.” “Not Cool” draws the unkindest cut of all: “No one involved with it should ever be allowed to work in the movies again.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

DVD Obscura: The New Indie and International Movies You Need to Watch

New Indie: Space Station 76 (Sony Pictures Home Entertainment) sets up audiences to expect something broad and spoofy, particularly with its spot-on re-creation of the future as envisioned by 1970s sci-fi. But the movie has more on its plate than wackiness: once you get past the cigarettes, hairspray and ceramic owl cookie jars, you find that these sets are populated with melancholy characters and messed-up relationships that are meant to be taken seriously. Not for nothing did one critic call this a mix of Space: 1999 and The Ice Storm. The arrival of Jessica (Liv Tyler) aboard the space station causes ripples amongst its unhappy crew: hard-drinking Captain Glenn (Patrick Wilson) resents her presence while stewing over past regret, but Ted (Matt Bomer) sees Jessica as a kindred...

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See full article at Movies.com »

'Transformers: Age of Extinction', 'Chef' & '24: Live Another Day' on DVD & Blu-ray Today

Chef One of the best films of 2014 so far and a movie that, while I wish you had seen it in theaters (that is if you didn't), will play perfectly at home. I really hope all of you get a chance to check out Jon Favreau's Chef, not because it's Amazing, but because it's just a good, sweet, funny film. Here's my review if you're interested.

Transformers: Age of Extinction Now if you haven't seen Transformers: Age of Extinction, woe be to those of you that watch it for the first time at home. This is a film meant to be seen on a giant screen as it pummels you into submission. At home I just don't see the point. Here's my theatrical review and then an article I wrote examining Michael Bay and the movie if you're interested.

24: Live Another Day I've seen about two or three
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

‘Space Station 76′ Is Sci-Fi Comedy from the Future and the Best New DVD Release of the Week

Welcome back to This Week In Discs! If you see something you like, click on the title to buy it from Amazon. Space Station 76 The Omega 76 is a space station expecting two new visitors. First up is a new co-captain (Liv Tyler) who immediately sets the current captain (Patrick Wilson) on edge and disrupts the crew’s flow, but she’s still far less threatening than the second visitor. Because it’s an asteroid! Or meteor. Details aren’t important, but what is important is how the crew reacts to the impending danger coinciding with a bevy of personal dramas among them. Actor Jack Plotnick directs this surprisingly dark space-set comedy and delivers a lot of laughs along the way. The gags are both visual — this is sci-fi as envisioned in the ’70s meaning the tech is old fashioned and quaint — and dialogue/delivery-based as the script serves up plenty of great lines and humorous conflicts
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

September 30th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Leprechaun, Killer Fish

  • DailyDead
For the final week of September, we’ll be seeing a handful of indie genre titles coming our way to DVD and Blu-ray, as well as several cult classics, including the original Leprechaun films, finally making their high-def debut on Tuesday.

In terms of new indie movies to keep an eye out for, Grow-up Tony Phillips, the latest from up-and-coming Austin filmmaker Emily Hagins (My Sucky Teen Romance), is being released as well as American Muscle, The Paranormal Diaries, Grave Halloween and the pregnancy-themed horror flick Delivery: The Beast Within. For those of you horror fans looking for something a bit more ‘seasoned’, both Krull and Killer Fish are getting their Blu-ray treatment this week and should make for excellent additions to your home entertainment collection.

Spotlight Titles:

Grow-up Tony Phillips (Anderson Digital, DVD)

Who doesn’t love Halloween? All of Tony Phillips’ high school friends do, apparently. It’s
See full article at DailyDead »

Patrick Wilson, Matthew Fox Join Kurt Russell Western ‘Bone Tomahawk’

  • Deadline
Patrick Wilson, Matthew Fox Join Kurt Russell Western ‘Bone Tomahawk’
Patrick Wilson and Matthew Fox have joined Kurt Russell and Richard Jenkins in Caliber Media’s Bone Tomahawk, the brutal tale of four men attempting to rescue a group of captives from a band of cannibals who live on the edge of civilization. Wilson will play Arthur O’Dwyer, a thoughtful cowboy whose rise to the foreman position of a cattle outfit is interrupted by an unfortunate accident that reshapes his life in unforeseen ways. Fox has the role of John Brooder, an eloquent gentleman whose whose dark inclinations have put him and his polished weapons at the very edge of the western frontier.

Wilson’s coming off the recent horror hits Insidious: Chapter 2 and The Conjuring. He departed the cast of Marvel’s Ant-Man this summer and is currently in theaters in the sci-fi comedy Space Station 76. Fox starred in Peter Webber’s WWII drama Emperor and Summit’s Alex Cross,
See full article at Deadline »

Triple the Patrick

Manuel here to check in with “The Prom King” himself whose latest passion project films have been making news lately:

First up and still looking for distribution is Stretch, the Joe Carnahan film he shot in just under twenty-three days with Chris Pine, which is drumming up interest by releasing new images and new clips. Carnahan, who shot the film for Universal, has found himself needing to find alternate distribution for it, and from the plot description (and the weirdly fascinating pics released) one can see why: “The under-$5 million pic follows a chauffeur who’s deep in debt to a bookie. In the hope of scoring a big tip, he picks up a risky job ferrying around a mysterious billionaire (Pine) who wants to sell his book of criminal contacts. The driver tries his best to fulfill all of his client’s requests, but the night takes ever stranger turns,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Liv Tyler Talks Space Station 76, Working With Director Jack Plotnick, Shooting The Leftovers, and Her Hopes for Season 2

From co-writer/director Jack Plotnick, the quirky indie film Space Station 76 tells the story of Omega 76's new assistant captain Jessica Marlowe (Liv Tyler), whose arrival inadvertently creates tension among everyone at the space station. Jessica’s intelligence and unwavering focus on her work confuses the Captain (Patrick Wilson) and upsets Misty (Marisa Coughlan), especially as it becomes clear that her husband Ted (Matt Bomer) and daughter Sunshine (Kylie Rogers) are finding themselves drawn to Jessica. During this exclusive phone interview with Collider, actress Liv Tyler talked about how she came to be a part of Space Station 76, why she wanted to work with Jack Plotnick, the visual style of the film, how her character ends up at this space station and in the position that she’s in, how much she adores Matt Bomer, shooting at a former porn studio, and being able to add to her
See full article at Collider.com »

Liv Tyler talks 'Space Station 76,' and how 'The Leftovers' scratches an old 'Lotr' itch

  • Hitfix
Liv Tyler talks 'Space Station 76,' and how 'The Leftovers' scratches an old 'Lotr' itch
In two of her most recent roles, Liv Tyler went to outerspace, and then she was very much trapped on planet Earth. The actress and model took a break in the first decade of the 2000s, but found herself tapped back into film when actor Jack Plotnick decided to direct his first feature “Space Station 76,” a darkly comedic satire of sci-fi movies from the 1970s that has the crew aboard questioning gender, sexual orientation, habits and morals. Plotnick spoke a language that resonated with Tyler, which put her in a role opposite of Patrick Wilson, Matt Bomer, Marisa Coughlan and more in a spaceship with a tiny budget. Then she said “yes” to HBO's “The Leftovers,” which Tyler described as a confluence of all her dream job descriptions. It was regular work, that kept her in New York and close to her son Milo, with a character (Meg) that was a little bit “off.
See full article at Hitfix »

Space Station 76 | Review

Earth Below Us: Plotnick’s Debut a Sweet Space Soap Opera

Those familiar with the comedic genius of Jack Plotnick should be thrilled to see his directorial debut, Space Station 76, based on a stage play he co-wrote. Bearing his particular brand of subversive, offbeat humor, it’s a space set soap opera made as if it were in the 1970’s and meant as an homage to those classic films from the time period that inventively attempted to visually prophesize the space age. Regularly featured in the films of Quentin Dupieux and television series, ‘Reno 911,” Plotnick’s perhaps best known for the sorely underrated spoof, Girls Will Be Girls, so many may be surprised at the sometimes melancholy tone underlying this film’s more capricious moments. More of a space age melodrama reflecting nostalgia for a bygone era of storytelling in its mixture of vintage and modern tone, it’s as sweet,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »
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