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Quote of the Day: Sarah Polley on How Directing Made Her More Aware of Hollywood’s Sexism

16 October 2017 9:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Polley on the set of “Take This Waltz”: Magnolia Pictures/IMDb

Actress, writer, and director Sarah Polley is sharing her story about Harvey Weinstein. The producer propositioned Polley, the “Stories We Tell” helmer writes in an opinion piece for the New York Times. Weinstein suggested that a “very close relationship” with him would mean more acting work for her. “I indicated that he was wasting his time,” Polley recalls. “I just didn’t care that much about an acting career. I loved acting, still do, but I knew, after 14 years of working professionally, that it wasn’t worth it to me, and the reasons were not unconnected to the tone of that meeting.”

As she hints, that encounter with Weinstein was not the first time Polley came up against Hollywood’s misogyny. But she didn’t realize how much show business normalizes predatory behavior until she started directing her own projects.

“Shortly afterward, I started writing and directing short films. I had no idea, until then, how little respect I had been shown as an actor. Now there were no assistant directors trying to cajole me into sitting on their laps, no groups of men standing around to assess how I looked in a particular piece of clothing,” Polley details. “I could decide what I felt was important to say, how to film a woman, without her sexuality being a central focus without context.”

After having a positive, collaborative experience with Julie Christie on the set of her directorial debut, “Away From Her,” Polley decided to return to acting. But while she was more confident in her abilities and voice, Hollywood’s treatment of women was the same as ever. “This industry doesn’t tend to attract the most gentle and principled among us,” Polley says of the alpha male directors and producers she’s worked with. “I had two experiences in the same year in which I went into a film as an actor with an open heart and was humiliated, violated, dismissed and then, in one instance, called overly sensitive when I complained.”

“For a long time, I felt that it wasn’t worth it to me to open my heart and make myself so vulnerable in an industry that makes its disdain for women evident everywhere I turn,” Polley emphasizes. Her ambivalence about the craft is understandable: female actors endure an unbelievable amount of shitty treatment and face a “damned if you do, damned if you don’t” situation when they consider speaking out.

Hopefully, as Polley mentions in her piece, the Weinstein case will mark a turning point. “I hope that the ways in which women are degraded, both obvious and subtle, begin to seem like a thing of the past,” she writes. Amen.

Polley received an Oscar nomination in 2008 for writing “Away From Her,” which stars Christie as a woman living with Alzheimer’s. Polley’s other directorial credits include the infidelity drama “Take This Waltz” and “Stories We Tell,” a documentary about her own family and parentage. She also penned the upcoming Netflix miniseries “Alias Grace,” an adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s novel.

Quote of the Day: Sarah Polley on How Directing Made Her More Aware of Hollywood’s Sexism was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

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Sarah Polley Says Harvey Weinstein Is ‘One Festering Pustule in a Diseased Industry’

14 October 2017 1:56 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Sarah Polley has her own Harvey Weinstein story, and though the “Away From Her” and “Stories We Tell” director calls it “comparatively tame” it’s troubling all the same — especially because, as the actor-turned-filmmaker writes in the New York Times, the disgraced executive “was just one festering pustule in a diseased industry.” The incident itself is said to have taken place after a photo shoot for “Guinevere,” a film in which Polley starred that Miramax (then run by Weinstein) released in 1999.

Read More:The Academy Expels Harvey Weinstein, Breaking with Tradition

Polley alleges that, during a meeting that two others were present for, Weinstein told her that the two of them having a “close relationship” would be beneficial for her career. “‘That’s how it works,’ I remember him telling me. The implication wasn’t subtle.” She says she rejected his unsubtle proposition in part because she “wasn’t very ambitious or interested in acting. »

- Michael Nordine

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‘Monogamish’ Review: The Polyamorous Revolution in One Entertaining and Stylish Documentary

14 October 2017 7:44 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“Being in love is like being high,” says Roberta Haze, a California-based costume designer sporting purple hair and layers of hoop wearings. “That has to transform into love, because that stays. Like snorting coke, it’s not a state that you can live in all the time.” Roberta is neighbors with the filmmaker Tao Ruspoli, who turned a painful divorce from his wife of ten years into a fascinating and stylish new documentary, “Monogamish.”

The title comes from a term coined by beloved sex and relationships columnist Dan Savage, who appears in the film as a talking head, but also as a benevolent guide for Ruspoli’s infectious curiosity.

Through his “Savage Love” column and podcast, which he has been writing since 1991 in Seattle paper The Stranger, Savage has become the most vocal and visible proponent of non-monogamy and non-traditional relationships in the country. Savage, along with other interview subjects Esther Perel, »

- Jude Dry

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New York Film Festival: 13 Films We Can’t Wait to See This Year, From ‘Lady Bird’ to ‘Last Flag Flying’

27 September 2017 12:20 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The New York Film Festival kicks off later this week, sending us straight into the second half of a very busy fall festival season. In preparation for the festival, we’ve pinpointed its most exciting offerings, from never-before-seen narratives to insightful new documentaries, and plenty of previously-screened features looking to capitalize on strong word of mouth coming out of fellow tests like Venice, Telluride, and Toronto. In short, there’s plenty to experience in the coming weeks, so consider this your roadmap to the best of the fest.

Read More:Bryan Cranston Enters Oscar Race with New York Film Festival Opener ‘Last Flag Flying

Ahead, 13 essential titles — from buzzy world premieres to highlights from the 2017 circuit— that we can’t wait to see at this year’s New York Film Festival.

Arthur Miller: Writer

Documentaries about family members are always a dubious proposition. Some can also come across as overindulgent exercises, »

- Kate Erbland, Eric Kohn, Anne Thompson, David Ehrlich, Chris O'Falt, Jude Dry, Michael Nordine and Steve Greene

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Fall 2017 TV Preview: New Shows By and About Women to Check Out

20 September 2017 10:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Star Trek: Discovery”: CBS Entertainment

We are officially in the throes of the fall television season — and the next couple of months will be an especially good time for women on the small screen. From now until Thanksgiving there will be a bunch of new female-driven projects to check out across broadcast, cable, and streaming platforms.

This Sunday marks premiere of the much-anticipated “Star Trek: Discovery,” a feminist prequel to the Kirk and Spock-led 1966 original. The CBS All Access series revolves around two women of color: Starfleet officer Michael Burnham (Sonequa Martin-Green) and Captain Georgiou (Michelle Yeoh).

October will see the bows of several women-created series. Among them are two ABC shows: Tassie Cameron’s child abduction drama “Ten Days in the Valley” starring Kyra Sedgwick, and Michele Fazekas and Tara Butters’ “Kevin (Probably) Saves the World,” a dramedy about depression, faith, and life. The CW will also debut the reboot of “Dynasty,” co-created by Stephanie Savage and Sallie Patrick. The update of the classic soap will focus on the not-too-friendly relationship between a woman and her same-aged stepmother-to-be.

Three women-hosted talk shows will also kick off in October. Sarah Silverman and Robin Thede will take on politics and current events in Hulu’s “I Love You, America” and Bet’s “The Rundown,” respectively. And Amy Sedaris will instruct us on cooking and crafting via her manic, twisted worldview in the truTV series “At Home With Amy Sedaris.”

The second Margaret Atwood TV adaptation this year, “Alias Grace,” will hit Netflix in early November. Written by Sarah Polley and directed by Mary Harron, the Canada-set miniseries follows Grace Marks, an Irish immigrant accused and convicted of murder. For lighter November fare, turn to “Smilf” and “She’s Gotta Have It,” both of which are comedies inspired by films. Frankie Shaw’s “Smilf” is about a young mother trying to find romantic and professional fulfillment, which is extra difficult since she is also raising a child. “She’s Gotta Have It,” meanwhile, sees an independent Brooklyn artist juggle relationships with three different men.

Here are just some of the new series and television projects from and about women premiering this fall.

Star Trek: Discovery” (Premieres September 24 on CBS All Access)

Star Trek: Discovery”: CBS All Access

What it’s about: Set a decade before Kirk and Spock’s adventures on the Enterprise, “Star Trek: Discovery” centers on a female Starfleet officer named Michael (Sonequa Martin-Green), her captain (Michelle Yeoh), and the rest of the crew of the USS Discovery as they encounter new worlds and beings as they travel throughout space.

Why we’re excited: While the number of black and Asian female characters on TV is slowly increasing, it’s still uncommon for a series to feature more than one woman of color, let alone two female lead characters of color. So it seems “Discovery” will be a trailblazer in that regard. Also, per an early trailer, it appears that the mentor-protege relationship between Captain Georgiou and Michael will be a main focus. We think a feminist, diverse “Star Trek” is the sci-fi project 2017 needs right now.

The Magic School Bus Rides Again” (Premieres September 29 on Netflix)

The Magic School Bus Rides Again

What it’s about: Kate McKinnon will lead this reboot of the classic kids’ series. Ms. Fiona Frizzle — younger sister of Lily Tomlin’s original Ms. Valerie Frizzle — takes the students of Walkerville Elementary on scientific, adventure-filled field trips with the help of a very special school bus.

Why we’re excited: If “Hidden Figures” taught us anything, it’s that young female viewers crave stories about women in Stem fields. “The Magic School Bus Rides Again” is both a project that will expose young women to the wonders of science and serve as a worthy successor to the “Magic School Bus” of the ’90s. Plus, with her habit of playing smart, weird, enthusiastic characters, McKinnon is the perfect actress to follow in Tomlin’s footsteps.

“Ten Days in the Valley” — Created and Written by Tassie Cameron (Premieres October 1 on ABC)

“Ten Days in the Valley”

What it’s about: Jane Sadler (Kyra Sedgwick) is the producer of a controversial television series about the police. Also a single mother, Jane’s personal and professional lives are upended when her daughter goes missing.

Why we’re excited: Sedgwick has a knack for playing skilled law enforcement officials (“The Closer,” “Brooklyn Nine-Nine”) and also had a memorable turn as a lonely widowed mother in last year’s “Edge of Seventeen.” “Ten Days in the Valley” is a drama that will bridge those two aspects of Sedgwick’s talents and could potentially provide meta-commentary on the way police cases are portrayed on TV versus the way they work in reality.

“9Jkl” — Co-Created by Dana Klein (Premieres October 2 on CBS)

What it’s about: Newly divorced actor Josh Roberts (Mark Feuerstein) returns home to New York City and moves into an apartment bookended by his parents and his brother.

Why we’re excited: “9Jkl” is loosely based on star Feuerstein’s own experiences and was co-created and is exec produced by the actor’s wife, Dana Klein. With a woman in one of the series’ creative roles, it’s likely that “9Jkl” will be more than the typical “dude who can’t get away from his overbearing family” fare. It’s also possible that Klein’s presence behind-the-scenes will mean that the roles of Josh’s mother (Linda Lavin) and sister-in-law (Liza Lapira) will be given more depth than is usual for female characters in broad sitcoms.

The Halcyon” — Created by Charlotte Jones (Premieres October 2 on Ovation)

The Halcyon

What it’s about: This glamorous British import is set in a five-star hotel in WWII-era London. “The Halcyon” takes us into the lives of the socialites and guests who frequent the hotel as well those who work at the venue, and explores how everyone has been affected by the war.

Why we’re excited: “The Halcyon” aired earlier this year in Britain and will finally be available in the U.S. come October. Produced by the people behind “Downton Abbey” and “The Crown,” the series has the potential to become the newest obsession for Anglophiles, fans of period dramas, or anyone who appreciates well-executed costume design. And, of course, “The Halcyon’s” focus on war, politics, and class divisions will also make for some great pop culture think pieces.

“Kevin (Probably) Saves the World” — Created by Michele Fazekas and Tara Butters (Premieres October 3 on ABC)

“Kevin (Probably) Saves the World”

What it’s about: A self-absorbed but unhappy young man (Jason Ritter) is tasked with saving the world by a celestial figure named Yvette (Kimberly Hébert Gregory) after he moves in with his widowed sister (JoAnna Garcia Swisher).

Why we’re excited: For one, anything from former “Agent Carter” showrunners Michele Fazekas and Tara Butters is worth checking out. But “Kevin (Probably) Saves the World” also stands out because it appears to be the rare project that explores faith and the role it can play in people’s lives. Considering the series’ description and the fact that ABC categorizes it as “a light drama,” “Kevin” has the potential to join “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” and “Jane the Virgin” in the growing comedy-with-big-ideas TV genre.

Dynasty” — Co-Created by Stephanie Savage and Sallie Patrick (Premieres October 11 on The CW)

Dynasty

What it’s about: This reboot of the classic primetime soap will present the epic rivalry between the uber-wealthy Carrington and Colby families through the sparring Carrington women: Fallon (Elizabeth Gillies) and her very young stepmother-to-be, Cristal (Nathalie Kelley). Glamour, betrayal, conspicuous consumption, and murder ensue.

Why we’re excited: Over-the-top soap operas can be a lot of fun and “Dynasty” co-creator Stephanie Savage has a knack for building compelling shows around the equal parts fascinating and revolting lives of the crazy rich (Savage has previously worked on “The O.C.” and “Gossip Girl”). Not to mention that the best soaps are the ones whose protagonists are both villains and heroes. It seems the new “Dynasty” will have that in spades with Fallon and Cristal.

“I Love You, America” (Talk Show) (Premieres October 12 on Hulu)

What it’s about: Hosted by Sarah Silverman, the weekly series will be a balanced take on the current political climate and the 45th president. Silverman will present us the week’s most pressing topics with her personal commentary, interviews with people who don’t necessarily agree with her, and of course, many, many jokes.

Why we’re excited: In the Trump era, it can be hard to find any news outlet (comedic or otherwise) that isn’t imbued with despair. And if there’s one thing Silverman’s comedy is known for, it’s the performer’s wonder-filled, childlike persona. Optimism and lightness are in short supply right now, so it will be a relief to have a host like Silverman present the garbage fire that is the world through her trademark perkiness. It will also be interesting to see how many times per episode Silverman will manage to reference “pussy-grabbing.”

“The Rundown With Robin Thede” (Talk Show) (Premieres October 12 on Bet)

Thede: Bet

What it’s about: Robin Thede (“The Nightly Show”) will examine the latest in politics and pop culture through commentary, sketches, and parodies. As Thede told The Hollywood Reporter when news of “The Rundown” broke, “This is going to be a show that is absolutely geared to a black audience and told from a black, female perspective.”

Why we’re excited: Thede is already in the TV history books for being the first black female head writer on a late-night comedy show and she’s sure to bring the insightful, razor-sharp observations about race and gender she honed at “The Nightly Show” to “The Rundown.” Further, while there is the rare white female voice in late-night comedy (Samantha Bee and, soon, Sarah Silverman), black women have not had the opportunity to engage as much with political comedy — so it seems like “The Rundown” will see Thede blaze yet another trail.

“The Day I Met El Chapo: The Kate del Castillo Story” (Docuseries) (Premieres October 20 on Netflix)

Del Castillo: Netflix

What it’s about: Actress Kate del Castillo will share her side of the infamous del Castillo-Sean Penn-Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán story in this three-part Netflix documentary miniseries.

Why we’re excited: While the 2016 meeting between between del Castillo, Penn, and the drug lord El Chapo made international headlines, not many details are known about del Castillo’s role in the rendezvous. It was reported that she “brokered” the meeting and effectively introduced Penn and El Chapo, but the rest of her story has not yet been told. It will be interesting to learn del Castillo’s reasons for working with one of the world’s most-wanted criminals and it seems that Netflix will offer audiences information that has previously been kept from the public, including never-before-seen footage of del Castillo, Penn, and El Chapo’s interaction.

At Home With Amy Sedaris” (Talk Show) — Co-Created by Amy Sedaris (Premieres October 24 on truTV)

At Home With Amy Sedaris

What it’s about: This “Martha Stewart Living” spoof sees actress and writer Amy Sedaris cook, bake, and craft alongside guests like Jane Krakowski, Rachel Dratch, and Sasheer Zamata. Sedaris will present her expertise on the domestic arts through segments like “Entertaining the Grieving” and “The Craft of Love Making” and a song about the appropriate uses for each type of glue.

Why we’re excited: Sedaris has been stealing scenes as a guest star for years (see: “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,” “Broad City,” “Difficult People”) and it’s been 17 years since “Strangers with Candy” went off the air. Needless to say, it’s high-time she starred in her own series. Spending a half-hour with Sedaris each week will be amazing and if we learn how to make fancy, probably X-rated center pieces along the way, so much the better.

Alias Grace” (Miniseries) — Directed by Mary Harron; Written by Sarah Polley (Premieres November 3 on Netflix)

Alias Grace”: Sabrina Lantos/Netflix

What it’s about: Adapted from Margaret Atwood’s historical novel, “Alias Grace” centers on 19th century “murderess” Grace Marks (Sarah Gadon), who was accused and eventually convicted of killing her employer and co-worker. After 10 years of maintaining her innocence in prison, Grace tells her story — or what she can remember of it — to a psychiatrist (Edward Holcroft).

Why we’re excited: Well, if “The Handmaid’s Tale” is any indication, adaptations of Atwood’s work tend to make great TV. As in “The Handmaid’s Tale,” “Alias Grace” centers on a woman trapped in a terrifying, misogynistic system. What makes “Alias Grace” even more chilling is that it is based on the true story of Grace Marks and it’s unclear whether Grace herself is a patsy or a sociopath. And, of course, the upcoming Netflix show is written by “Away from Her” and “Stories We Tell” helmer Sarah Polley and is directed by “American Psycho’s” Mary Harron. There’s no way we’re missing a project that boasts talented women on and offscreen.

Smilf” — Created by Frankie Shaw (Premieres November 5 on Showtime)

Smilf”: Mark Schafer/Showtime

What it’s about: Frankie Shaw stars in, writes, directs, and produces this comedy about a young single mother who finds it’s hard to balance the duties of motherhood with an active sex life, relationships, and a career. “Smilf” is based on Shaw’s 2015 short film of the same name.

Why we’re excited: “Smilf” appears to be a spiritual spinoff of another one of our favorite shows, “Catastrophe,” the Amazon comedy about a couple navigating the ugly realities of parenthood and marriage. With her sexual frankness, her awkward conversations with her gynecologist, and intense love for her kid, Shaw’s “Smilf” character, Bridgette, could be Sharon Morris’ younger, slightly more insecure American sister.

“Danica” (Documentary) — Directed by Hannah Storm (Premieres November 8 on Epix)

Danica Patrick: Nascarking/Wikimedia Commons

What it’s about: Racecar driver and mogul Danica Patrick looks back on her career in the male-dominated world of racing — and provides viewers a glimpse into her life off the speedway — in this documentary from sports broadcast journalist Hannah Storm.

Why we’re excited: Most people who have heard of Danica Patrick know that she’s a Nascar driver, but probably couldn’t tell you too much else about her. Storm’s doc presents a full picture of Patrick as a person, not just as one of the few women in a sport that’s especially male-driven. We’re confident that Storm’s vision will make “Danica” a particularly compelling story. After building a successful career in the man’s world of sports journalism, the director herself is surely familiar with being known as the only woman in the room.

Anne of Green Gables: The Good Stars” (TV Movie) (Premieres November 23 on PBS)

Anne of Green Gables: The Good Stars

What it’s about: This sequel to the 2016 TV movie “Anne of Green Gables” sees Anne Shirley (Ella Ballentine), now 13 years old, struggling to support her family as her guardian Matthew’s (Martin Sheen) health begins to fail. Anne also discovers she has romantic feelings for Gilbert (Drew Haytaoglu), which threatens her close friendship with Diana (Julia Lalonde).

Why we’re excited: Between last year’s “Anne of Green Gables” and the Netflix series “Anne with an E,” L.M. Montgomery’s beloved heroine seems to be making a major comeback. Which makes total sense: Anne is headstrong and true to herself, and must face plenty of hardships at home and at school. That’s something most 13-year-old girls can personally relate to. Keeping that in mind, “The Good Stars” could make for the perfect family — and feminist — Thanksgiving entertainment.

“She’s Gotta Have It” (Premieres November 23 on Netflix)

“She’s Gotta Have It”: David Lee/Netflix

What it’s about: Based on Spike Lee’s 1986 romantic comedy of the same name, “She’s Gotta Have It” centers on artist Nola Darling (DeWanda Wise) as she splits her time between building her career and spending time with her friends and three lovers (Cleo Anthony, Lyriq Bent, and Anthony Ramos).

Why we’re excited: Sex-positive depictions of women on TV have increased in the past few years, but it’s still fairly rare to see a female character who is, on the whole, unconcerned with having a monogamous relationship. Also, “She’s Gotta Have It” seems like the perfect show to fill the “Insecure”-shaped hole in our lives. Like the ladies of Issa Rae’s HBO series, Nola is an intelligent, flawed black woman trying to carve out a space for herself in both the professional and social spheres. And we definitely could see Issa, Molly, Kelli, and Tiffany attending one of Nola’s art shows.

Fall 2017 TV Preview: New Shows By and About Women to Check Out was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

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Tiff 2017 Adds More Programs: “Alias Grace” Series to Make World Premiere

9 August 2017 10:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Alias Grace”: Jan Thijs/Netflix

The Toronto International Film Festival announced even more programs for its 2017 edition today. In addition to the Canadian and Cinematheque film lineups, Tiff unveiled the finalists for Telefilm Canada Pitch This! in which filmmaking teams will have the chance to pitch their film idea to a panel of industry experts. The fest also announced that Montreal filmmaker Anne Émond (“Our Loved Ones,” “Nuit #1”) has been selected as the 2017 Len Blum Resident.

One of our most anticipated TV projects of the year, Netflix’s adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s novel “Alias Grace,” will make its world premiere in Tiff’s Canadian slate, a collection of works from Canadian filmmakers. “Alias Grace” is a six-part miniseries about Grace Marks (Sarah Gadon), a real-life Irish immigrant and servant in 1840s Upper Canada who was accused — and convicted — of murdering her employer and his housekeeper. The series is written and produced by Sarah Polley (“Stories We Tell,” “Away from Her”) and directed by Mary Harron (“American Psycho,” “I Shot Andy Warhol”).

In honor of Canada’s 150th birthday, this year’s Cinematheque event will celebrate Canadian filmmakers by “revisiting and restoring landmarks of Canada’s cinematic history.” Cinematheque will feature a screening of the digitally-restored “I’ve Heard the Mermaids Singing,” written and directed by Patricia Rozema (“Into the Forest”). The 1987 comedic drama follows a photographer (Sheila McCarthy) who discovers that a gallery owner and talented painter (Paule Baillargeon) is actually passing off her lover’s (Ann-Marie MacDonald) artwork as her own.

The Len Blum Residency will see Émond live and work at Tiff Bell Lightbox for two months. She will also receive mentorship from Blum himself, the veteran screenwriter of films like “Stripes” and “Meatballs.” Émond has directed four features and several shorts. Her most recent film, “Nelly,” made its world debut at Tiff 2016. It is a biopic about Canadian novelist Nelly Arcan.

Tiff will be held September 7–17, 2017. Check out the women-directed and co-directed films in the Canadian, Cinematheque, and Pitch This! slates below. Lists and synopses adapted from Tiff.

Canadian

Masters

“Our People Will Be Healed”

Alanis Obomsawin, Canada World Premiere

Discovery

“Ava”

Sadaf Foroughi, Iran/Canada/Qatar World Premiere

Mary Goes Round

Molly McGlynn, Canada World Premiere

“Never Steady, Never Still”

Kathleen Hepburn, Canada World Premiere

Contemporary World Cinema

Meditation Park

Mina Shum, Canada World Premiere

Porcupine Lake

Ingrid Veninger, Canada World Premiere

Primetime

Alias Grace

Mary Harron, Canada/USA World Premiere

Cinematheque

“I’ve Heard the Mermaids Singing”

Patricia Rozema, Canada, 1987

Pitch This!

“12 Days,” Jennifer Mesich, Tracey Deer

Inspired by the remarkable true story of an Indigenous woman who overcame the odds to survive 12 days in the Canadian wilderness. Attacked by a trusted friend, she suffered a broken jaw and was left to die. She persevered and lived to tell the tale.

“Boring Girls,” Coral Aiken, Hannah Cheesman

A deadly coming-of-age story about two teenage girls, Rachel and Fern, who become rising stars in the death metal scene. After experiencing an assault, they decide to embark on a bloody quest for revenge, more gruesome than any of their lyrics.

“Fall from the Sky,” Dan Montgomery, Deragh Campbell, Kaz Radwanski

Lucy, a 30-year-old woman with symptoms of schizophrenia, works as a teacher at a Toronto daycare centre. She begins to experience episodes at work, and struggles to navigate her employment, students, co-workers and personal relationships.

Imposter,” Adam Goldhammer, Evan Landry, Katie McMillan

Lamia Eaton, a teenager isolated on a remote maple farm, investigates her mother’s uncharacteristic and increasingly eerie behavior. As she begins to unearth an evil presence infecting the farm, Lamia is no longer able to trust anyone, including herself.

“Nadia, Butterfly,” Dominique Dussault, Pascal Plante

“Nadia, Butterfly” reveals the backstage world of the Olympic Games through the eyes of Nadia, a 20-year-old butterfly swimmer. Doubt-ridden about her post-Olympic future after winning bronze for Team Canada at the relay, her very last professional event, Nadia loses herself into lustful nights of excesses, punctuated by episodes of deep questioning.

Tiff 2017 Adds More Programs: “Alias Grace” Series to Make World Premiere was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

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Kathryn Bigelow Is Responsible for the Two Best Movies Directed by Women, According to Metacritic — See the Top 25

30 July 2017 9:34 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

After naming Alfonso Cuarón the best-reviewed filmmaker of the 21st century and Jason Friedberg and Aaron Seltzer the worst, Metacritic’s next list explores the 25 best movies directed by women. Unsurprisingly, Kathryn Bigelow takes both the #1 and #2 spots with “Zero Dark Thirty” and “The Hurt Locker,” respectively.

Read MoreAlfonso Cuarón Is the Best Director of the 21st Century, According to Metacritic — See the Top 25

Bigelow became the first woman to win the Academy Award for Best Director with the latter, a painfully tense drama about the Iraq War. (Her latest, “Detroit,” just misses the list by a few points.) Ava DuVernay also shows up twice (with “Selma” and “13th”), as does Sarah Polley (“Away from Her” and “Stories We Tell”), while the likes of Sofia Coppola, Mia Hansen-Løve, and Maren Ade are represented as well. Here’s the data-driven review aggregator’s full list:

Read MoreUwe Boll Isn’t the »

- Michael Nordine

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‘Alias Grace’ Trailer: Netflix’s Period Murder Mystery Brings the Chill to 1840s Canada

18 July 2017 9:13 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Margaret Atwood is shaping up to be the biggest TV star of 2017.

Back in May, the first-look photos gave a colorful first look at “Alias Grace,” a six-part series based on Atwood’s novel of the same name, a based-on-a-true-story 19th century Canadian murder saga. Coupled with the eerie behind-the-scenes Instagram posts from the set, this seemed like a show that could balance dark and light to a chilling effect.

Read More: ‘Alias Grace’ First Look: Sarah Polley Brings Another Powerful Margaret Atwood Story to the Small Screen

Now, we have a little more visual and plot information about the Mary Harron-directed series thanks to the first full trailer. In addition to the “American Psycho” director behind the camera, the series was written by actor/filmmaker/documentarian Sarah Polley. (If you have not yet seen “Stories We Tell,” it is impossible to overstate how quickly that should be added to your to-do list. »

- Steve Greene

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‘Alias Grace’ Trailer: Netflix’s Period Murder Mystery Brings the Chill to 1840s Canada

18 July 2017 9:13 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Margaret Atwood is shaping up to be the biggest TV star of 2017.

Back in May, the first-look photos gave a colorful first look at “Alias Grace,” a six-part series based on Atwood’s novel of the same name, a based-on-a-true-story 19th century Canadian murder saga. Coupled with the eerie behind-the-scenes Instagram posts from the set, this seemed like a show that could balance dark and light to a chilling effect.

Read More: ‘Alias Grace’ First Look: Sarah Polley Brings Another Powerful Margaret Atwood Story to the Small Screen

Now, we have a little more visual and plot information about the Mary Harron-directed series thanks to the first full trailer. In addition to the “American Psycho” director behind the camera, the series was written by actor/filmmaker/documentarian Sarah Polley. (If you have not yet seen “Stories We Tell,” it is impossible to overstate how quickly that should be added to your to-do list. »

- Steve Greene

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Cannes Film Review: ‘Plot 35’

2 June 2017 5:27 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Small is rather beautiful, and also deceptively deep, in Eric Caravaca’s family-history documentary “Plot 35.” Across its slender 65-minute running time it packs the emotional resonance of many a longer feature, if only because, as much as it does describe an arc of change (by its close, there is a photograph on a gravestone where previously there was a gaping absence), it also understands that not all questions have satisfactory answers, and no matter how directly we confront our loved ones, they are their own people, and their secrets belong to them. “Plot 35” doesn’t just explore a family tragedy — it explores the tragedy of family, the way that loving our parents is not the same as understanding them, just as for them, loving their children does not always mean telling them the truth.

It’s noteworthy that Caravaca is an established French actor (he also heads up Philippe Garrel »

- Jessica Kiang

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Sarah Polley To Direct ‘The Best Kind Of People’

12 April 2017 12:15 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Sarah Polley has hit an enviable creative groove. After the director caught everyone’s attention with 2006’s “Away From Her,” she pivoted to the messy but emotionally affecting “Take This Waltz,” and then delivered the terrific, genre-pushing documentary “Stories We Tell.” She’s currently at work on delivering her TV series adaptation of Margaret Atwood‘s “Alias Grace” for Netflix, and now has a new feature cooking which sounds right in her wheelhouse.

Continue reading Sarah Polley To Direct ‘The Best Kind Of People’ at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Sarah Polley Tackling Indie Drama 'The Best Kind of People' (Exclusive)

10 April 2017 2:58 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Sarah Polley, the writer-director behind Stories We Tell and Away From Her, has optioned the film rights to The Best Kind of People, the novel by Zoe Whittall.

Polley will write the screenplay and plans to direct the feature adaptation.

The story focuses on an American family in which the father, a respected teacher, is arrested for a sex crime at a prep school. That occurrence leaves the rest of his family — his wife, who finds a community turning on her; his daughter, who becomes a social pariah; and his son, who helps with his defense — dealing with »

- Borys Kit

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Stephen King: 5 Unadapted Stories That Would Make Excellent Movies

8 April 2017 1:31 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

After the wildly popular reception of the “It” trailer, author Stephen King tweeted a message on April 4 that made fans very hopeful for the adaptations slated to drop in 2017:

The Mist, Mr. Mercedes, 1922, Gerald’S Game, The Dark Tower, and It: Believe it or not, they all look awesome.

Stephen King (@StephenKing) April 4, 2017

King’s films and TV series have a tendency to be varied in terms of quality, but if that tweet is to be believed, there’s a definitely a renaissance afoot. Now that filmmakers seem to be able to hit the right tone from his work, here are five properties which have never been adapted that could make for successful endeavors, along with director and lead actor picks that would be pitch-perfect. To narrow down the picks, any novel or short story that is in some stage of acquisition, development, or that has been made already is ineligible. »

- William Earl

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Amazon vs. Netflix: An Itemized Guide to What You Should Be Streaming This Year

4 April 2017 1:26 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

You time is valuable, and so are both services for different reasons.War Machine (Netflix)

Although there may be a competition going on between Amazon and Netflix for subscribers, the truth is that both company’s streaming services are essential for anyone who watches a lot of movies and TV and who wants to be part of the pop culture conversations as they happen.

There’s no denying that Amazon Prime is worth the $99/year, which not only gives you access to many movies but also a good amount of music streaming and digital media access, plus faster shipping for when you actually want some sort of physical product (you can also just get video content for $8.99/month, which oddly means paying more for less).

And Netflix is still a must-have for both its exclusive and nonexclusive content, though depending on one’s usage could be best for sporadic membership rather than continued subscription — now at $120/year »

- Christopher Campbell

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WonderCon 2017: IndieWire Brings Fan Favorite Showrunners to Anaheim

30 March 2017 1:38 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

IndieWire is bringing a ton of talent and fun to WonderCon this year, with a stacked panel of fan favorite showrunners from a wide variety of awesome TV shows. From animated projects to DC dramas, you’re guaranteed to hear valuable information regarding some of the best shows on TV right now.

Read More: ‘Bojack Horseman’ Creator Reveals The Email He Wrote to Convince Netflix To Do Near-Silent Episode

The producers attending the panel include Marc Guggenheim (“Arrow,” “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow”), Jessica Goldberg (“The Path“), Jonah Ray (“Mystery Science Theater 3000,” “Hidden America”), Sera Gamble (“The Magicians“), Raphael Bob-Waksberg (“BoJack Horseman”), and Aline Brosh McKenna (“Crazy Ex-Girlfriend“). The panel will be moderated by IndieWire’s very own executive editor Michael Schneider.

Read More: 6 Wild (And Early) Emmy Nomination Predictions

The panel gives you the unique opportunity to hear top showrunners in person, conveniently all in one place, as »

- Michael Gonzalez

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WonderCon 2017: IndieWire Brings Fan Favorite Showrunners to Anaheim

30 March 2017 1:38 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

IndieWire is bringing a ton of talent and fun to WonderCon this year, with a stacked panel of fan favorite showrunners from a wide variety of awesome TV shows. From animated projects to DC dramas, you’re guaranteed to hear valuable information regarding some of the best shows on TV right now.

Read More: ‘Bojack Horseman’ Creator Reveals The Email He Wrote to Convince Netflix To Do Near-Silent Episode

The producers attending the panel include Marc Guggenheim (“Arrow,” “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow”), Jessica Goldberg (“The Path“), Jonah Ray (“Mystery Science Theater 3000,” “Hidden America”), Sera Gamble (“The Magicians“), Raphael Bob-Waksberg (“BoJack Horseman”), and Aline Brosh McKenna (“Crazy Ex-Girlfriend“). The panel will be moderated by IndieWire’s very own executive editor Michael Schneider.

Read More: 6 Wild (And Early) Emmy Nomination Predictions

The panel gives you the unique opportunity to hear top showrunners in person, conveniently all in one place, as »

- Michael Gonzalez

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New Directors / New Films: "Happiness Academy"

26 March 2017 7:34 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Have you ever seen a film which mixes documentary with fiction? Hybrid films, films with documentary and fiction parts or at least performed / acted elements have been around for some time. I'm not enough of a documentary expert to know if this is an increasing trend but in the past few years I've seen a few. From my (extremely limited) experience the combo can spark frissons of excitement and thoughtful layers as in Sarah Polley's autobiographical mystery Stories We Tell. The hybrid approach can also be both fascinating and exhausting simultaneously as with Clio Barnard's The Arbor (2010) in which actors lipsynched to recorded interviews from the actual documentary subjects.

At this year's New Directors / New Films festival, which wraps today in NYC, the hybrid technique (genre?) gets another discussable entry via Happiness Academy »

- NATHANIEL R

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Trailer Watch: Elisabeth Moss Wakes Up in “The Handmaid’s Tale”

23 March 2017 12:02 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

“The Handmaid’s Tale”

“I was asleep before. That’s how we let it happen,” says Offred (Elisabeth Moss) in a powerful — and disturbingly timely — new trailer for “The Handmaid’s Tale.” “When they slaughtered Congress we didn’t wake up. When they blamed terrorists and suspended the Constitution we didn’t wake up then, either. Now I’m awake.” Based on the best-selling novel by Margaret Atwood, the series is set in Gilead, a totalitarian society in what was formerly part of the U.S. While the book was published in 1985, its storyline and themes about a horrifying government and women’s reproductive rights being taken away remain all too relevant today.

“Facing environmental disasters and a plunging birthrate, Gilead is ruled by a fundamentalist regime that treats women as property of the state. As one of the few remaining fertile women, Offred is a Handmaid in the Commander’s household, one of the caste of women forced into sexual servitude as a last desperate attempt to repopulate a devastated world,” the show’s official synopsis details. “In this terrifying society where one wrong word could end her life, Offred navigates between Commanders, their cruel Wives, domestic Marthas, and her fellow Handmaids — where anyone could be a spy for Gilead — all with one goal: to survive and find the daughter that was taken from her.”

“You girls will serve the leaders and their barren wives. You will bear children for them,” Offred and the other Handmaids are informed.

When the man who rules the household Offred lives in tells her, “We only wanted to make the world better,” she is incredulous, and asks, “Better?” “Better never means better for everyone,” he says. Yep, Gilead is a patriarchal hellhole, and the trailer does a beautiful job of establishing this fact.

Golden Globe winner Moss is supported by a cast that includes Samira Wiley (“Orange Is the New Black”), Alexis Bledel (“Gilmore Girls”), Joseph Fiennes (“Shakespeare in Love”), and Yvonne Strahovski (“Dexter”).

“The Handmaid’s Tale” isn’t the only high-profile Atwood adaptation in the works. Anna Paquin (“True Blood”) and Sarah Gadon (“Belle”) are set to star in Netflix’s adaptation of Atwood’s “Alias Grace,” a drama inspired by the true story of convicted murderer Grace Marks (Gadon), a young Irish immigrant and domestic servant living in Upper Canada. The miniseries is written and produced by Sarah Polley (“Stories We Tell”) and directed by Mary Harron (“American Psycho”). The project will debut sometime in 2017.

High-Rise,” “Truth,” and “Meadowland” are among Moss’ recent credits. The “Mad Men” alumna will reprise her role as detective Robin Griffin for Season 2 of “Top of the Lake,” also due sometime this year. This season of the feminist murder mystery series, co-created by Jane Campion (“The Piano”), will feature Nicole Kidman and “Game of Thrones’” Gwendoline Christie.

“The Handmaid’s Tale” hits Hulu April 26. Reed Morano (“Meadlowland”) helmed the first three episodes of the 10-episode drama.

https://medium.com/media/78b6f15770a5427ef482d3fdeb8ed46a/href

Trailer Watch: Elisabeth Moss Wakes Up in “The Handmaid’s Tale” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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‘The Librarians’ Star Noah Wyle: What’s Driving Him to Save Family Friendly TV

19 January 2017 9:51 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Noah Wyle knows “The Librarians” is one of television’s most unique shows— especially on TNT.

The show, which airs its season finale this Sunday, isn’t a dark drama like the network’s latest original series, “Animal Kingdom” and “Good Behavior.” But Wyle, who executive produces the show, appeared in seven episodes this season, directed two and even wrote one, believes “The Librarians” serves a purpose, as one of the few shows on TV crafted to serve as true family programming.

“There’s certain shows that have a big audience but don’t necessarily fit the edgier brand that I think TNT is trying to be. Yet, they bring an audience that’s a pretty good demographic,” he said to IndieWire. “They have been supportive, they have been marketing the show well this year, and the numbers speak to that. I’m hoping that they figure out that it’s not an either/or. »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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‘The Librarians’ Star Noah Wyle: What’s Driving Him to Save Family Friendly TV

19 January 2017 9:51 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Noah Wyle knows “The Librarians” is one of television’s most unique shows— especially on TNT.

The show, which airs its season finale this Sunday, isn’t a dark drama like the network’s latest original series, “Animal Kingdom” and “Good Behavior.” But Wyle, who executive produces the show, appeared in seven episodes this season, directed two and even wrote one, believes “The Librarians” serves a purpose, as one of the few shows on TV crafted to serve as true family programming.

“There’s certain shows that have a big audience but don’t necessarily fit the edgier brand that I think TNT is trying to be. Yet, they bring an audience that’s a pretty good demographic,” he said to IndieWire. “They have been supportive, they have been marketing the show well this year, and the numbers speak to that. I’m hoping that they figure out that it’s not an either/or. »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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