(2013)

Critic Reviews

44

Metascore

Based on 35 critic reviews provided by Metacritic.com
80
Entertaining and smart, with a great, career 2.0 performance from Ashton Kutcher.
63
It's superficial, but that plays into the hands of the film's star, Ashton Kutcher.
63
Jobs is a just-the-facts - and fiddling-with-the-facts - dramatization, forgoing any kind of deeper psychological exploration of the man and his motivations, his demons and dreams.
63
It's a competently made, traditional biopic about a man who disdained those terms.
60
The filmmakers do fall into the trap of overly sentimentalizing a widely beloved public figure who represents an enormous cultural significance. At the same time, however, they keep the movie frequently engaging.
58
The movie is constantly at war with attempts to provide an honest portrayal, almost as if its subject were reaching beyond the grave to steer any negativity back in the direction of a hagiography.
55
So the principal point of controversy involved here is not Jobs himself, but Ashton Kutcher, who plays him. The actor's approach is to ape Jobs' speech and movements, which he does quite well. Whether mimicry qualifies as characterization is a question for Jobs' viewers to answer for themselves.
50
Ultimately, Jobs is a prosaic but not unaffecting tribute to the virtues of defiance, nonconformity, artistry, beauty, craftsmanship, imagination and innovation, qualities it only intermittently reflects as a piece of filmmaking.
50
If it weren't for his voice, Kutcher would have been the ideal choice to star in Jobs, a well-meant but ultimately unsurprising biopic.
50
For (nearly) every yin of Ashton Kutcher's Steve Jobs flashing a moment of brilliance, there's a yang of someone saying he's changed or is his own worst enemy. The unwritten, but understood, full title of Joshua Michael Stern's film is "Jobs: Brilliant Asshole."
50
If one were to compare this film to one of Jobs's own products, it would be more like the Cube than the iPod.
50
The dialogue comes straight out of "The Benny Goodman Story." That look, someone says to a staring, pausing Kutcher, "tells me you're on to something big." Nobody talks in this movie; everyone speechifies or take turns sloganing one another to death.
50
Jobs works much better as a history of Apple than it does as a portrait of the genius who dreamed it up.
50
One thing it doesn't do is offer a revealing look at the mercurial entrepreneur. The movie that bears his name settles on a blandly superficial treatment of a deeply complex man.
50
At its best, it's a good picture, and at its worst, it's almost good.
50
Jobs is a one-man show that needed to go for broke and doesn't. My guess is that Jobs would give it a swat.
40
This is far from the bomb some would have envisaged, but neither is it the character illumination one would wish for. Jobs appears so consumed by his work here that little else mattered in his life. That may be true, but we're left none the wiser as to what made the man tick, beyond what we already know.
30
There was a time when the slack storytelling, stock characterizations and general by-the-numbers feeling of the film could be put into perspective by saying it seemed like a TV biopic. But even TV movies are done with more verve than this these days.
20
Where the film completely falls down is in director Joshua Michael Stern's disastrous decision to cast Ashton Kutcher in the central role.
0
Steered by a lead actor and director, Joshua Michael Stern, who are both way out of their respective leagues, Jobs is excruciating, failing to entertain and all but pissing on its subject's grave.

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