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Blue Jasmine (2013) Poster

(2013)

Trivia

Costume designer Suzy Benzinger had a budget of only $35, 000. The Hermès bag that Jasmine carries was worth more than the entire budget and was borrowed, as were most of the designer outfits.
Loosely based upon Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar named Desire".
Cate Blanchett and Sally Hawkins were the only members of the cast to have the complete script during filming.
Because Woody Allen doesn't get into motivation or background of a character when he's directing actors, Cate Blanchett and Sally Hawkins got together and invented the background for the sisters' relationship. So every scene when they talked about their past, although it's vague on the script and for the viewer, they both knew exactly what the sisters are talking about.
Louis C.K. originally auditioned for the part played by Andrew Dice Clay. Woody Allen felt that C.K. was too nice to play the role and offered him another part.
In Sophia Loren's memoir "Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow: My Life", the screen legend reveals that she still absorbs inspiration from other actors to enhance her own acting portrayals, saying, "Recently, I was struck by the last scene in 'Blue Jasmine', where Cate Blanchett has an expression on her face I'd never seen before. That expression crept inside me, and it lies there waiting to germinate a new plant, a new flower."
The first and only Woody Allen movie in which two principal American characters are played by non-natives: Australian Cate Blanchett and British Sally Hawkins.
The third Woody Allen film in which Alec Baldwin has been cast.
Woody Allen's third film with a 2.35:1 aspect ratio, after Manhattan (1979) and Anything Else (2003). Unlike those films, which were shot with anamorphic lenses, this was shot with spherical lenses in Super 35.
Bradley Cooper was considered for a role but he dropped out due to scheduling conflicts.
Many critics and viewers of this movie noted that the plot bore many essential similarities to to Tennessee Williams's 1947 play A Streetcar Named Desire. Despite the unmistakable similarities between the plots of Streetcar and Blue Jasmine, however, there was no acknowledgment of Williams in the credits, and Woody Allen was nominated for an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay (not Adapted). With Blue Jasmine, Allen was repeating the tactic for creating a screenplay that he had used for Match Point, which bears unmistakable plot similarities to to Theodore Dreiser's 1925 novel An American Tragedy but which didn't credit Dreiser. Allen was also nominated for Best Original Screenplay for Match Point.

Theodore Dreiser's 1925 novel An American Tragedy, as well as the 1951 movie version of that novel, A Place in the Sun (starring Montgomery Clift, Shelley Winters, and Elizabeth Taylor. Despite the unmistakable similarity between the plots of An American Tragedy and Match Point, however, there was no acknowledgment of Dreiser in the credits, and Match Point's only Oscar nomination was for Best Original Screenplay (not Adapted). Allen later repeated this tactic for creating a screenplay with his screenplay for Blue Jasmine, which bears unmistakable plot similarities to Tennessee Williams's play A Streetcar Named Desire but which didn't credit Williams. Allen was again nominated for Best Original Screenplay for Blue Jasmine.
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