four mini games in which players can control the movement of their 'Star Wars' AI characters.
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Mavra Zane (voice)
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TC-38 (voice)
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Mak Pra / Red 6 / Venator Captain (voice)
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Count Dooku / Darth Ror / Red 7 / ResMalD (voice)
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Darth Kern / Obi-Wan Kenobi / Gold 6 / ResMalC (voice)
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Watto (voice)
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Sebulba / Imperial Guard (voice) (as Lewis MacLeod)
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Fode (voice)
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Red 5 / ResMaI A / Sun Guard 1 / Civilian (voice)
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Gold 4 / Intercom / PC Female Pilot / pad1 (voice)
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NPCFemPadawan / pad4 / padFem (voice)
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four mini games in which players can control the movement of their 'Star Wars' AI characters.

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Genres:

Action | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

T
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Release Date:

3 April 2012 (USA)  »

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Soundtracks

Aerodynamic
Performed by Daft Punk
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User Reviews

 
This game was not good. It wasn't a force to be reckoned with.
4 May 2017 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I didn't really Kinect with this Star Wars: Game, that much. Both physically and mentally. Honestly, besides the highly ridiculous & foolish, 'Galactic Dance-off', these mini games, are not, the fun, you been looking for. Most of them were Bantha crap. Let's start with the primary game mode, "Jedi Destiny". In 'Jedi Destiny', players assume the role models of Jedi Padawans as they wield their lightsabers and use the Force to attack enemies mostly from the prequel trilogy using gestures. While, the story mode 'Dark Side Rising' sounds, like it might be a lot of fun; the truth is, it isn't, as you don't have the choice to play any of the famous Jedis. Not even, the minor characters from the Star Wars movie. In the end, you're playing as generic, pre-made, bland mute characters with little to no personality. Added to that problem, is the somewhat static controls. It makes the game hard to play. The Kinect really has trouble recognizing certain movements like jumps & certain jabs in this one. It wasn't smooth at all. Add to that problem, is the uneven amount of difficulty. One minute, it would be, extremely easy & boring, and others parts, would be, insanely hard & frustrating. Also, if you die, you can't pass, the cut scenes. So, a lot of the gameplay, is highly repetitive. A second Jedi-centric mode, 'Duels of Fate' was also a pain in the butt. It's supposed to allow players to experience one-on-one duels with characters from the Jedi Destiny campaign as well as famous Star Wars villains such as Darth Vader. However, every action is predictable, as most of the movement is just recycled from the training sequence from 'Jedi Destiny'. Like the other mode, it's too highly scripted. The pod-racing mode is equally as bad, as 'Jedi Destiny', as the Kinect motion sensor can't sense, certain leaning or combine movements. You will find yourself, crashing into walls, many, many times, during the race. If anything, just buy 1999's computer game/Nintendo 64 'Star Wars Episode I: Racer', if you want to fill your need for speed thirst. It's sad that a racing game, made 12 years earlier, is a lot better than this update version of Star Wars racing. Anyways, that brings us to the 'Rancor Rampage' mode. In this mode, a Rancor wreaks havoc on different planets, with the player controlling the Rancor. The goal is to destroy everything in their path, the player's arm movements controlling the Rancor's arm movements. Surprising, this game was, not that bad. However, it does get a bit tiresome, after a few minutes of playing, because how easy, it was. There wasn't much challenge. After a while, it's become too simple & childish to play, for my taste. In the end, there was only one mini game in 'Kinect: Star Wars' that, continues to hold on, over the years, & that is 'Galactic Dance-Off'. In this mode, very similar to 2010's 'Dance Central' video game, also released on the Kinect, the player copies dance movements the characters on screen perform: while several Star Wars parodies of famous songs at the time, play in three different world backgrounds (Jabba's Palace, Cloud City's Carbonite Chamber, & the Death Star Throne Room) such as "Ridin' Solo," by artist, Jason Derulo or 'Genie in a bottle' by artist, Christina Aguilera. While, some die-hard fans might find this sequence, very stupid and the most blatant abuse of the license since the infamous 1978's 'Star Wars Holiday Special'. I found this mode tasking you to dance for points and stars, worth playing, just to see, what other parody songs can be unlocked. This mini game, alone, almost makes up, for the lack of entertaining, from the others parts of 'Kinect: Star Wars'. However, as a Star Wars fan, I still can't say, the game is decent, just because the absurd dancing mode. Why, because it's hard to look past all the uneven visuals throughout the game. The occasionally broken animations, that drops in framerate, along with syncing issues where sound clips and voices don't match up or sound the same, makes it's hard to give, this game, a good review. In the end, your dreams of wielding a lightsaber and using the-powerful living Force have to be put on hold, because of awkward control issues. Trust me, when I say this, if the game has problems for the players moving the motion sensor, in the menu sequence. Then, your game needs to be a little more polish. Plus, what type of modern game, these days, doesn't have an online mode. Overall: 'Kinect: Star Wars' reach for the stars, but sadly fallen so far down, over the years. It's a game that I really can't recommended, playing. You're looking for love, in Alderaan places.


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