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Hell's Miners of Potosi (2011)

At an altitude of 4,700 meters, Bolivian miners are disappearing everyday into the depths of the Potossi mountain. Poisoned by the dust, exhausted by hypoxia, and threatened by collapsing, ... See full summary »

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At an altitude of 4,700 meters, Bolivian miners are disappearing everyday into the depths of the Potossi mountain. Poisoned by the dust, exhausted by hypoxia, and threatened by collapsing, they tirelessly dig the rock, in a suffocating atmosphere. Eduardo, a 22 years old boy, dreams of making a fortune here, and is ready to embrace the risky lives of the Potossi miners. Written by Anonymous

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April 2011 (France)  »

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Everyone, especially documentary and technology fiends, should watch this!
28 April 2014 | by (Australia) – See all my reviews

After watching this film, it left such a strong impact I not only told everyone I knew about it for the next month, but I actually wished IMDb had a kickstarter~esque donate button. One that allows you to choose whether to pay everyone, the artist, the studio or even just a director. Currently no such thing is in place, which is sad as I'd love to help this guy make his next documentary.

Perhaps the best part about this film is how bare-bones it was. Personally, having grown up in Australia and seeing the huge mines we have, I assumed that mining had advanced and technology helps us compared to the old pit mines. While this may be somewhat true in the Western world, this documentary invites us into a bare-bones mine. Here we are told and shown a story of how the Minecraft game is real life for these miners in Potosi.

Where Iron Lung is still part of life and the fact people, real people doing it tough with families to feed, can actually die, just so I can sit here on my pc or smart devices and type this review. Well straight away it 'grounds the viewer' into the fact not everything is run by machines. People are still working really hard. Being taken aboard the directors vision and having the opportunity to view these miners' lives, well it instantly made me much more appreciative of the devices I have and the lifestyle I lead.

Very few documentaries I've seen are this good, and for me it might be the fact it wasn't filmed by unrealistic people too cautious to get their hands dirty. For me this is the kind of journalism I wish was more prominent in our world. Had it had a massive budget and huge team, I doubt it would be as good.

Honestly, give it a chance, if for nothing else, just to understand and respect the people that risk their lives while mining for us, so we can have nice things. I applaud this documentary and hope you make another!


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